Tag Archive | "national service"

Khaw Boon Wan to stay in HDB flat for 5 years as part of National Service call-up

Khaw Boon Wan to stay in HDB flat for 5 years as part of National Service call-up

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Lower-income heartland Singaporeans look forward to mingling with him.

khaw-boon-wan-bak-chang

A National Service call-up notification alert has been sent National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan.

This after he said on MediaCorp’s Chinese-language station Capital 95.8FM for a live radio talk show on June 23, 2015, that staying in a HDB flat for five years is like males serving NS for two years, which will help nation-building and interaction with the community.

Singaporeans from all walks of life, particularly those who have served NS for two years and who are staying in HDB flats all their lives, said they are excited to hear this news.

One Singaporean, Cheng Hu Chu, said: “I have been serving NS my whole life. In fact, I have served NS twice: Once when I enlisted when I was 18 years old and since young I have been staying in a HDB flat ever since.”

“So that means I’ve done my reservist training twice also, in this case.”

“It is great to see ministers move into HDB flats and serve NS with regular Singaporeans side-by-side and interact with the community.”

“Or else, ministers will not understand what commoners go through in their daily lives because Bukit Timah bungalows don’t offer this kind of perspectives.”

“I hope to see more PAP ministers go for NS soon, in particular, Lee Hsien Loong.”

 

 

 

 

 





Khaw Boon Wan receives National Service call-up, to stay in HDB flat for 5 years

Khaw Boon Wan receives National Service call-up, to stay in HDB flat for 5 years

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This will help him mingle with lower-income heartland Singaporeans.

khaw-boon-wan-bak-chang

National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan has received his National Service call-up notification.

This after he said on MediaCorp’s Chinese-language station Capital 95.8FM for a live radio talk show on June 23, 2015, that staying in a HDB flat for five years is like males serving NS for two years, which will help nation-building and interaction with the community.

Singaporeans from all walks of life, particularly those who have served NS for two years and who are staying in HDB flats all their lives, said they are excited to hear this news.

One Singaporean, Cheng Hu Chu, said: “I have been serving NS my whole life. In fact, I have served NS twice: Once when I enlisted when I was 18 years old and since young I have been staying in a HDB flat ever since.”

“So that means I’ve done my reservist training twice also, in this case.”

“It is great to see ministers move into HDB flats and serve NS with regular Singaporeans side-by-side and interact with the community.”

“Or else, ministers will not understand what commoners go through in their daily lives because Bukit Timah bungalows don’t offer this kind of perspectives.”

“I hope to see more PAP ministers go for NS soon, in particular, Lee Hsien Loong.”

 

Khaw Boon Wan is an excellent speaker:

S’poreans agree with Khaw Boon Wan: ‘We can’t remember the last time anyone used religion to make money’

Numerous PAP MPs put on 24-hour suicide watch after Khaw Boon Wan said commit suicide because of lapses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans see through Amos Yee’s grand plan: Doing everything he can to get out of NS

S’poreans see through Amos Yee’s grand plan: Doing everything he can to get out of NS

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That is the goal, they believe.

amos-yee-composite

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who think conspiratorially, have looked at one another with a side glance and nodded knowingly.

This after they came to the enlightened realisation that teenage anarchist Amos Yee might be doing everything he is currently doing to get out of serving his National Service stint.

The 16-year-old, who is out of school, will most likely be due for NS call-up soon.

One Singaporean, Hock Kian Peng, who served as a store man during NS because he always has an unexplained pain in his knee and reports sick often to get Attend C from the Medical Officer, said: “I have seen all kinds of things before when I went to report sick, but this one, this one is special.”

“This kind is confirm chao keng. Keng until to the max. Keng until Medical Board. Keng until Pes F. Like that you think got any unit dare to let him handle rifle?”

“There is really no other explanation that can account for this behaviour. This one seems hell bent on something else altogether. Not just normal deliquency, not just truancy or sexual frustration.”

“And this one seems too well-planned.”

“If he pulls it off, he will be the most chao keng kia in Singapore’s history of chao keng kias.”

 

Amos Yee under the microscope:

Religious letter writer writes to Amos Yee ex-bailor Vincent Law after molest accusation: ‘Turn the other cheek’

Amos Yee held in remand was the best thing that happened to his prison cell mates in a while

Shadowy State manipulated Amos Yee to make molest allegation, turn on his own side

S’pore bestowed with new martyr as Amos Yee found guilty & convicted

 

 

 

 

 











S’porean females to serve in S’pore Airlines as S’pore Girls as part of 2-year National Service

S’porean females to serve in S’pore Airlines as S’pore Girls as part of 2-year National Service

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Females will then get to contribute their part in one of the toughest vocations known to women in Singapore.

sq-girls

After days of deliberation, Parliament has passed a new National Service For Woman (NSFW) bill making it compulsory for all the females aged 18 years and above in Singapore to serve in Singapore Airlines for two years.

Aviation Minister Fang Fei Ji, told a packed House: “The Cabinet has been thinking how girls can serve Singapore and the tipping point came last week when an ex-SQ flight stewardess pointed out the cons of her stint in Singapore Airlines.”

“It sounds just like my army experience, but tougher. So, we decided we might as well make it compulsory for females to serve in Singapore Airlines, so that our girls can also enjoy tax breaks and in-camp training.”

He added that the regimental style of Singapore Airlines, such as stewardesses not being allowed to smoke or buy kopi from kopitiam in their kebayas, and the playing of of rank and power politics, were similar to how NS life is like for full-time National Servicemen from all vocations.

Women from all walks of life, who still think becoming an air stewardess is glamourous, are cheering this move.

Air stewardess wannabe Ai Dong Gua, who stands at just 1.5 metres, said: “Finally I get to become an SQ girl after I’ve been rejected the last 10 times because of my height. I’m looking forward to serving Straits Times and coke to Economy Class passengers!”

Another reject, Chi Tai Duo said: “Now that it’s compulsory, I hope they can make 2XL kebayas for me. I look forward to working in Business Class as I was told that the passengers don’t eat their meals there. I hope they allow me to finish the wonderful in-flight meals as it is a sin not to eat them.”

As part of the regimented training, the chao recruits will fly to Sydney daily and must be on standby for three months.

Once they passed out, they will serve in the Hong Kong flights, which have the highest number of complaints.

 

Being a Singapore Girl is tough:

10 ways passengers can help make S’pore Airlines stewardesses’ job on board SQ flights easier

NSFs apologise to ex-SIA stewardess Hilary: ‘We’re sorry you had a hard life in SQ’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Thousands of S’porean men say they feel very harassed by MINDEF, especially during NS

Thousands of S’porean men say they feel very harassed by MINDEF, especially during NS

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This after MINDEF said they feel harassed by a Singaporean Son.

dig-trench-NS

Tens of thousands of Singaporean boys and men from all walks of life who are still serving or have served National Service, have come out to publicly say they feel very harassed by the Ministry of Defence.

This after MINDEF said they feel harassed by a local inventor, Dr Ting Choon Meng, who made some statements, which were deemed worthy enough to have the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) send a lawyer’s letter to him, and which could see the Protection from Harassment Act used against him.

One Singaporean Son, Zho Peng Leow, said MINDEF coming out to admit they feel harassed gave him the courage to also come out to admit he used to feel harassed all the time in NS by MINDEF: “I always felt harassed by MINDEF because I had to do whatever they told me to do and I’m always threatened with punishment if I disobeyed orders.”

“In NS, everyday I was asked to knock it down and do push-ups over minor infringements. I had to stay in. Cut off all my hair. Many times I lacked sleep. Sometimes I do push-ups have to count from minus five to 20, which is a no-no because it is stipulated that soldiers must only do 20 push-ups maximum. So I definitely felt harassed.”

Another Singaporean Son, said he felt even more harassed when he and his platoon were punished even when they followed orders during NS: “I felt very harassed in NS because we were always asked to touch the tree and come back and keep dropping to do push-ups, even when we did what we were told.”

“I honestly felt the most harassed when I was outfield and asked to dig trench. Then after that still kena tekan.”

Other Singaporean Sons said the harassment they experienced can last for many, many years even after they have served NS.

Qu Ah Tee, a NSmen who is not even halfway through his seven high-key and three low-key reservist cycle, said he feels harassed every year as he needs to go back to camp for two to three weeks, take IPPT and if he fails, go complete RT: “This is long-term harassment. You thought the harassment will end with the end of NS. But no. It will carry on. You will keep feeling harassed for at least 10 more years of your life.”

 

More stories about Singaporean Sons feeling harassed:

NSF recruits say monthly SAF allowance of $480 is ‘not derisory enough’

$10,000 notes phased out in S’pore as they are not derisory enough

AMARE: ‘Not giving benefits to NSmen same as closing down shopping centres to women’

AMARE: ‘Not giving benefits to NSmen same as closing down shopping centres to women’

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It is against human rights.

orchard-313

Local men’s rights group AMARE (Association of Men for Action and Reaction) has hit back against self-declared women’s rights association, AWARE.

This after AWARE said this past week that NSmen should not be given enhanced housing, healthcare and education benefits just because they have served National Service and many years of reservist training.

This stirred anger online because this is tantamount to denying men payback for two years of sacrifice.

Akshun Bayday, president of the men’s rights group, has since joined the discussion and said there is a need to explain things in a context women understand: “For women, we need to explain it this way: Stopping benefits for NSmen is akin to closing down shopping centres for women. How would women feel if they didn’t have the basic right of going to shopping centres because there weren’t any?”

The men’s rights leader also said there is no use pushing AWARE to advocate women taking up National Service if they really wanted equality.

Bayday said: “Think about it this way: If Singaporean men did not do National Service to protect the country in the first place, will there be so many shopping centres for women to go to?”

S’porean boys seek MP Zainudin Nordin for help to defer NS

S’porean boys seek MP Zainudin Nordin for help to defer NS

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His Meet-The-People Sessions expected to hit full house every week.

NS? Never heard of it.

NS? Never heard of it.

Singaporean boys from all households and income levels are seeking Bishan-Toa Payoh PAP MP Zainudin Nordin for help.

They are asking him to help them defer their National Service stint forever, after finding out that he had not served NS but watched Ah Boys To Men and pretended to know what it feels like to do the real thing.

One 17-year-old Singaporean boy, Mai Zho Peng, said: “If my MP can do it, I don’t see why I can’t. After all, he can be a role model and he represents all Singaporeans, right?”

Singaporeans who have initially sought help from other venues are now turning to MP Zainudin instead.

One mother, Jin Chao Keng, said: “That time I go ask the Pasir Ris-Punggol MP Janil Puthucheary, no use one, ex-Malaysian.”

She continued: “But now I know the secret to success already. Don’t do NS can become MP next time!”

More S’poreans want to become foreigners to enjoy higher quality of life

More S’poreans want to become foreigners to enjoy higher quality of life

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Because foreigners have lesser responsibilities, more opportunities.

More Singaporeans want to become foreigners. Because foreigners deemed more sexy, got less responsibility and are more in demand. Except try not to be like Sun Ho.

More Singaporeans want to become foreigners. Because foreigners deemed more sexy, got less responsibility and are more in demand. Except try not to be like Sun Ho.

With the recent talk about expanding Singapore’s population to 7 million inhabitants and counting, Singaporeans are increasingly expressing their desire to turn themselves into foreigners — if possible — to enjoy a higher quality of life here.

The reasons provided by such Singaporeans are aplenty, as New Nation learnt.

One foreigner-wannabe Singaporean, Ang Moh Quee, said: “As a foreigner, I don’t need to do National Service. Look what a PAP MP mooted on Facebook: In the future, if you are a foreigner setting down roots here, you can just pay some money. And watch the local boys waste two years of their lives, ‘serving the nation’.”

Others, are convinced that being a foreigner will spell more opportunities career-wise.

Another foreigner-aspirant Singaporean, Wai Guo Ren, said: “As a foreigner, the government will automatically think you are better than locals. And even the locals will think that you are better than them.”

He continued: “Look at Stephanie Sun. She is not even true-blue foreigner. But an overseas stint made her more popular back home here, where no one initially gave a rat’s buttocks about her when she first started out.”

However, there are others with a clear head and kind heart who point out that such logic and thinking is not right.

Cindy Shan Liang, a true-blue Singaporean patriot said: “Look at Pastor Kong Hee’s wife, Sun Ho. Went to US to become a Japanese geisha, but still not popular in Singapore what.”

National Service necessary to protect foreigners

National Service necessary to protect foreigners

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Non-locals need Singaporeans to hold the fort because they can’t.

From Kementah.blogspot.com

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong paid tribute on Monday to 900,000 Singaporean men who have donned a uniform to serve in the military, civil defence or police force.

Almost heartfelt but not really, Our Dear Leader’s recognition of the efforts of male Singaporeans was actually to announce that the Government is dangling $100 million worth of vouchers and free NSmen club memberships. Each serviceman will get $50 to $100 worth of vouchers.

Why the sudden reward, no one knows.

Because most of it, nevertheless, will come to nothing as no one bothers or knows what to do with them vouchers since it is not liquid cash.

PM Lee also said that National Service is part of the Singapore identity. He believes this will help unite Singaporeans.

I mean, sure, this undoubtedly leaves Singaporeans feeling sympathetic for foreigners. Who are able to come to Singapore to buy property, such as condominiums.

And live a sheltered life, excluded from serving NS — which involves rolling in the mud, wearing leaves and eating combat ration.

How horrible it is that foreigners have to suffer such fate and be left out.

One Singaporean patriot, Hen Ai Guo, who completed his NS stint, plus seven high-key and three low-key reservist obligations and stays in a three-room flat, said: “Singapore requires Singaporeans to serve National Service because foreigners can’t. Because if we don’t protect the country, foreigners cannot buy condominiums at sky high prices. And rent them out for profit.”

“This helps to keep property prices stable, as our government believes.”

Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

Make NS compulsory for serious S’pore PR applicants

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Proposal by research fellow is to formalise the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Why do Singaporeans resent the influx of foreigners?

There are two reasons: One, foreigners compete for jobs, cause strains to our transportation network and health-care infrastructure, and are perceived to have caused reduced housing and education opportunities.

Two, locals see their standing and ethos eroded by the growing number foreigners and will react by defensively protecting their values and heritage.

However, in a study conducted by the Reach Policy Study Workgroup two years ago, the main bugbear in the local-foreign divide is the issue of National Service.

The Institute of Policy Studies produced the same finding in a recent study.

The heart of the issue? Singaporeans are dismayed not all immigrants are enlisted.

And to compound the problem, second-generation permanent residents can renounce their residency to avoid NS.

Some male offspring of PRs reportedly delay becoming residents until they are past enlistment age.

Plus, it has even been revealed last November by the Ministry of Defence that one-third of NS-liable 18-year-old PRs chose to give up their residency and not fulfill their NS obligations.

Therefore, it is the duty of policymakers to address the issue of inequality in serving National Service, be it a real or perceived issue of unequal treatment.

The fact is that Singaporeans who complete full-time NS are still liable to be recalled for duties, putting them at a disadvantage in the area of their work and profession.

Therefore, it should be made mandatory for children who want to attain permanent residency to serve NS.

The proposal is to remove the choice given to PRs, and formalising the process of making sure permanent residency is handed out only if NS obligations are met.

Foreigners who wish to apply for permanent residency for their children should be counselled by immigration officers and given a realistic preview of NS before submitting applications.

Parents would then have to put up a security bond if they really want to apply PR for their children.

The money will be forfeited if they do not want to serve NS eventually.

This works the same way as Singaporean parents who put up a security bond of their son who goes overseas to study.

If he doesn’t return by 18 years old to serve, the security bond is forfeited.

The money recovered by the state can be viewed as a return of any benefits in education or other subsidies enjoyed by the son.

This is a 60-second reduction of the original article published in The Straits Times on May 9, 2012, by Leong Chan-Hoong, a research fellow at the Institute of Policy Studies, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, NUS.

Editor’s note: Doesn’t addressing the NS issue only affect, at best, half of the PR applicants? The issue is certainly more complex after glancing past the superficial surface if we consider that ladies can apply to be Singapore PR without serving NS and can end up doing jobs that local men do as well.

Like ‘hell on earth’

Like ‘hell on earth’

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An autistic Singaporean describes what he feels is the despondent situation that people like him experience daily.

By Aaron Kok, for the writing contest.

The Autism awareness ribbon. BLW PHOTOGRAPHY / Creative Commons

The Autism awareness ribbon. BLW PHOTOGRAPHY / Creative Commons

IT’S A hard life being a Singaporean and autistic at the same time. We have to live through a lifetime of disappointments, pain and discrimination.

Our parents do not have the money, the time, or the know-how to give us a full and comprehensive treatment that could maximize our potential. We have to go through speech, play, exercise, and whatever therapy, just for a silver lining of hope.

But hope? In what way is there hope?

I only know that our parents’ hope of an early, well-deserved retirement is gone – because they’ll most probably have to work harder and much longer, to take care of us even if we are high functioning (which I am). Some parents even divorce as a result.

In school, we suffered greatly. We do not have the social skills to get around attacks: verbal, physical or mental. Bullies see us as the lower species, judging our intelligence from our behavior, which we have no control over. This is made worse by the media who portray autistics as people who will never be on par with normal people.

We autistics eventually develop low self-esteem, or a “me against the world” attitude. Unfortunately, the anti-bullying campaign started very late. But even now, some schools do not implement it.

Hearing stories from other autistics, I say the anti-bullying program was a failure. Thus Singapore has several generations of kids who will grow up into teenagers and adults and end up in jail or the Institute of Mental Health. Most of these are not even autistic!

I still wonder why did our country’s leader sent his autistic son to an international school that normal Singaporean can never attend. It’s simply not fair that he goes to some international school where they have facilities to accommodate autistics, while WE suffer so much in the mainstream counterparts.

He claims that our mainstream school cannot facilitate his son’s education. Then he, as leader of the country, should implement change in the mainstream education system to accommodate both his son and us! I say it’s only fair that all of us autistics should be allowed a part in the mainstream life.

School was living hell for us. They instituted compulsory co-curricular activities which we are neither interested nor up to the task. There should be a more choices for all, normal and autistics.

I am lucky to have survived NS with the help of supportive superiors. But lots of autistics are not that lucky. They are bullied, harassed, and even beaten up while traveling home.

Autistics can contribute to society by doing what they are talented in, from art and science to even obscure interests like stamps or chess. (Very few schools outside the elite schools have such CCAs.) So our teachers hammer us, trying to fit a square peg into a round hole.

The system forces Singaporean students, autistic or not, to do Project Work at both polytechnics and Junior Colleges. This is where we are victims of political maneuvering. They gang up on their autistic classmates to take credit for their hard work and to falsify their peer appraisals against us.

Despite their disability, autistics are hardworking and dedicated in their work. It’s not fair for our classmates to do this.
For males, life is worse. All of us are subjected to two years of brainwashing and physical torture; National Service. I bring the reader’s attention to male autistic Singaporeans because males constitute three quarters of the autistic population globally.

I am lucky to have survived NS with the help of supportive superiors. But lots of autistics are not that lucky. They are bullied, harassed, and even beaten up while traveling home. To think the perpetrators are grown men, who behave like school children who don’t grow up. One autistic, who also survived NS like me, even told me that there are many gang members in the SAF. All these are telling signs that NS is not for us autistics, definitely.

Our society does not allow flexibility in autistics serving our country. Hence, there is a tendency that some autistics may not be able to withstand the rigors of NS. They either serve NS dutifully, whilst suffering in the process, or be exempted, or even expelled like a few of my friends.

When one is expelled or exempted from NS, he will be at a disadvantage. Society discriminates against people who do not serve NS, labeling them ‘chao keng’ or ‘wuss’. These derogatory remarks do not serve any purpose, other than showing society’s ignorance and nonchalance towards the challenges we autistics have to face, day in and day out.

Our employment situation is dire. I do not have objective statistics myself, but to my own estimates, no autistic I know is gainfully employed in a job that makes full use of his or her capabilities to the fullest.

We are mostly either stuck in dead-end jobs, or are not promoted to positions at the same pace neurotypicals, or non-autistics. One autistic (whom requested not to be named or identified) told me that he is in his line of job for nine years, and yet there’s no prospects of further training or career advancement. As such, he is in despair.

I believe other adult Singaporean autistics, who have the ability to work, also feels the same.

In addition, the civil service has no clear public indication that autistics like me, even with their sub-par social skills, have a place to contribute to them. Where can we find our jobs?

Our society has to be more gracious and more sympathetic not only autistics but to those with disabilities. Until then, I have put in motion plans to leave this tiny island that some call home.

But I call it Hell on Earth.

The author is a 23-year-old Singaporean, diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. He is out of NS and looking for a job. ‘Aaron Kok’ is a pseudonym.

Editor’s note: We will be inviting Denise Phua, MP for Jalan Besar GRC and supervisor of the Pathlight School, to respond to this article. Readers who would like to share their experiences and insights can also contribute to the comments section below or they can write to us at .

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Ace of bass

Ace of bass

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A rugged full-time National Serviceman displays a softer side.

By Sujith Kumar

AS I briskly walk along the corridors at Battalion Headquarters of the 40th Singapore Armoured Regiment, a foreign sound strains the air – do I hear violins, horns and pianos?

Intrigued, I enter the room from which it seems to originate, and find a rugged, broad-shouldered soldier with rolled-up fatigues swaying to symphonic music, his fingers in the air as if conducting an orchestra, oblivious to his colleague’s bewildered stares.

This is a guy I’d like to get to know, and so I say hello.

Benjamin Goh, 19, a full-time National Serviceman (NSF), is quite the character. “Call me Ben”, he insists with a firm handshake, and you dare not refuse.

Ben attributes who he is today to three things: his family, life experiences and music. As he talks about his past, it is hard to believe that the ruggedly built, self-assured man seated before me once had painfully low self-esteem and was bullied over his weight.

But he has his weight problem to thank for introducing him to the instrument that has defined him for nearly a decade.

Ben’s journey with the double bass began when he was ten. His school had just bought a double bass for its Chinese orchestra and concluded that it needed someone ‘big’ to play it.

“My teacher urged me to try out for the part. It didn’t feel good to be recognised for being fat,” he says. But he tried out anyway.

After two tries, he eventually got into the Singapore National Youth Orchestra (SNYO), a National Project of Excellence led by the Ministry of Education.

Today, while he is no longer a student, he still plays an active part with the SNYO and is serving his second term as principal bassist. His work with the SNYO was further validated when he was picked to join the prestigious Asian Youth Orchestra earlier this year – an achievement only one percent of applicants get to realise.

“I appealed to the authorities many times but kept getting rejected, though I had the support of my superiors and several ministers.” – Benjamin Goh

Unfortunately, he was unable to participate due to military commitments.

“I appealed to the authorities many times but kept getting rejected, though I had the support of my superiors and several ministers. I don’t understand – it would have been such an honour for me and Singapore to represent the country”, he says, betraying just a sliver of regret.

The consummate musician with two music performance diplomas under his belt is so passionate about the orchestra and of classical music that his friends fondly remember him.

Fellow bassist Sandra Lim, 19, says, “Ben’s a charismatic leader. He’s patient and doesn’t hesitate to take the back seat to let others shine. Most of all, he commands respect.”

She continues, “That being said, he does embarrassing things like dancing with his bass while the conductor is conducting, or singing out loud and ignoring everyone else’s stares!”

The topic changes to his family, and Ben gets visibly emotional.

“There was once, when I was in kindergarten, my father came back for work and took the effort to ask how my day went. I was touched that he bothered to take the time to listen to me. He treated me like I was important, and still does.”

His eyes well up but he makes no effort to regain his composure.

“My parents have always been so encouraging. When relatives come together, they smile and talk about me proudly. Mom just wants me to enjoy life. In fact, she said that just passing my A Levels would be enough.”

He ended up doing so well that he received a government scholarship that would fully subsidise his studies overseas.

“Their voices are the most magical things in the world,” he says in a strained voice that becomes nearly inaudible towards the end.

He finally acknowledges his display of emotion with a wry smile, “I never cried until I was three months old, and now I tear more often than other guys! What I hope people would understand is that crying doesn’t show that you’re weak, it just shows that you care.”

Besides family and music, Ben has kept himself busy with a host of activities. He was a member of his high school’s basketball team and student council.

At that time, the basketball team had a reputation for poor discipline, so Ben, as captain, decided to be firm. “I began cracking down on this, so you can imagine I wasn’t liked. The guys used to hang out all the time after practice, but I couldn’t join them because I had to rush for SNYO practice right after training, so I was really quite a loner,” he says.

Ben is certainly known for many things. But how would he like to be remembered?

“If I died now, I’d want people to remember me as a guy who fought against many odds, who worked hard to make his house a home, a guy who was not afraid to express his own opinions while listening to those around him.”

The interview ends. He puts on his boots halfway, not caring to put them on fully, and waddles along the corridor in a most unsoldierlike way, once again showing that he doesn’t care if people think of him as peculiar and bizarre, once again proving that he doesn’t live by the validations of others.