Tag Archive | "population"

Pockets of space on Circle Line platforms show S’pore can fit another 5 million people

Pockets of space on Circle Line platforms show S’pore can fit another 5 million people

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Good news, Singaporeans.

mrt-platform-circle-line

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to take public transport because cars are for rich people, are rejoicing and clapping their hands in glee.

This after stunning images out this morning from Circle Line MRT platforms throughout Singapore show pockets of space indicating the country can still take in another five million more people.

One Singaporean, Bu Gou Ren, said: “I am amazed how spacious the place is still. I could walk to the exit and only dry humped 34 people in the process.”

Other locals said they hope the government can open the borders to allow more foreigners to take root here.

Another local, Zuo Ai, said: “Josephine Teo was right, you only need a small space to have sex.”

“This morning on the Circle Line, I was seriously screwed over.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans shocked to find so many of them around

S’poreans shocked to find so many of them around

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Some at Hong Lim Park protest resort to demanding for lesser foreigners, as well as lesser locals by 2030.

Hong Lim Park protest draws a crowd of between 1,000 and 45,000 people, depending on who you ask. (Photo stolen from Choon Hiong)

Hong Lim Park protest draws a crowd of between 1,000 and 45,000 people, depending on who you ask. (Photo stolen from Choon Hiong)

Some Singaporeans among those who turned up in droves to attend the Hong Lim Park protest on Feb. 16, were shocked to see that there were so many of them around.

This caused the initial protest against the PAP government’s plan to increase the population by importing more foreigners to take a turn. Some locals ended up calling on the government to limit the number of Singaporeans as well.

One Singaporean protester, Jin Juay Lang, said: “There is really no place here already. You see for yourself. Cannot stand so many people. So stuffy. Everybody so sticky some more.”

The large turnout for the protest was unexpected, given that there was a heavy downpour. And it was the Chinese New Year weekend.

However, one Singaporean Chinese couple, who are childless, said they “chose” to attend the protest as they “wanted to” support the other protesters even though it was the Chinese New Year weekend.

The man, who refused to be named, said: “I actually came here to siam the Chinese New Year visitation today because every year must give ang bao but cannot receive very siong one, you know.”

Estimates of the number of protesters have ranged from 1,000 as reported by mainstream media to 45,000, according to some online sources on Facebook.

Others who were shocked to see so many Singaporeans congregate at one location, said this reminded them of the good old days of yesteryear when Singaporeans were united together for a common purpose: Such as The Great Singapore Sale 2012.

Da Zhe Kou, a Singaporean shopaholic, said: “This is like Zara. But outdoors. And raining. But the smell is quite similar.”

Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

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Proposal by research fellow is to formalise the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Why do Singaporeans resent the influx of foreigners?

There are two reasons: One, foreigners compete for jobs, cause strains to our transportation network and health-care infrastructure, and are perceived to have caused reduced housing and education opportunities.

Two, locals see their standing and ethos eroded by the growing number foreigners and will react by defensively protecting their values and heritage.

However, in a study conducted by the Reach Policy Study Workgroup two years ago, the main bugbear in the local-foreign divide is the issue of National Service.

The Institute of Policy Studies produced the same finding in a recent study.

The heart of the issue? Singaporeans are dismayed not all immigrants are enlisted.

And to compound the problem, second-generation permanent residents can renounce their residency to avoid NS.

Some male offspring of PRs reportedly delay becoming residents until they are past enlistment age.

Plus, it has even been revealed last November by the Ministry of Defence that one-third of NS-liable 18-year-old PRs chose to give up their residency and not fulfill their NS obligations.

Therefore, it is the duty of policymakers to address the issue of inequality in serving National Service, be it a real or perceived issue of unequal treatment.

The fact is that Singaporeans who complete full-time NS are still liable to be recalled for duties, putting them at a disadvantage in the area of their work and profession.

Therefore, it should be made mandatory for children who want to attain permanent residency to serve NS.

The proposal is to remove the choice given to PRs, and formalising the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Foreigners who wish to apply for permanent residency for their children should be counselled by immigration officers and given a realistic preview of NS before submitting applications.

Parents would then have to put up a security bond if they really want to apply PR for their children.

The money will be forfeited if they do not want to serve NS eventually.

This works the same way as Singaporean parents who put up a security bond of their son who goes overseas to study.

If he doesn’t return by 18 years old to serve, the security bond is forfeited.

The money recovered by the state can be viewed as a return of any benefits in education or other subsidies enjoyed by the son.

This is a 60-second reduction of the original article published in The Straits Times on May 9, 2012, by Leong Chan-Hoong, a research fellow at the Institute of Policy Studies, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, NUS.

Editor’s note: Doesn’t addressing the NS issue only affect, at best, half of the PR applicants? The issue is certainly more complex after glancing past the superficial surface if we consider that ladies can apply to be Singapore PR without serving NS and can end up doing jobs that local men do as well.

His Leeness: Singapore needs more babies

His Leeness: Singapore needs more babies

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Or else, fewer new cars, stereos, computers, iPhones, iPads and clothes will be sold.

Hmmm and His Leeness once said "Two is enough" before...

Women in developed countries today are as educated and well-paid as men.

This makes women less socially and economically dependent on people of the other gender and more likely to remain single.

If she marries someone with a dong, it’s only because that person must add value to her life. Or she desires to have children.

In the developed world, this turn of events is creating massive changes in the United States and Western European countries.

The reproduction rate that is keeping the population stable is below the 2.1 level.

And Singapore’s experience is no different.

The fertility rate for the Chinese segment is the lowest at 1.08.

For Indians, it is 1.09. For Malays, it is 1.64.

This means that the size of each successive generation of Chinese Singaporeans will halve in the next 18 to 20 years.

Women putting off having children has drastic implications on Singapore.

For one, less children means the burden of taking care of the elderly will be greater.

Last year, seven working adults supported one retiree.

By 2030, 2.3 working adults will have to support one retiree.

Low fertility and an ageing population would mean we are dependent on immigrants to make up our numbers.

Without them, Singapore will face the prospect of a shrinking workforce and a stagnant economy.

Fewer younger people means fewer new cars, stereos, computers, iPhones, iPad and clothes will be sold, not to mention fewer customers to partake in fine dining.

Ancillary businesses will take a hit.

The Singapore government is encouraging marriage and parenthood through incentives: The aim is to encourage parents to have three or four or more children.

This is a 60-second reduction of the original article published in The Straits Times on May 9, 2012 by Lee Kuan Yew that first appeared in this month’s Forbes Magazine.