Tag Archive | "permanent resident"

More otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

More otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

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They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 











Increasing number of otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

Increasing number of otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 









S’pore sees increasing number of otters applying to become permanent residents

S’pore sees increasing number of otters applying to become permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 









More otters applying to be S’pore permanent residents

More otters applying to be S’pore permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, plus the impending general election on May 5, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time.

Singaporeans, interviewed by New Nation, said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 









Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

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Proposal by research fellow is to formalise the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Why do Singaporeans resent the influx of foreigners?

There are two reasons: One, foreigners compete for jobs, cause strains to our transportation network and health-care infrastructure, and are perceived to have caused reduced housing and education opportunities.

Two, locals see their standing and ethos eroded by the growing number foreigners and will react by defensively protecting their values and heritage.

However, in a study conducted by the Reach Policy Study Workgroup two years ago, the main bugbear in the local-foreign divide is the issue of National Service.

The Institute of Policy Studies produced the same finding in a recent study.

The heart of the issue? Singaporeans are dismayed not all immigrants are enlisted.

And to compound the problem, second-generation permanent residents can renounce their residency to avoid NS.

Some male offspring of PRs reportedly delay becoming residents until they are past enlistment age.

Plus, it has even been revealed last November by the Ministry of Defence that one-third of NS-liable 18-year-old PRs chose to give up their residency and not fulfill their NS obligations.

Therefore, it is the duty of policymakers to address the issue of inequality in serving National Service, be it a real or perceived issue of unequal treatment.

The fact is that Singaporeans who complete full-time NS are still liable to be recalled for duties, putting them at a disadvantage in the area of their work and profession.

Therefore, it should be made mandatory for children who want to attain permanent residency to serve NS.

The proposal is to remove the choice given to PRs, and formalising the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Foreigners who wish to apply for permanent residency for their children should be counselled by immigration officers and given a realistic preview of NS before submitting applications.

Parents would then have to put up a security bond if they really want to apply PR for their children.

The money will be forfeited if they do not want to serve NS eventually.

This works the same way as Singaporean parents who put up a security bond of their son who goes overseas to study.

If he doesn’t return by 18 years old to serve, the security bond is forfeited.

The money recovered by the state can be viewed as a return of any benefits in education or other subsidies enjoyed by the son.

This is a 60-second reduction of the original article published in The Straits Times on May 9, 2012, by Leong Chan-Hoong, a research fellow at the Institute of Policy Studies, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, NUS.

Editor’s note: Doesn’t addressing the NS issue only affect, at best, half of the PR applicants? The issue is certainly more complex after glancing past the superficial surface if we consider that ladies can apply to be Singapore PR without serving NS and can end up doing jobs that local men do as well.