Tag Archive | "temasek holdings"

More S’poreans applying to be Temasek CEO

More S’poreans applying to be Temasek CEO

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Hundreds have submitted their CVs, looking for job security.

temasek-CEO

Temasek Holdings’ newly appointed chairman Lim Boon Heng has said the hunt for the next CEO of the investment firm is still ongoing.

One-time successor, Charles Goodyear, abruptly resigned in 2009 as CEO, and it has been four years of fruitless search.

This has led Singaporeans to feel inclined to help Temasek. They have started to send in their CVs to be considered for the top job.

A cab driver, Jia De Shi, 49, said he has submitted his CV to Temasek for consideration: “I take more risk sitting behind the wheel everyday as a cabby. I have shown that I have skin in the game and an appetite for risk and swift decisions. Please consider me to be CEO.”

But he is likely to face stiff competition.

A fresh graduate from NUS, Gan Pi Yeh, said: “I did an internship with a media company before. So I believe I’ve what it takes to be a CEO of a Singaporean company that does knowledge economy stuff.”

Temasek’s portfolio is valued at $215-billion, which is worth twice as much as Malaysia.

The current CEO is Ho Ching, 60, wife of Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

Ho Ching mistaken for tea lady at Shangri-La

Ho Ching mistaken for tea lady at Shangri-La

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Hotel management apologises profusely

Red faces were present throughout the 2013 Shangri-La Dialogue yesterday as Ho Ching was ordered by an unwitting waiter to wipe up spilt wine. While the wife of Singapore’s Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong who is also the head of Temasek Holdings obliged with nary a smile, Shangri-La management were clearly mortified.

At the 2013 Singapore-Indonesia Leaders retreat. Pic stolen from PM Lee's own facbeook page.

With the Indonesian Prime Minister and his wife. Pic stolen from PM Lee’s own facbeook page.

“That white napkin was not meant to be anywhere near red wine!” said head waiter Philippe de Garcon. “It’s frightfully embarrassing that Mdm Ho now thinks that we don’t know the first thing about hospitality.”

According to attendees at the annual security dialogue, Ho later pulled the offending waiter aside and gave him pointers on how to clear up spilt fluids using just a quarter of a napkin.

This would not be a first time Ho was not recognised as the most powerful mother in Singapore. Attendees of various functions ranging from the Chingay parade to Chinese New Year celebrations noted that Ho used to be mistaken for a lion dance troupe member due to her distaste for any article of clothing remotely feminine or flattering to the female form.

Chingay 2010

PM Lee and Ho Ching at Chingay Parade 2010

“She certainly cuts a maternal figure,” said style guru Jeannie Mai. “Like many other powerful women in the political world, she doesn’t seem to mind exuding masculinity, though she does fall on the slightly dowdy side.”

Masculinity is the road to power - Angela Merkel, Wu Yi and Ho Ching.

Masculinity is the road to power – Angela Merkel, Wu Yi and Ho Ching.

“Truly, I could never tell that she was the wife of the Prime Minister” said a foreign dignitary present at the Shangri-La dialogue, who chose not to be named.

“The first time I saw her, I honestly thought the world had its second gay prime minister!”

“But after all that’s said, she has a great heart.”

Power gesture from Mdm Ho at the Institute of Policy Studies Luncheon, Wednesday July 29, 2009

Power gesture from Mdm Ho at the Institute of Policy Studies Luncheon, Wednesday July 29, 2009

 

 

 

 

 





Reader says Temasek Review Emeritus deserves to be sued

Reader says Temasek Review Emeritus deserves to be sued

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Dear New Nation editor,

I’m outraged that Singaporeans such as those running the Temasek Review Emeritus (TRE) website are making baseless claims about the meritocratic nature of our honorable government.

I especially take issue with the recent post in which one out of the seven short paragraphs was dedicated to slandering the CEO of one of our two sovereign wealth funds, Temasek Holdings.

In it, the TRE contributor suggests that Mdm Ho Ching became the Chief Executive Officer of Temasek Holdings for nepotistic reasons.

Mdm Ho’s husband’s lawyer, Mr Davinder Singh, then sent a letter, rightly so, demanding an apology from TRE as the allegations concern the integrity of his client, the Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Hsien Loong.

The post is obviously a false, baseless and malicious series of claims made by an unpatriotic citizen who doesn’t appreciate what the government has done for us all these years.

PM Lee, being the son of the esteemed former Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew, has high standards for his partner. It is little wonder that he would pick the capable Mdm Ho Ching as his wife and even less wonder that she was chosen as the head of the nation’s sovereign wealth fund based on talent alone.

When Mr S. Dhanabalan, a former cabinet minister under Lee Kuan Yew, was looking for a head for Temasek Holdings, it wasn’t the fact that Mdm Ho was the daughter-in-law of his former boss that made him decide on her.

It was Dhanabalan’s ability to modify Temasek’s executive committee to allow Ho to report to him, and not the Prime Minister, that allowed the PM to diminish his discomfort with having Ho as the head of the fund.

And Ho’s brilliance subsequently blew her competition all away.

Phillip Goodyear, former head of mining giant BHP Billiton, for example, lasted merely a few months before giving up.

The author of the TRE article cites Mr Koh Boon Hwee, former chairman of DBS Bank as a potential candidate who was overlooked. He says that he knows of only ONE thing that Ho did better than Mr Koh.

Because he did not specify what this ONE thing is, I can only surmise that Ho was picked because her name was shorter.

And therefore a cost saver when they have to print name tags.

Or maybe Mr Koh didn’t apply for the job.

Anyway, I urge the Singapore government to take such allegations of nepotism very seriously.

All members of the Lee family have been appointed to their positions by merit alone – our current Prime Minister earned his stripes in the 2006 elections with a 66.1% approval rate, and then with a 69.3% approval rate last year as he battled it out with an opposition team consisting of two kids members below the age of 25.

The government works hard to keep this vulnerable island from falling to pieces.

Editors of TRE should be ashamed of themselves and should be sued to prevent other websites from making similar baseless allegations.