Tag Archive | "soldiers"

Let SAF soldiers drive commuters home during MRT disruptions

Let SAF soldiers drive commuters home during MRT disruptions

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Military camps have spare vehicle capacity.

saf-transport

“Ah boy ah, got go Punggol one?”

Instead of getting soldiers to manage the crowd during train disruptions (“Soldiers may help manage crowds in rail disruptions”; Aug 21), we should let them drive the commuters to their destinations instead.

Our military camps have a fair amount of spare vehicle capacity.

Crowd control at MRT stations won’t be very necessary if we can provide other means of transport that will allow the crowd to quickly disperse from the stations.

Rather than cure the symptom of a breakdown – the crowd – we should fix the underlying cause – the failure of an important means of transport.

Sum Siew Kee

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times on Aug. 25, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to SAF deploying soldiers to manage commuters during MRT disruptions

S’poreans react to SAF deploying soldiers to manage commuters during MRT disruptions

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

soldiers-mrt-disruptions

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) has approached the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) to explore deploying soldiers during large-scale disruptions to give directions and manage crowds.

Tapping on the military during massive disruptions makes sense as soldiers can be called up and deployed at short notice and can channel commuters to the right places as quickly as possible.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “This is expected as SMRT is already being run by paper generals from the army.”
Kee Zho Peng, 42-year-old nurse

 

sian-half-uncle “Men who have been trained for war are indeed the best candidates on the ground during MRT disruptions.”
Jin Juay Lang, 62-year-old bookie

 

happy-bird-girl “This proves the military can be deployed in an instant to intervene, such as when the PAP loses majority in parliament.”
Gao Zhen Zhi, 17-year-old political scientist