Tag Archive | "robbery"

S’poreans react to news that robbery considered a serious crime even if no weapons used

S’poreans react to news that robbery considered a serious crime even if no weapons used

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Three thoughts you must have had.

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Criminal lawyers in Singapore say that the man who robbed S$30,000 from a Standard Chartered Bank branch in Holland Village could face serious charges that attract a severe punishment under the Penal Code.

This is so even if he did not show or use a weapon.

What remains crucial are the elements of threat and fear, which they say were both present during the robbery.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “But banks have been robbing people without using any weapons for the longest time.”
Da Qiang, 43-year-old teller

 

sian-half-uncle “The bank employee who gave up the money without a struggle was not obliged to die for her job. Or bank.”
Ying Hang, 68-year-old security guard

 

happy-bird-girl “Sometimes a white man’s charm is all it takes.”
Espee Gee, 17-year-old dancer

 

 

 

 

 

 





Let Standard Chartered robber go scot-free as S’pore no longer has blame culture

Let Standard Chartered robber go scot-free as S’pore no longer has blame culture

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Public and authorities can learn from this episode.

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Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe blame must not be pushed onto people unnecessarily anymore, have come out to appeal on behalf of the robber who robbed a Standard Chartered bank in Holland Village.

One Singaporean, Yue Liang Ta, said: “Let him go scot-free. Singapore no longer has a blame culture. We only have a learn culture.”

“The pain and regret from robbing a bank and having to make a run for it will cause lactic acid to build up in his legs and make him feel tired and out-of-breath and make him think about how he should have trained harder for the event but did not.”

Other Singaporeans said the authorities can make this a learning point.

A local, Mah Ta Lia, said: “Maybe if we stopped arresting people, that would be a start to a learning culture.”