Tag Archive | "maintenance"

S’pore experiments with 28-hour days to give SMRT more time each day to maintain tracks

S’pore experiments with 28-hour days to give SMRT more time each day to maintain tracks

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This is to address the problem of lack of downtime for maintenance.

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In a bid to ensure 70 percent of Singaporeans from all walks of life get the Singapore they deserve, Singapore is implementing 28-hour days in place of regular 24-hour ones.

This after the government vowed to give SMRT sufficient time to maintain its tracks, by making full use of the strong mandate given by the people.

The Singapore government discovered that by adding four additional hours a day to the traditional globally-recognised 24-hour cycle, it is much easier than expecting SMRT to fix its tracks on time over a few hours overnight.

One government spokesperson, Gan Shi Jian, said: “If we cannot fix the track, we might as well fix time itself.”

“This way, SMRT will be able to tackle the problem at its root, which is really, a lack of time.”

“And by having 28-hour days, we are also effectively extending the time before the next General Election in 2020 arrives.”

Singaporeans who heard of this plan said they are supportive of it.

One local, Bao Fo Jiao, said: “Not doing much to maintain the tracks the past 20 years and trying to do everything now feels a lot like last minute grab Buddha leg.”

 

 

 

 

 











Straits Times gains upper hand over The Messiah hacker, goes back to print only

Straits Times gains upper hand over The Messiah hacker, goes back to print only

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Sly move thwarts the hacker’s next move.

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In a dangerous escalating game of one-upmanship, the national broadsheet The Straits Times has tossed in the ultimate trump card: They are reverting back to printed newspapers only in a bid to thwart The Messiah hacker.

Torrent Hernandez, the editor said: “Neh neh ni boo boo, you cannot hack me.”

And focusing on the print product will also allow ST to improve on the newspaper’s quality.

One vegetable seller, Mai Pang Cai, said: “I used to buy Straits Times in the past because the paper was thick and absorbent, wrap vegetable that time, very good.”

“Nowadays the paper too thin and too much colouring, not good.”

However, on a more serious note, ST could contemplate going to the courts.

A lawyer, Jiang Fa Lui, said ST should consider suing their website designer and content management system builder: “If a showroom sold you a car without car locks, would you buy it?”

“Likewise, shouldn’t you be mad at the website builder who sold you a website that could be broken into so easily?”