Finance minister and Singapore Democratic Party come out winners in political debate

Posted on 03 April 2011

Worker’s Party played it safe, Lina fumbled, and what’s-his-name was plain horrible. And yes, the moderator said “Domination Day” instead of “Nomination Day.”

By Terence Lee

BEWARE, the gods may not be smiling on certain opposition parties this General Election, especially if the slip-up by moderator Melissa Hyak towards the end of the one-hour debate is any indication.

Some conspiracy theorists will insist that this was a deliberate attempt to “prove” the show was uncut, but let’s not go there.

The debate, screened on Saturday on Channel NewsAsia, lasted an hour, which was way too short for me. Candidates rattled off their points quickly, racing one another in a sprint to the finish line. It makes for fun TV, but a good substantive debate? I don’t think so.

But in all honesty, I think the extra time might actually hurt some of the opposition reps. Mohamed Nazem Suki, assistant secretary-general of the Singapore Democratic Alliance (SDA), was a total embarrassment.

Unable to string together even a coherent sentence or two, you wonder how is what’s-his-name going to perform at the Rally or in Parliament, if he does get in by the slimmest chance?

Right now, I can’t even recall a single thing he said, and if I am a young voter getting introduced to the SDA for the first time, that’s a bad first impression.

Let’s hope he speaks better Malay.

Lina Chiam of the Singapore People’s Party emerged slightly better-off. The bad news is: She behaved like a slightly older Tin Pei Ling, the 27-year-old rookie PAP politician poked fun by netizens for her youthful exuberance.

Except that Pei Ling had more style, fashion-wise.

She often giggled nervously and sounded unsure, and there was even once where she appeared confused and zoned out. Melissa had to prompt her twice or thrice about the question of foreign workers before she rattled off a semi-coherent answer.

And God forbid, she attributed the quote “power corrupts absolutely” to her husband. Epic fail there.

To be fair to Lina: She did say some good things. But she needs a lot of polishing up if she wants to convince voters in Potong Pasir that she is a credible candidate.

Member-of-Parliament Josephine Teo comes across as being too… nice. While she has sure knowledge of the facts, she sounded like she was there to back Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam instead of standing on her own two feet.

Although she did okay at the beginning, she wasted her last two minutes of airtime going on a self-indulgent, off-topic ramble about the Singapore Story, and how it is co-authored by many people. Vincent Wijeysingha, assistant treasurer of the Singapore Democratic Party (SDP), questioned her assertion later on, remarking on how scores of opposition figures and activists were silenced unfairly.

As long as Vincent and Danny the Democratic Bear continue their outreach during the elections and after, I think SDP’s chances at the voting booth in this Election and the next will improve.

In a nutshell, Josephine might’ve been slaughtered if Tharman was not there.

On to Gerald Giam, a potential candidate for the Worker’s Party. True to form, he sounded like a foot soldier espousing the mantra of his party, starting every sentence with “The Worker’s Party believes that…”

I don’t think it’s awful; it’s just too safe. Which is what the Worker’s Party has become since Low Thia Khiang took the helm. Although he was calm and confident at the debate, much like Josephine, he could have spent more time talking about his party’s proposals on policy issues.

No doubt, he was right in saying that good Opposition is necessary in Parliament, but he seemed to have fallen back on that again and again, as if he had nothing else to say. Furthermore, he did not press home the point that despite having 33 percent of the votes, the Opposition only has three seats in Parliament.

I was also a bit surprised that he stopped his final ramble at the one-minute mark. Perhaps he felt he has done his job: Present Worker’s Party as a safe choice for voters. And by the way: We’re weaker than the People’s Action Party, we admit it.

Finally, we come to Tharman and Vincent. If I am the CEO of MediaCorp, I would allocate another one hour-show just for the two to slug it out, seriously.

While Vincent was the assertive bulldog raring for a fight, Tharman was the self-assured minister who appeared comfortable but not overbearing. He displayed some subtle command over the other candidates, exhorting everyone to think in Singapore’s best interest when it came to the issue of foreign workers. He reached out across the table to Gerald at times, praising the Worker’s Party for their views on increasing productivity.

He did not address criticisms about ministerial salary and legal prosecution of Opposition members, but I’m not sure if it matters to most viewers. For the politically-disinclined, these things might just pass over their heads.

But Vincent will be the one to watch. He sounded eloquent and quick-witted. He was enthusiastic, and even promoted SDP’s Shadow Budget while criticising the mainstream media, all at the same time.

He even found time to raise the issue of exorbitant ministerial salaries at least twice, but the PAP reps have totally ignored that.

Sure, the SDP cried foul over how the debate was unfair because candidates who are not contesting are not allowed to speak. This meant that Dr Chee Soon Juan, who declared bankrupt, cannot appear at the forum.

But surely they realise that putting a fresh face on television will take the party one step closer towards rehabilitating their image in the eyes of the populace, especially how Soon Juan has been demonised by the media?

As long as Vincent and Danny the Democratic Bear continue their outreach during the elections and after, I think SDP’s chances at the voting booth in this Election and the next will improve.

For a summary of the key debates, click here.

This post was written by:

- who has written 81 posts on New Nation.

Terence is an online media nut that is obsessed with writing and publishing on the Internet. Recently, he took up photography to expand his repertoire, and hopes to learn videography soon. He has worked in both online and print publications such as The Straits Times, Today, Mind Your Body, The Online Citizen, and Funkygrad. He is currently the assistant editor with SGEntrepreneurs, a website that covers entrepreneurship in Singapore and Asia. Terence can be found on LinkedIn and Twitter.

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  • sgcynic

    “Sure, the SDP cried foul over how the debate was unfair because candidates who are not contesting are not allowed to speak. This meant that Dr Chee Soon Juan, who declared bankrupt, cannot appear at the forum.”

    Point of note: Not only did CNA require candidates, they required the candidate be from the party CEC. Last that I recall, Josephine is not from the PAP CEC.

    “But surely they realise that putting a fresh face on television will take the party one step closer towards rehabilitating their image in the eyes of the populace, especially how Soon Juan has been demonised by the media?”

    Yes. On the other hand, what a surprise (shock) it would have been to see Chee Soon Juan live and to realise that he is not the rabid psychopath that LKY, the PAP and the media make him out to be…

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  • BryanT

    Great piece!

  • Mr K

    I am suggesting that Mr Sitoh may be exchanging wards with that Josephine Teo herself for Bishan-Toa Payoh GRC while there may be possibilty that she will be running against Lina Chiam of SPP in Potong Pasir,right after Grace Fu vs Jaslyn Go in Yuhua…..So there could be another woman-to-woman fight…..
    So what’s the outcome???Should she(Josephine)wins against Lina thus helping in return to PAP for the ward??Or should Mr Sitoh stays in and garner only 55% against her(Lina)???And could Mr Chiam who wishes to lead Bishan-Toa Payoh GRC team against DPM Wong,but may lose out by just 40% plus???

  • Kenneth

    It is to hear good and honest people trying to make a difference for the general public at large. Minister Tharman demonstrated the graciousness of ‘home ground’ advantage. The ‘challenges’ from Gerald and Vincent were commendable. I hope to see the MP stepping down will help to groom the other political party incumbents as the alternative voices for the people. Keep up the efforts

  • http://www.tauhuayboy.wordpress.com Shawn Lim

    I think it’s the safe bet to say that if the opposition only sent Dr Vincent to represent them, he will outtalk anyone that the PAP sends.

  • Fitri

    Instead of Mohamed Nazem Suki, it would be great if MediaCorp had invited Jafri Basron of Reform Party. In the recent, RP Rally cum Picnic Day held at the Speaker Corner, Jafri spoke quite well and some of the points conveyed were interesting especially on the topic of minimum wage scheme. I see that Jafri is among the most prolific Malay politician.

  • soojenn

    Jufri Mohamad from SDP would have also been a prolific speaker.. Nazem was lost.. and kept refering that the oppositions have agreed to this.. that…

    Tharman was full of crap..good speaker yes, but one that is eloquent in aswering questions without providing the answer.. listen to the crap he espoused.

  • keesiao

    Both Dr Chee and Dr Vincent really “A” Team quality.

    I have heard Dr Chee talked in the rally in May 2006; now I heard another outstanding performance by Dr Vincent, SDP looks a great challenger this time round!

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