Tag Archive | "ban"

S’pore to ban smoking at home

S’pore to ban smoking at home

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Each neighbourhood will have one designated yellow box to serve every 1,000 smokers.

smoking-ban-at-home

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe giving up their individual liberties until they have very little left but made to feel like things have progressed, are nodding their heads appreciatively.

This after they agree banning smoking in parks and reservoirs is the right thing to do and the next step the authorities must take is to ban smoking at home as well.

This means that no one is allowed to smoke indoors in one’s own house at any time of the day in a bid to make Singaporeans healthier and Singapore smoke-free.

But to cater to those who still want to puff their cancer sticks, each neighbourhood will have one designated yellow box in place to serve every 1,000 smokers.

A health authority, Sio Hoon Kee, said: “As there is only one designated smoking corner located at a different, non-permanent location each day in each neighbourhood, smokers will have to hike throughout their estate to find it.”

“This will greatly aid smokers in their exercise regime and ensure they at least get to break some sweat.”

Other locals said enforcement of this law is the key to prevent smokers from lighting up at home.

Another Singaporean, Bao Toh Kia, said: “The authorities will then have to hire more officers to be located in each and every household to conduct hourly spot checks.”

“This will greatly increase the number of public servants in Singapore and cut down on the unemployment rate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’pore lion dance troupes play piano to ensure drums don’t cause public disturbance

S’pore lion dance troupes play piano to ensure drums don’t cause public disturbance

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They are willing to cope with string instruments as long as Singapore is safe and harmonious.

lion-dance-piano

Lion dance troupes in Singapore are putting their trademark drum sets and cymbals away, starting this Chinese New Year.

Instead of relying on loud banging and crashing sounds during performances that could potentially flout the law, many dance troupes said they are performing piano renditions of classic lion dance tunes to keep up with Singapore’s anti-public disturbance laws.

Wu Shi, one of the leading lion dance troupe members, said he is not worried that choreographing dance moves using piano tunes will change the feel of the performance and an abandonment of tradition: “In the past, we have seen the news of drums being banned during Thaipusam. This has made us realised that drums are potentially violent instruments that can unleash the baser instincts in humans.”

“As we are aware that drumming could be banned in other areas as they can be deemed to potentially flout the law, we have taken the first step of keeping up with the times by using pianos instead.”

“Furthermore, it is already not fair to make Indians feel privileged in Singapore by banning drumming previously. All races must face bans when it comes to drumming, so that all races can feel privileged at the same time.”

At press time, concert organisers in Singapore have confirmed that all live acts performing in Singapore from this month onward will have to do so without percussion or any identifiable drum kit.

 

 

 

 

 











S’pore to become smoke-free island by 2017

S’pore to become smoke-free island by 2017

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Only three mobile outdoor smoking points will be available at any given time.

nee-soon-smoking-point

As the authorities are looking at raising the minimum legal age for buying and using tobacco from 18 to 21 and restricting the sale of flavoured tobacco products, such as menthol cigarettes, Singapore is planning on going smoke-free by 2017.

This means that no one is allowed to smoke outdoors publicly at any time of the day in a bid to make Singaporeans healthier.

But to cater to those who still want to puff their cancer sticks, a grand total of three designated smoking points will be allocated on the whole island.

Each designated smoking area will be three-by-three metres and have walls to hold smokers in. And they will all be mobile.

A health authority, Sio Hoon Kee, said the reason for this is simple: “As there are only three designated smoking corners for up to two and a half million smokers in Singapore, it is essential that we space them out and move them around so everyone can use it.”

There will not be a fixed schedule as to where the smoking points will be located next and it is not known how many areas it will cover in a day.

However, anyone caught smoking outdoors outside the perimeter of the designated smoking corners will be punished by being banned from smoking and they will be ordered to carry the mobile smoking corner around for a week and become a passive second-hand smoker.

 

 

 

 

 











ST forum letter writer: Govt must ban cigarettes, smoking in S’pore

ST forum letter writer: Govt must ban cigarettes, smoking in S’pore

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He strongly believes that it can be done.

smoking-singapore

While I applaud the Ministry of Health’s (MOH) latest pre-emptive move to ban smokeless cigarettes in Singapore, I am disappointed that the Government did not leverage this opportunity to extend the ban to other forms of cigarettes as well (“Ban on smokeless cigarettes kicks in“; Dec 15).

According to the MOH press release, the Government is “banning emerging tobacco products as a pre-emptive measure to protect public health against the known and potential harms of such products”.

Going by that objective, I am perplexed that the ban was not extended to include cigarettes, which can also produce second-hand smoke to affect people nearby.

The Government has, thus far, taken a two-pronged approach of educating the public and expanding the number of places where smoking is prohibited.

These measures are important but insufficient to protect the public from the ill effects of smoking.

I urge the Government to have a clear timeline of imposing a ban on smoking in Singapore if it intends to do so eventually.

This timeline would give smokers and retailers time to adjust their habits and business models, respectively. It would also clarify the Government’s intent and resolve in protecting Singaporeans from the effects of smoking.

The vision of a smoke-free Singapore need not end up in smoke and can happen with bold policymaking in the interests of all Singaporeans.

Tham Tuck Meng

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times Forum on Dec. 15, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 











Experts more harmful than shisha, S’poreans agree

Experts more harmful than shisha, S’poreans agree

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Experts like to pontificate, paid to be biased and don’t know much.

shisha-smoker-singapore

Singaporeans from all walks of life who are immune to nonsense agree collectively that experts are more harmful than shisha.

This after some experts said shisha is more harmful than cigarettes and therefore, its ban in Singapore is justified.

However, Singaporeans who take what experts say with a pinch of salt, said they do so because they know people touted as experts can be asked to comment on certain issues to push or support the official government agenda.

Jiang Fei Hua, a local, said: “Experts are experts for a reason: To justify certain decisions on the government’s behalf that are really political decisions.”

“All these news reports to change your mind is planted by the government agencies. We all know shisha is banned because they don’t bring in enough tax money compared to cigarettes.”

“And the regulation of the shisha industry is not worth the effort because it is so small.”

“If the government and Ministry of Health is really concerned about Singaporeans’ health, they would have banned cigarettes a long time ago. But they didn’t.”

“This sends the message to the people that the government is really pragmatic and practical when it comes to making money.”

 

Singaporeans are smart:

Deep down inside, S’poreans know M1, StarHub & Singtel all equally suck

Future Music Festival Asia might not proceed in S’pore as electronic music can cause drug-taking

Future Music Festival Asia might not proceed in S’pore as electronic music can cause drug-taking

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The police would then be inconvenienced as they have to arrest people and hang them later.

future-music-festival-asia-2015

Singapore looks set to ban live electronic music in public by disallowing Future Music Festival Asia 2015 from being held here after successfully banning eating and alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm.

Ad by Wikiproperty.co

Ad by Wikiproperty.co (Singapore)

This was after authorities believe drugs can spring a surprise appearance at the FMFA 2015 by circumventing Singapore’s tough anti-drug policing and death penalty laws.

However, Singaporeans who support the ban on electronic music said it is the only logical thing to do.

Xi Du Ping, a local, said: “People who listen to electronic music tend to take drugs. Same as how people who drink alcohol will riot even when they are feeling okay.”

“And when people take drugs, they will become a bum and a strain on society.”

“This will cause the police to be inconvenienced as they have to arrest people. And later on, when found guilty, have to hang them.”

“This will lead to further bad publicity for Singapore internationally, as we’d look like the Taliban for dishing out the death penalty.”

Other Singaporeans who are supportive of the ban said FMFA 2015 is unlike ZoukOut, which is allowed to happen every year.

One local, Jiang Dao Li, said: “ZoukOut is all Singapore needs. Because it is supported by the Singapore Tourism Board.”

 

Ban everything, Singapore:

S’pore to ban eating in public after banning alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm

A-Mei’s Rainbow song can spread homosexuality, S’pore authorities warn

Taylor Swift suspected of singing songs mocking S’pore authorities

S’pore lion dance troupes practising piano renditions of tunes as ban on drums could be extended

S’pore lion dance troupes practising piano renditions of tunes as ban on drums could be extended

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They are willing to cope with string instruments as long as Singapore is safe and harmonious.

lion-dance-piano

Lion dance troupes in Singapore are putting their trademark drum sets and cymbals away, starting this Chinese New Year.

Instead of relying on loud banging and crashing sounds during performances that could potentially flout the law, many dance troupes said they will start practising piano renditions of classic lion dance tunes to keep up with Singapore’s anti-drumming laws.

Singapore, this past week, arrested three people during Thaipusam because they were doing something against the law.

Wu Shi, one of the leading lion dance troupe members, said he is not worried that choreographing dance moves using piano tunes will change the feel of the performance and an abandonment of tradition: “The news of drums being banned during Thaipusam making the rounds these few days has made us realised that drums are potentially violent instruments that can unleash the baser instincts in humans.”

“As we are aware that drumming could be banned in other areas as they can be deemed to potentially flout the law, we have taken the first step of keeping up with the times by using pianos instead.”

“Furthermore, it is not fair to make Indians feel privileged in Singapore by banning drumming. All races must face bans when it comes to drumming, so that all races can feel privileged at the same time.”

At press time, concert organisers in Singapore have confirmed that all live acts performing in Singapore from this month onward will have to do so without percussion or any identifiable drum kit.

 

It’s all about the bass no drums:

Backstreet Boys renamed Backstreet Uncles to abide by S’pore’s strict anti-false advertising laws

Public drinking prohibitions not effective as 3 men arrested at Thaipusam still smelt of alcohol

 

 

 

 

 





Public drinking prohibitions not effective as 3 men arrested at Thaipusam still smelt of alcohol

Public drinking prohibitions not effective as 3 men arrested at Thaipusam still smelt of alcohol

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Singapore has failed all Singaporeans again.

thaipusam-arrests

 

Three men, aged between 28 and 33, arrested for rowdy behaviour at the annual Thaipusam procession on Tuesday, were said to have smelt of alcohol, according to the Singapore Police who revealed the details only a day later in a Facebook post on Feb. 4, 2015.

Their arrests came after the scuffle they were in ended with a policemen sent to hospital.

Police said its officers were sent to the junction of Serangoon Road and Desker Road at about 6:50pm that day, after a group there insisted on playing drums during Thaipusam, which was a natural thing to do during a ritual procession.

A law enforcement analyst said this incident clearly shows a failure of legislation to deal with the drinking problem in Singapore, that looks likely to spread island-wide as alcohol consumption is increasingly getting pushed underground.

Leah Pai Lang, a man who was drinking beer at the coffee shop, said: “The government has failed the citizenry again by not doing enough to stop people from drinking. These arrests clearly shows that there has been a complete failure to use a bigger sledgehammer to kill a fly.”

These arrests has come under the intense spotlight as they follow hot on the heels of legislation that had just been passed in parliament last week to ban the public consumption of alcohol after 10.30pm.

However, other Singaporeans had different interpretations of the arrests.

One local, Jiang Dao Li, said the arrests wouldn’t have happened if other factors were factored in: “The three men who were arrested wouldn’t have clashed with the police if the police weren’t there.”

Another local, Jiang Zhen De, concurred: “If there was no police, then there wouldn’t have been anyone to arrest the three men.”

“And then there wouldn’t have been any news of anyone smelling like alcohol.”

 

Singapore bans drinking and eating in public at night:

S’pore to ban eating in public after banning alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm

Alcohol failed to cause riot at Clark Quay the past year since Little India riot occurred

Foreign workers rioted because they were feeling okay

 

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S’pore to become smoke-free island by 2016

S’pore to become smoke-free island by 2016

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Only three mobile outdoor smoking points will be available at any given time.

nee-soon-smoking-point

After pushing through with legislation to successfully ban alcohol consumption, eating and travelling in public after 10.30pm, Singapore is planning on going smoke-free by 2016.

This means that no one is allowed to smoke outdoors publicly at any time of the day in a bid to make Singaporeans healthier.

But to cater to those who still want to puff their cancer sticks, a grand total of three designated smoking points will be allocated on the whole island.

Each designated smoking area will be three-by-three metres and have walls to hold smokers in. And they will all be mobile.

A health authority, Sio Hoon Kee, said the reason for this is simple: “As there are only three designated smoking corners for up to two and a half million smokers in Singapore, it is essential that we space them out and move them around so everyone can use it.”

There will not be a fixed schedule as to where the smoking points will be located next and it is not known how many areas it will cover in a day.

However, anyone caught smoking outdoors outside the perimeter of the designated smoking corners will be punished by being banned from smoking and they will be ordered to carry the mobile smoking corner around for a week and become a passive second-hand smoker.

 

Everything is banned in Singapore:

Government bans ’69’ sexual position

Cigarettes, alcohol completely sold out as S’pore announces plan to increase taxes from today

S’pore to ban eating in public after banning alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm

Tan Tock Seng Hospital to ban all staff from using Facebook, social media

 

 

 

 

 





S’pore to ban eating in public after banning alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm

S’pore to ban eating in public after banning alcohol consumption in public after 10.30pm

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Travelling in public and making love at night will also be banned soon.

drunk-clark-quay

In a bid to become a vibrant metropolis and the top city in the world, Singapore is banning the public consumption of alcohol after 10.30pm once the Liquor Control Bill is passed in parliament.

This means that no one is allowed to be seen drinking or holding alcohol in public after 10.30pm. Violators will be shot on sight and survivors will be shot repeatedly.

The ban on the public consumption of alcohol after 10.30pm will also mark the start of a series of prohibitions to follow: Once alcohol has been successfully banned in public at night, eating and travelling in public after 10.30pm will also be banned.

A government spokesperson, Lim Kah Tor, said: “Anything can be considered a vice these days. If you eat in public after 10.30pm, you will grow fat because your metabolism slows down at night.”

“And when you grow fat, you will block people’s way when you go out. For example, you can keep left on the escalator, but it looks like you are still keeping right.”

“This will cause tempers to flare and people will get annoyed, fight and a full scale racial riot will break out like in the 1960s. Plus, with alcohol, things will get worse.”

“So, to prevent such catastrophes, we need to monitor the situation and then stop people from eating and travelling at night after 10.30pm and impose martial law and curfews and wind down public transportation services before dark.”

Locals who heard of the new proposed measures said they are heartened that their lives will be made better and more interesting as a result.

One local, Pah Kah Luan, said: “No wonder people in Singapore more likely to riot these days.”

 

Alcohol is the cause of all problems in Singapore:

Alcohol failed to cause riot at Clark Quay the past year since Little India riot occurred

Foreign workers rioted because they were feeling okay

Cigarettes, alcohol completely sold out as S’pore announces plan to increase taxes from today

 

 

 

 

 





Complete ban on alcohol, food, water in Race Course Road this weekend

Complete ban on alcohol, food, water in Race Course Road this weekend

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Cutting off supplies of sustenance will prevent trouble.

race-course-road

There will be a complete ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol, food and water this coming weekend in the Race Course Road area where a riot broke out in Little India on Sunday night.

This is to prevent anyone who partakes of these sources of bodily sustenance to expend it by flipping things over and setting things on fire while running around making yodelling noises.

One shopkeeper in the Race Course Road area, Mai Tong Xi, said he approves of this idea as it is very fair and just and shows how Singapore treats foreigners equally: “Ya, I’m sure serving alcohol, food and water in Clark Quay is fine but not in Little India.”

AMARE seeks to ban ‘I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus’ Christmas song

AMARE seeks to ban ‘I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus’ Christmas song

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Men’s advocacy group against song as it promotes wanton behaviour and infidelity in women.

What kind of sick pervert will kiss a Santa Claus like this? Who else but Mommy, of course.

What kind of sick pervert will kiss a Santa Claus like this? Who else but Mommy, of course. This highlights the depth of the problem with ‘I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus’ Christmas song.

With Christmas round the corner, local men’s advocacy group AMARE (Association of Men for Action and Reaction) is seeking a blanket ban on the festive song I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus.

The group said they want the song to be censored forevermore not because it is annoying, but because it contains lyrics that promotes wanton behaviour in women, which causes infidelity leading to divorce and the subsequent collapse of the institution of marriage, bringing about economic decline and mass extinction of civilisation, which will compound the moment of Singularity where the Universe will implode causing The Big Crunch.

The I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus Christmas song is notable for its notoriety as it contains multiple lines of infidelity lyrics, that will influence the young to partake in high-risk, wanton behaviour and establish a cavalier attitude to monogamous sexual relationships:

I saw Mommy kissing Santa Claus
Underneath the mistletoe last night.
She didn’t see me creep
Down the stairs to have a peek
She thought I was tucked
Up in my bedroom fast asleep.

Then, I saw Mommy tickle Santa Claus
Underneath his beard so snowy white.
Oh, what a laugh it would have been,
If Daddy had only seen
Mommy kissing Santa Claus last night!

President of the men’s rights group, Akshun Bayday, said: “After we successfully ban this notorious Christmas song, we will ban the next song on our list: Oops I Did It Again by Britney Spears. This song is notable for vocalising the female’s insatiable appetite for sex.”

“And after that, we will ban all Taylor Swift songs, because she is clearly a wanton tart having dated multiple men in one short lifetime and discarding these very men, so that she can write pop songs for young people about these purposely failed relationships and profit from being unmarried and promiscuous.”