Tag Archive | "fertility"

S’poreans want to have children immediately after seeing colourful fertility ads in MRT station

S’poreans want to have children immediately after seeing colourful fertility ads in MRT station

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Ads like these are super effective in changing minds.

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who are delaying having children because it is too expensive and half the time they cannot even take care of themselves, are declaring that they are going to have children immediately as they have changed their minds.

This after they saw colourful advertisements in a MRT station reminding them about their fertility and the joys of having children at a young age.

One Singaporean, Sheng Hai Zi, said: “I felt this urge to have children straightaway the moment I saw this mind-changing advertisement in the MRT telling me I have limited number of eggs in my lifetime.”

“Nothing spurs me more to find a husband and to have my eggs fertilised than an ad telling me I’m running out of time.”

“The authorities sure are able to persuade the population very well with rainbow colours.”

Other Singaporeans said this was no doubt a very good idea that had been put together after spending a lot of time conceptualising it.

Mei Tou Nao, another local, said: “This is by far the best initiative I have ever seen. It is as good as the campaign to remind Singaporeans not to litter at Laneway when it is held at Gardens By The Bay.”

“I’m sure such messaging will have an impact and change society.”

“There is no way such a campaign can fail because it is so super effective.”

 

 

 

 

 











His Leeness: Singapore needs more babies

His Leeness: Singapore needs more babies

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Or else, fewer new cars, stereos, computers, iPhones, iPads and clothes will be sold.

Hmmm and His Leeness once said "Two is enough" before...

Women in developed countries today are as educated and well-paid as men.

This makes women less socially and economically dependent on people of the other gender and more likely to remain single.

If she marries someone with a dong, it’s only because that person must add value to her life. Or she desires to have children.

In the developed world, this turn of events is creating massive changes in the United States and Western European countries.

The reproduction rate that is keeping the population stable is below the 2.1 level.

And Singapore’s experience is no different.

The fertility rate for the Chinese segment is the lowest at 1.08.

For Indians, it is 1.09. For Malays, it is 1.64.

This means that the size of each successive generation of Chinese Singaporeans will halve in the next 18 to 20 years.

Women putting off having children has drastic implications on Singapore.

For one, less children means the burden of taking care of the elderly will be greater.

Last year, seven working adults supported one retiree.

By 2030, 2.3 working adults will have to support one retiree.

Low fertility and an ageing population would mean we are dependent on immigrants to make up our numbers.

Without them, Singapore will face the prospect of a shrinking workforce and a stagnant economy.

Fewer younger people means fewer new cars, stereos, computers, iPhones, iPad and clothes will be sold, not to mention fewer customers to partake in fine dining.

Ancillary businesses will take a hit.

The Singapore government is encouraging marriage and parenthood through incentives: The aim is to encourage parents to have three or four or more children.

This is a 60-second reduction of the original article published in The Straits Times on May 9, 2012 by Lee Kuan Yew that first appeared in this month’s Forbes Magazine.