Tag Archive | "work"

Survey: S’poreans willing to work until they die

Survey: S’poreans willing to work until they die

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Death is a form of release, they said.

singaporeans-at-work

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who do things they do not even want to do, work overtime and many are willing to work even longer hours until they pass away, according to a survey by a recruitment firm.

Half of Singaporeans, or 50 percent, were working more than 44 hours per week, the survey showed.

Around 52 percent of men said they work more than the stipulated 44 hours, compared to 41 percent of women.

The remainder worked until they passed away, with many survey respondents on the brink of death.

Despite wanting better work-life balance, half of the male respondents noted that they would be willing to work longer hours for equal or more pay, compared to 42 percent of women.

The remainder said they worked until they died because death is a better option.

When asked what motivated them to stay alive, the top three reasons for them were more pay, career progression and a form of escape.

When asked what motivated the respondents to work more, almost all said dying at work is a form of release.

This finding could be representative of the current uncertain economic environment leading to employees wanting to work even harder than before.

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans willing to work until they die: Survey

S’poreans willing to work until they die: Survey

Tags: ,


Death is a form of release, they said.

singaporeans-at-work

Most Singaporeans from all walks of life, who do things they do not even want to do, work overtime and many are willing to work even longer hours until they pass away, according to a survey by a recruitment firm.

Half of Singaporeans, or 50 percent, were working more than 44 hours per week, exceeding the limit recommended by the Ministry of Manpower, the survey released Tuesday, May 31, 2016 showed.

Around 52 percent of men said they work more than the stipulated 44 hours, compared to 41 percent of women.

The remainder worked until they passed away, with many survey respondents on the brink of death.

Despite wanting better work-life balance, half of the male respondents noted that they would be willing to work longer hours for equal or more pay, compared to 42 percent of women.

The remainder said they worked until they died because death is a better option.

When asked what motivated them to stay alive, the top three reasons for them were more pay, career progression and a form of escape.

When asked what motivated the respondents to work more, almost all said dying at work is a form of release.

This finding could be representative of the current uncertain economic environment leading to employees wanting to work even harder than before.

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans react to survey finding long working hours an obstacle to family time

S’poreans react to survey finding long working hours an obstacle to family time

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Three thoughts you must have had.

long-working-hours

About 50 percent of 700 Singaporeans surveyed feel that long working hours prevent them from spending more time with their families, according to a survey by national family council Families For Life (FFL).

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “I wouldn’t have guessed otherwise.”
Wu Leow, 43-year-old spoon tester

 

sian-half-uncle “A new survey should find that spending time doing stupid surveys an obstacle to family time.”
Qu Nee Mah, 66-year-old tree doctor

 

happy-bird-girl “Having an affair will lead to more family time, because now you’d have two families.”
Gao Wai Yu, 19-year-old matchmaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Towards A First World Problem: Cars and work

Towards A First World Problem: Cars and work

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First World Pains reflect Singapore’s advancement as a society.

If you love this post, you is potato.

Singaporeans lack fighting spirit of competitiveness, ambition to secure top jobs

Singaporeans lack fighting spirit of competitiveness, ambition to secure top jobs

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So claims Endy Ong, The Straits Times Forum letter writer.

If you can’t find locals in top management positions, don’t fret.

Your incompetence is nationalised, so claims a recent letter writer to The Straits Times Forum.

Therefore, there are no local CEOs in companies because there are no Singaporeans who can do the job.

Also, the government is not accountable to Singaporeans for allowing mainland Chinese workers to occupy low income jobs.

This question as to why Chinese workers are employed should be posed to business owners who hire foreign workers to keep prices competitive.

If not, Singaporeans would need to put up with higher prices because jobs need to be artificially kept for locals who can only be hired at a higher cost.

Lastly, the hard truth is that locals are less easy to handle on a personal level compared to foreign workers who do the same job.

Read the original article here.