Tag Archive | "otters"

More otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

More otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

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They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 











Increasing number of otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

Increasing number of otters applying to become S’pore permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 









S’pore sees increasing number of otters applying to become permanent residents

S’pore sees increasing number of otters applying to become permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time as places such as Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park get increasing populated with newly-arrived otter population.

Singaporeans said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”

 

 

 

 

 









More otters applying to be S’pore permanent residents

More otters applying to be S’pore permanent residents

Tags: ,


They promise to mingle with locals and make good neighbours.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Newly arrived otters waiting for a cab to go to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority building.

Over the past six months, close to 30 otters have been applying for permanent resident status every day, according to statistics from the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.

Many of the otters are arriving at the northern coast of Singapore seeking a new start due to habitat destruction in Malaysia, plus the impending general election on May 5, which is forcing them to relocate.

This number is set to increase over time.

Singaporeans, interviewed by New Nation, said they welcome the otters as long as they don’t steal local jobs and cause housing prices to explode.

And experts interviewed say they have avenues to contribute.

A zoologist, Tong Wu Yuan, explained how otters are not that different from locals: “Otters are just like Gen Y Singaporean youths. Except they can swim better, enjoy the great outdoors, are generally smaller, eat lesser, are sociable and can even live independently of adults.”

The otters are also assuring Singaporeans they will make pleasant neighbours.

One male otter, with three children said: “We promise we won’t cause trouble. We don’t spit, won’t talk loudly in public, won’t go on strike and won’t dilute the racial identity of minorities.”

“And if you want to cook curry, please go ahead. No complaints.”