Tag Archive | "the straits times"

S’poreans wait for 24-page full-colour Straits Times exposé on AMK Town Council

S’poreans wait for 24-page full-colour Straits Times exposé on AMK Town Council

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This is going to be explosive.

straits-times-newspapers-stack

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to read about other people’s wrongdoing, are waiting with bated breath for The Straits Times to come up with a multi-page, full-colour spread soon.

This after the general manager and secretary of Ang Mo Kio Town Council, Victor Wong, has been removed from his duties and is under investigation by the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau.

Singaporeans are expecting ST to be working on their investigative exposé, as there has been no other reports so far other than one breaking news.

One Singaporean, Kua Sin Boon, said: “The Straits Times reporters must be all hard at work putting their 24-page magnum opus together as we speak now during this end-of-year lull.”

“No rest for the wicked and no rest for hardworking reporters too.”

Other locals said they are excited to see the informative graphics ST puts together showing the probable routes funds have been transferred and are also looking forward to videos showing how relationships between vendors and town council intersect in a complicated web of shady dealings.

Another local, Xi Hei Qian, said: “It will be great if The Straits Times can also investigate the anchor minister in Ang Mo Kio.”

“And then use the power of the press to compel the truth to come out as the local media holds those in authority to account for any transgressions.”

“This is going to be like Spotlight all over again.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans react to The Straits Times winning 12 awards at SPH awards ceremony

S’poreans react to The Straits Times winning 12 awards at SPH awards ceremony

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

st-sph-awards

The Straits Times won 12 awards at the Singapore Press Holdings’ annual English/Malay/Tamil Media group awards ceremony on Thursday, March 3, including in the best journalist and story categories.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “Only 12? Why not 500?”
Pian Jiak, 42-year-old entrepreneur

 

sian-half-uncle “Must have been hard keeping a straight face when giving out the awards.”
Yin Guan Jun, 64-year-old professional hustler

 

happy-bird-girl “This is the same as liking your own Facebook status.”
Hao Seow, 19-year-old magician assistant

 

Give Singapore Press Holdings 12 Majulahs.

Posted by We Are Kanina on Thursday, March 3, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











Reporters who ask questions have no place in 70% mandate S’pore society

Reporters who ask questions have no place in 70% mandate S’pore society

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Majority of Singaporeans do not remember voting for this.

rachel-chang-hep-c-virus-questions

Singaporeans from 70 percent walks of life are up in arms and chastising The Straits Times reporter Rachel Chang.

This after Chang wrote an article asking questions and suggesting that public officers and medical professionals, in both the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and the Ministry of Health (MOH), may have delayed the disclosure of information of a Hepatitis C outbreak to the minister and the public for political reasons.

One Singaporean, Shou Bu Leow, said: “I don’t know if she got the memo, but there is no place in Singapore for a reporter whose sole interest is asking difficult questions and getting at the truth.”

“Who does she think she is? 70 percent of Singaporeans did not vote for this type of wayward behaviour.”

“I don’t remember voting for this during General Election 2015.”

Other Singaporeans said the new 70 percent mandate climate has made it loud and clear that reporters with an agenda to ask questions will be promptly dismissed.

One local, Qu Si Bah, said: “If Rachel Chang wants to ask so many questions and put the government in a tough position, she should just join the opposition and get voted into parliament.”

“That is the only venue to ask tough questions. Actually even then…”

 

 

 

 

 











Reporters who ask many questions have no place in 70% mandate S’pore society

Reporters who ask many questions have no place in 70% mandate S’pore society

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Majority of Singaporeans do not remember voting for this.

rachel-chang-hep-c-virus-questions

Singaporeans from 70 percent walks of life are up in arms and chastising The Straits Times reporter Rachel Chang.

This after Chang wrote an article asking questions and suggesting that public officers and medical professionals, in both the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and the Ministry of Health (MOH), may have delayed the disclosure of information of a Hepatitis C outbreak to the minister and the public for political reasons.

One Singaporean, Shou Bu Leow, said: “I don’t know if she got the memo, but there is no place in Singapore for a reporter whose sole interest is asking difficult questions and getting at the truth.”

“Who does she think she is? 70 percent of Singaporeans did not vote for this type of wayward behaviour.”

“I don’t remember voting for this during General Election 2015.”

Other Singaporeans said the new 70 percent mandate climate has made it loud and clear that reporters with an agenda to ask questions will be promptly dismissed.

One local, Qu Si Bah, said: “If Rachel Chang wants to ask so many questions and put the government in a tough position, she should just join the opposition and get voted into parliament.”

“That is the only venue to ask tough questions. Actually even then…”

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to Straits Times editor saying sorry to Ministry of Health

S’poreans react to Straits Times editor saying sorry to Ministry of Health

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

rachel-chang-hep-c-virus-sorry

The Straits Times editor said sorry to the Ministry of Health on Oct. 20, 2015, and explained that they did not mean to impugn the integrity of public servants:

The Editor replies: It was not the intention of our column to impugn the integrity of public servants. We also did not mean to imply that the Minister for Health was “unofficially” informed beforehand about this matter. We are sorry that our column gave these wrong impressions.

This after ST’s Assistant Political Editor Rachel Chang wrote an article asking questions and suggesting that public officers and medical professionals, in both the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and the Ministry of Health (MOH), may have delayed the disclosure of information of a Hepatitis C outbreak to the minister and the public for political reasons.

 

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “ST helped PAP win GE2015 but it doesn’t give them the right or enough brownie points to boss the ministry and minister around.”
Pai Mah Pi, 44-year-old horse stable cleaner

 

sian-half-uncle “There goes her promotion.”
Sheng Zhi, 64-year-old air vent manufacturer

 

happy-bird-girl “She should have just praised Lee Hsien Loong, which would have worked.”
Lee Zhong Li, 17-year-old semi-professional nail art painter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to The Straits Times editor saying sorry to Ministry of Health

S’poreans react to The Straits Times editor saying sorry to Ministry of Health

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

rachel-chang-hep-c-virus-sorry

The Straits Times editor said sorry to the Ministry of Health on Oct. 20, 2015, and explained that they did not mean to impugn the integrity of public servants:

The Editor replies: It was not the intention of our column to impugn the integrity of public servants. We also did not mean to imply that the Minister for Health was “unofficially” informed beforehand about this matter. We are sorry that our column gave these wrong impressions.

This after ST’s Assistant Political Editor Rachel Chang wrote an article asking questions and suggesting that public officers and medical professionals, in both the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and the Ministry of Health (MOH), may have delayed the disclosure of information of a Hepatitis C outbreak to the minister and the public for political reasons.

 

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “ST helped PAP win GE2015 but it doesn’t give them the right or enough brownie points to boss the ministry and minister around.”
Pai Mah Pi, 44-year-old horse stable cleaner

 

sian-half-uncle “There goes her promotion.”
Sheng Zhi, 64-year-old air vent manufacturer

 

happy-bird-girl “She should have just praised Lee Hsien Loong, which would have worked.”
Lee Zhong Li, 17-year-old semi-professional nail art painter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans agree with PM Lee Hsien Loong that The Straits Times is fair, credible

S’poreans agree with PM Lee Hsien Loong that The Straits Times is fair, credible

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ST’s 170th anniversary made possible by not unfairly biting the hand that feeds them.

lee-hsien-loong-selfie

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who still read The Straits Times as there are not other alternative English broadsheets around so they lan lan, agree with Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s speech given at the ArtScience Museum.

This after PM Lee said at the celebration of the newspaper’s 170th anniversary on July 15, 2015, that ST must maintain its hallmark of credible, balanced and objective reporting.

One Singaporean, Tak Sin Boon, said there is no doubt that ST is fair and objective: “The Straits Times is always very balanced. They will only sing praises of the government and PAP and smear the opposition.”

“This is fair because ST should know better than to unfairly bite the hand that feeds them.”

Other Singaporeans said they are confident ST will continue to be objective in their reporting by providing Singaporeans with the full picture.

Another local, Kwa Poh Zhua, said: “ST will continue to probe stories that make Singapore and the government look good and establish all the facts in those instances are correct.”

“If they break away from this tradition and start doing investigative journalism and make the PAP and government look bad via exposés, then it will be very incredible as they have not done it before.”

“Then this is not very good as Lee Hsien Loong said ST is a ‘credible’ newspaper, not ‘incredible’ one.”

At press time, other Singaporeans said longevity is just a sign you have not been wiped out yet.

 

 

 

 

 





Publicity poster for SEA Games 2015 causes offense as it features the words ‘Willie’, ‘Loo’ & ‘SIN’

Publicity poster for SEA Games 2015 causes offense as it features the words ‘Willie’, ‘Loo’ & ‘SIN’

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Call police.

willie-loo-sin

Singaporeans from all walks of life who are easily offended because their virgin eyes and ears need to be protected from contamination, are calling on the authorities to look into a publicity poster for the upcoming SEA Games 2015.

This after the poster showed the words “Wille”, “Loo” and “SIN” on it, which are bad words if people really think about it.

Chu Nan, a Singaporean man who took offence at the poster, said: “This is not right. Previously, at least one Singaporean had already appealed to the authorities to get rid of ‘SIN’ as the representative code for Singapore as it is associated with vice and sex. The appeal was even published in the national newspaper, The Straits Times.”

“Now, what we’re seeing here are so many more words that connote other bad things that come into my mind all at one time. I cannot take it. I must call police now.”

However, not all Singaporeans are quick to take offence and do not see any merit in calling the police to report this matter.

Another local, Zhen Wu Leow, said: “I think ‘Loo’ and ‘SIN’ are quite okay words still, but I’m not so sure about ‘Willie’.”

“I guess I have no choice but to write to my MP about it.”

“And later on, CC it to Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. And the entire Cabinet to register my displeasure.”

“After which, I’d forward it to The Straits Times as a forum letter because they have no qualms publishing anything.”

 

Quick, let’s take offence now:

S’pore shouldn’t use SIN to represent us in sports because it’s a dirty word

Take the porn out of Singaporean

 





The Straits Times wins big, bags 11 out of 19 awards at Singapore Press Holdings’ annual awards

The Straits Times wins big, bags 11 out of 19 awards at Singapore Press Holdings’ annual awards

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It is tough competing against themselves every year.

sph-building-02

The Straits Times won big this year again at the Singapore Press Holdings’ annual awards.

This after the English broadsheet bagged 11 out of 19 awards.

One of ST’s most popular reporter, Xia Ang Moh, said he is heartened that his organisation has come out tops again but also recognises the difficulties of being number one: “You know what’s harder than being in a two-horse race? Being in a one-horse race.”

“Competing against yourself, and winning credibly year after year, is a difficult process.”

When asked if there are plans to be the biggest winner of awards for an English broadsheet again next year, Xia said: “We’ll try.”

“Nothing’s guaranteed yet. If we have to do it again, we will,” he said, looking a little sheepish.

ST’s big win comes in the midst of news that MediaCorp is retrenching staff, proving yet again that MediaCorp should be like Singapore Press Holdings.

Or both companies can merge into one giant behemoth entity so that it can live up to the monopoly status.

 

MediaCorp should be more like Singapore Press Holdings:

MediaCorp could close down by October 2015 if 3 artistes continue to quit per month

Silent Majority: Too much freedom in S’pore equals freedom to be raped

Silent Majority: Too much freedom in S’pore equals freedom to be raped

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There is a limit to freedom, says The Straits Times letter writer.

lky-simisai

I AM one of the “silent majority”.

I have never written or blogged or Facebooked about national issues. But there’s always a time for it.

I mourn the loss of our national giant, Mr Lee Kuan Yew. My heart is saddened as if I have lost someone close to me. At the same time, my heart is bursting with pride at the unprecedented show of gratitude and patriotism.

If there was one good thing that came out of Mr Lee’s death, this must be it. Grieving together has enlarged our horizons and our souls.

Once, as I was leaving my exercise class, I remarked that it was extremely humid outside. Quick as lightning, my exercise mate from Hong Kong told me: “Don’t complain, Singapore is half a paradise.” She is right. And this, in no small part, is due to the work of Mr Lee, who really could not have done more in his life for this nation.

To the “noisy minority” in relentless search of freedom of speech, political freedom and all, the acid test is this: Have you given 50 per cent of your life for this country? How about 25 per cent, 10 per cent or even 5 per cent? If not, why the noise?

There are always places where such freedom can be found. But together with it, there will be freedom to be discriminated against, freedom to be raped, freedom to be mugged, freedom to be shot – complete freedom.

As for me, I am staying put, humidity and all. I am blessed and proud to be a Singaporean.

Loh Lay San (Madam)

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times Forum on April 1, 2015.

 

Another one living in paradise:

Take those who disrespect Lee Kuan Yew to task

Kishore Mahbubani is the most intelligent man in the Milky Way

Kishore Mahbubani is the most intelligent man in the Milky Way

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One reader shares how this is so.

kishore-ST

Dear New Nation,

I refer to the above article by Kishore Mahbubani, published in The Straits Times on April 13, 2013.

1. Kudos to Singapore Police Force

In the article, which I have read about 15 times to appreciate its essence, Kishore said that Singapore is one of the safest cities in the world because credit goes to the Singapore Police Force for keeping the peace.

I have no choice but to agree that this is absolutely true.

Because without the SPF, Singaporeans will instinctively rape and pillage everything.

But with SPF’s presence, Singaporeans will rein in all their baser desires.

There will, therefore, be no major law breaking. Except minor ones that will be tolerated from time to time.

Such as The Straits Times breaching the Parliamentary Elections Act in February this year by publishing an illegal poll during the Punggol East by-election.

This kind of law-breaking is obviously a minor issue, because there has been no word fron the SPF about the case for a few months now.

2. Kudos to non-rioting Singaporeans and abstract logic

Next, Kishore also said that even though thousands of people were inconvenienced by the MRT breakdowns in recent years, each incident passed peacefully, reflecting the high level of trust that Singaporeans have in their public institutions.

And Singaporeans do not riot as a result of transportation failures because living standards and trust in public institutions are high.

This is, once again, absolutely correct and irrefutable.

It is the same as saying that no man wants to sleep with your wife, because your wife is morally upright and possesses impeccable values, and hence, will not stray.

But in reality, it is actually because she is just plain ugly and looks like a truck.

It is for these two arguments that I fully respect and look up to Kishore Mahbubani and give him full credit for his incisive thinking and unimpeachable logic.

Without him expending effort doing all these thinking on my behalf, I wonder who else can fill his place in this Milky Way?

Yours truly,
Citas Cras Ton

ST contemplates going after PAP to boost readership

ST contemplates going after PAP to boost readership

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Declining readership forcing nation-building press to change tack.

In the face of a declining readership and a better educated electorate, the nation-building press, The Straits Times, is looking into ways to change its reporting style to win back an audience.

All along, the broadsheet has only written favourably about the PAP.

However, it is now contemplating going after the ruling party to appeal to the anti-authoritarian crowd.

And maintain its business bottomline.

Tan Tua Lui, a ST reader who is already sick of reading ST, said: “If ST truly wants to remain competitive and gain readers, it should just write investigative news reports about the PAP.”

“Look at blogivist Alex Au of Yawning Bread. His intelligent critiques and incisive style digs up dirt on the PAP and he has a strong following of several hundred thousand readers.”

Alex Au’s latest critiques about the PAP Town Council fiasco involving some shady software business dealings, has attracted a lot of readers and put many ST reporters to shame as he is doing a much better job than paid writers.

This share of audience that ST has not captured also means it is ultimately bad for business, because the behemoth Singapore Press Holdings often prides itself as being profitable, instead of providing good journalistic writing in the first place.

And taking pot shots at the PAP is proven to be good for business. Look at The Online Citizen.

Without a doubt, this change in tack to go after the ruling party in this new year has been condoned by everyone interviewed by New Nation.

Kwa Poh Zhuar, an anti-ST protestor, said: “Everyday write favourable stories about PAP read until sian. You mean you everyday eat char kway teow you not sian?”

The Straits Times dabbling in irony?

The Straits Times dabbling in irony?

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New strategy to boost falling newspaper readership?

In an interesting twist of events, it appears that Singapore’s favourite leading broadsheet, The Straits Times, is pulling out all the stops to reverse the trend of falling newspaper readership.

These days, anyone can be forgiven for thinking that the broadsheet is getting readers to spot inconsistencies and incongruities in its reporting and headline-writing to achieve virality online.

This is one of the latest examples on May 22, 2012:

Inconsistency. We have some.

It is not known how effective this campaign will be or it has been given full approval by the news producers.

However, sources not close to the management believe this novel approach might not work too smoothly as the newspaper already has a history of being incongruous.

One such anonymous source said: “In the last five odd decades, they have already been the most inconsistent by constantly failing to report news and perspectives that truly reflect the concerns of average Singaporeans.”

This latest development has done nothing to rattle Singapore Press Holdings share prices, which closed at $3.80 a piece.

SPH claims it does not benefit directly from reposts on STOMP?

SPH claims it does not benefit directly from reposts on STOMP?

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What incessant rubbish.

Here’s the story so far: Singapore Press Holdings is planning on suing the bejesus out of Yahoo! for reproducing at least 23 of its articles without permission.

SPH also claims the infringing acts by Yahoo! were “committed for financial gain”, as reported in this Dec. 29, 2011 article by Marcus Lim, The Straits Times’ Assistant News Editor:

 

 

But Yahoo! is not taking things lying down.

In its counter suit, Yahoo! is claiming that SPH’s STOMP reproduced two of its articles and a picture without permission between Oct. 26 and 28 this year.

However, acting as if it’s all okay, SPH is going into denial mode, as they “stressed that it did not receive any financial benefit directly attributable to the alleged infringement”.

 

 

Basically, SPH is claiming that they are innocent simply because:
1. STOMP is dependent on third-party, user-generated content, so SPH cannot be blamed if third-party users want to steal stuff from elsewhere.
2. Ignorance of the origins of material published in STOMP makes a good defence.
3. It’s not really stealing if they’re supposedly not making money off it.

 

 

For everyone’s information and benefit, STOMP makes money from advertisements. This is their advertising rate card:

 

 

So, if the argument is that content found on STOMP does not belong to SPH, pray tell, then why is SPH still making all the money from advertisements found on STOMP?

Even if SPH does not “benefit directly” from the reproduction of individual copyrighted material uploaded by third-party users, don’t they at least make money off STOMP indirectly but collectively, partly because STOMP as a platform has lax standards of verifying the source of materials posted?

Ipso facto, for SPH to claim that it does not “benefit directly” even though they have a financial interest in seeing STOMP aggregate eyeballs to up page views and derive more ad dollars eventually:

 

In other news, SPH has a knack for stealing stuff online: SPH stole from Red Sports, an online sports news outfit.