Tag Archive | "SMRT"

SMRT affirms commitment to reliable revenue generation after making S$109.3 million profits

SMRT affirms commitment to reliable revenue generation after making S$109.3 million profits

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Three cheers for CEO Desmond Kuek.

smrt-trains

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to take the MRT because cars are for rich people, are slow clapping and nodding their heads in approval.

This after SMRT raked in a net profit of S$109.3 million for Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, where profits increased 20.1 percent.

One Singaporean, Tan Tua Lui, said this bodes well for SMRT as it did not allow the many train disruptions to affect them: “It is good to see that multiple train disruptions throughout the year have helped create profits.”

“Imagine the full amount they can make if trains broke down once a week instead of every other day.”

“At this rate, SMRT can now boast that it has a reliable profit-generating system in place.”

However, other Singaporeans said this bodes especially well for SMRT CEO Desmond Kuek.

Mei You Qian, another local, said this money-making organisation helps cater to regular Singaporeans as Singapore aims for a future where public transport will be the only mode of transport: “As Singapore becomes more car-lite in the future, Desmond Kuek can be the lucky few who can still afford to drive.”

“The roads will be really clear and empty for his use.”

 

 

 

 

 





SMRT lowers target from 100 disruption-free days to 4 disruption-free days

SMRT lowers target from 100 disruption-free days to 4 disruption-free days

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They will meet expectations in this case.

smrt-breakdown-north-south-line

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe in adjusting expectations to meet targets, are nodding their heads in agreement.

This after SMRT announced they will be adjusting their target of achieving 100 disruption-free days to four disruption-free days in light of new expectations.

Hao Pang Yang, a Singaporean commuter, said this will allow them to surpass expectations more easily: “Every four days, they will meet their target and reach a new milestone.”

“This is a good start.”

“After a few years, they can raise it to five disruption-free days to really demonstrate their engineering prowess.”

However, other Singaporeans said they disagreed with this lowering of standards to meet performance expectations.

Another commuter, Zhuan Qian, said: “Instead of reducing it from 100 to four days, SMRT should consider making it zero disruption-free day.”

“This way, they can peg incentives whenever they achieve just one day free of disruptions and give themselves monetary incentives for the good work done.”

“Sometimes in life when you cannot change reality, you need to pick your battles and adjust your expectations accordingly.”

“No point beating yourself up when you cannot solve intractable problems.”

 

 

 

 

 





MRT gantries affirm commitment to be reliable even during power disruptions

MRT gantries affirm commitment to be reliable even during power disruptions

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They will continue to deduct your fares even with no power.

mrt-breakdown-power

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to take the MRT because cars are for rich people, are slow clapping and nodding their heads in approval.

This after MRT gantries continued to function as if nothing is wrong despite portions of both the North-South and East-West lines going down simultaneously in the evening on Monday, April 25, due to a power fault.

Train services between Joo Koon and Bugis stations on the East-West line and between Woodlands and Jurong East stations on the North-South line were affected.

One commuter, Zhen Shen Qi, said she is impressed by the gantries reliability to continue to deduct fares even with no power on: “The manufacturer of these MRT gantries must teach the manufacturers of the trains and tracks on how to be reliable.”

“Even though there is no light in the station and all the power is switched off, the gantries are still functioning like normal.”

“This is the type of reliability that has traditionally been reserved for the ERP gantries.”

“After nuclear holocaust, also no problem.”

At press time, however, other Singaporeans praised SMRT for reaffirming their commitment to be reliable by predictably breaking down every day on both lines so as to not keep commuters guessing about when the next disruption will be.

 

 

 

 

 





S’pore to experiment with 28-hour days to give SMRT extra time each day to maintain tracks

S’pore to experiment with 28-hour days to give SMRT extra time each day to maintain tracks

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This is to address the problem of lack of downtime for maintenance.

28-hour-days-smrt

In a bid to ensure 70 percent of Singaporeans get the Singapore they deserve having approved of the new way forward, Singapore is implementing 28-hour days in place of regular 24-hour days.

This after the government vowed to give SMRT sufficient time to maintain its tracks, by making full use of the strong mandate given by the people.

The Singapore government discovered that adding four additional hours a day to the traditional globally-recognised 24-hour cycle is much easier than expecting SMRT to fix its tracks on time over a few hours overnight before the tracks that were fixed earlier start breaking down again.

One government spokesperson, Gan Shi Jian, said: “If we cannot fix the track, we might as well fix time itself.”

“This way, SMRT will be able to tackle the problem at its root, which is really, a lack of time.”

“And by having 28-hour days, we are also effectively extending the time before the next General Election in 2020 arrives.”

Singaporeans who heard of this plan said they are supportive of it.

One local, Bao Fo Jiao, said: “After considering which task is easier, I guess they decided that extending the day to 28 hours is still more doable than expecting the tracks to be fixed on time.”

“But not doing much to maintain the tracks the past 20 years and trying to do everything now feels a lot like last minute grab Buddha leg.”

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to SMRT fined S$5.4 million for July 7 breakdown

S’poreans react to SMRT fined S$5.4 million for July 7 breakdown

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

5.4-million-fine

Rail operator SMRT Corp has been fined $5.4 million for the MRT breakdown that shut down both the North-South and East-West lines on July 7.

The disruption affected some 413,000 commuters, many of whom reached home at midnight and some did so by walking.

The $5.4 million fine will go to the Public Transport Fund, which pays for transport vouchers to help needy families.

SMRT’s rail revenue for the 12 months ended March 31 stood at $644 million for the North-South, East-West and Circle lines.

The previous record fine was $2 million, slapped on SMRT for the 2011 North-South Line disruptions on Dec 15 and Dec 17 that affected about 221,000 commuters combined.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “Not as if SMRT CEO Desmond Kuek is going to lose sleep about this because it’s not coming out of his million-dollar salary.”
Ta Dee Tieh, 45-year-old furniture mover

 

sian-half-uncle “So the people who cannot afford to drive pays to supplement the cost of transport for the lower income whenever the train breaks down, while the rich will forever be immune to the problems of everyone else.”
Ah Seah Kia, 63-year-old prawn seller

 

happy-bird-girl “If S$5.4 million is going to be used to help needy families pay for transportation, this just means that Singapore has a lot of needy families or transport fare is exorbitant.”
Jin Boh Lui, 18-year-old aquarium cleaner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to SAF deploying soldiers to manage commuters during MRT disruptions

S’poreans react to SAF deploying soldiers to manage commuters during MRT disruptions

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

soldiers-mrt-disruptions

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) has approached the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) to explore deploying soldiers during large-scale disruptions to give directions and manage crowds.

Tapping on the military during massive disruptions makes sense as soldiers can be called up and deployed at short notice and can channel commuters to the right places as quickly as possible.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “This is expected as SMRT is already being run by paper generals from the army.”
Kee Zho Peng, 42-year-old nurse

 

sian-half-uncle “Men who have been trained for war are indeed the best candidates on the ground during MRT disruptions.”
Jin Juay Lang, 62-year-old bookie

 

happy-bird-girl “This proves the military can be deployed in an instant to intervene, such as when the PAP loses majority in parliament.”
Gao Zhen Zhi, 17-year-old political scientist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











S’pore to experiment with 28-hour days to give SMRT extra time overnight to maintain tracks

S’pore to experiment with 28-hour days to give SMRT extra time overnight to maintain tracks

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This is to address the problem of lack of downtime for maintenance.

28-hour-days-smrt

In a bid to ensure SMRT has sufficient time to maintain its tracks to prevent future breakdowns and to avoid having transport issues turn into a hot button topic as General Election 2015 nears, Singapore is experimenting with going from 24-hour days to 28-hour days.

This after the Singapore government discovered that adding four additional hours a day to the traditional globally-recognised 24-hour cycle is much easier than expecting SMRT to fix its tracks on time over a few hours overnight before GE2015.

One government spokesperson, Gan Shi Jian, said: “If we cannot fix the track, we might as well fix time itself.”

“This way, SMRT will be able to tackle the problem at its root, which is really, a lack of time.”

“And by having 28-hour days, we are also effectively extending the time before the next General Election arrives.”

Singaporeans who heard of this plan said they are supportive of it.

One local, Bao Fo Jiao, said: “After considering which task is easier, I guess they decided that extending the day to 28 hours is still more doable than expecting the tracks to be fixed on time.”

“But not doing much to maintain the tracks the past 20 years and trying to do everything now feels a lot like last minute grab Buddha leg.”

 

 

 

 

 





SAF to run SMRT since top management are already military men

SAF to run SMRT since top management are already military men

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The transition would be seamless.

smrt-military

Singaporeans from all walks of life who like to take public transport because cars are for rich people have come out to advice SMRT.

This after SMRT’s managing director of trains and ex-Republic of Singapore Air Force officer Lee Ling Wee admitted the train operator cannot deal with massive train disruptions on its own.

In response, one helpful Singaporean, Kee Zho Peng, said he empathises with SMRT and can only think of one solution that will be win-win for all: “SMRT so poor thing. Only capable of collecting revenue and making profits but not deal with problems.”

“Therefore, it is quite clear that the Singapore Armed Forces must take over SMRT. This is because there are already so many military men within SMRT’s ranks, the transition will be smooth.”

Another Singaporean said this bodes well with the calls from all quarters to nationalise the transport rail network in the first place.

One local, Boh Hua Qia, said: “This will then cause the train system to function with some efficiency as there is plenty of redundancy within the SAF, with all these men who are training for war all the time but always living in peace, which means they are not living up to their fullest potential while still collecting salary.”

“Furthermore, SMRT can still keep its current acronym: Singapore Military Regime Transit.”

“So convenient.”

 

 

 

 

 











SAF to take over running of SMRT since top management are already military men

SAF to take over running of SMRT since top management are already military men

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The transition would be seamless.

smrt-military

Singaporeans from all walks of life who like to take public transport because cars are for rich people have come out to advice SMRT.

This after SMRT’s managing director of trains and ex-Republic of Singapore Air Force officer Lee Ling Wee admitted the train operator cannot deal with massive train disruptions on its own.

In response, one helpful Singaporean, Kee Zho Peng, said he empathises with SMRT and can only think of one solution that will be win-win for all: “SMRT so poor thing. Only capable of collecting revenue and making profits but not deal with problems.”

“Therefore, it is quite clear that the Singapore Armed Forces must take over SMRT. This is because there are already so many military men within SMRT’s ranks, the transition will be smooth.”

Another Singaporean said this bodes well with the calls from all quarters to nationalise the transport rail network in the first place.

One local, Boh Hua Qia, said: “This will then cause the train system to function with some efficiency as there is plenty of redundancy within the SAF, with all these men who are training for war all the time but always living in peace, which means they are not living up to their fullest potential while still collecting salary.”

“Furthermore, SMRT can still keep its current acronym: Singapore Military Regime Transit.”

“So convenient.”

 

 

 

 

 











North-South, East-West line breakdown unites S’poreans

North-South, East-West line breakdown unites S’poreans

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Singaporeans bond over calls to commit hara-kiri, meditate on their role in Singapore’s natural aristocracy.

mrt-breakdown2015

Singaporeans from all walks of life who are experiencing the complete collapse of the SMRT North-South and East-West lines system say they feel united as one people, one nation and one Singapore.

This after the breakdown brought a large number of Singaporeans together to commiserate with one another.

One Singaporean, Zuo Huang Di, said: “The last time I saw this many thousands of Singaporeans hanging out together was at Workers’ Party rally in Hougang, where Singaporeans turned up in droves and were united as one.”

“This 7/7/2015 complete collapse of the SMRT system really brings us back to those good times, and now at a time like this, it allows for each and every Singaporean to meditate on our role in this natural aristocracy.”

Other Singaporeans said given this current climate of immobility, it is a good time to put their heads together to go through the list of those who should take responsibility and commit hara-kiri.

Another Singaporean, Qu Zi Sah, said: “As the minion class, we deserve this cattle class treatment.”

“But it is also a good time to contemplate who in the upper management will need to commit hara-kiri because according to National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan, those who cause lapses to occur must commit suicide via hara-kiri, as a matter of atonement and accepting responsibility for failure.”

At press time, other Singaporeans say they are already looking forward to more of such gatherings to allow locals to bond together in large groups as reliability of SMRT train services is increasing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans take responsibility for making SMRT CEO’s North-South, East-West lines spoil at the same time

S’poreans take responsibility for making SMRT CEO’s North-South, East-West lines spoil at the same time

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They want to start fundraising campaign to ensure he gets paid more than S$2.2 million next year to prevent same incident.

desmond-kuek

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to take the MRT train because cars are for rich people, are feeling apologetic and sincerely sorry.

This after they caused the North-South and East-West MRT Line to break down at the same time on 7/7/15 during peak hour as they all went home together in the evening at 7pm.

One Singaporean, Jin Soh Lee, said he would like to personally apologise to SMRT CEO Desmond Kuek for causing him inconvenience and dealing with this issue after his office hours: “I’m sorry Desmond Kuek. I caused your MRT system to break down again, especially after your face appear in the newspaper big big saying how you personally ensure SMRT is run properly.”

“So, please forgive me and my fellow commuters for making you work harder during your evening family time to oversee that there are no more train faults even when all of these problems are not your doing.”

Another Singaporean, Gei Ni Qian, went beyond apologising and insisted on doing more on his part to ensure the quality of MRT trains improve: “I would like to donate money to the SMRT CEO to make sure he gets paid more than S$2.2 million as compensation.”

“If we paid more for his salary every year, none of these would have happened.”

“Eh wait…”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





SMRT to invest in 4th telco in S’pore to ensure reliability of train breakdowns

SMRT to invest in 4th telco in S’pore to ensure reliability of train breakdowns

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OMG branding will achieve synergy with current train faults.

singtel-omgtel

Transport operator SMRT has announced it may invest up to $34.5 million in Singapore’s fourth telcos to derive synergies from dabbling in both transport and media.

Singaporeans from all walks of life who like to take public transport because cars are for rich people said they are happy that SMRT will be able to lend their transport oeprating expertise, or lack of, to the newest telco.

One Singaporean, Mei You Ling, said: “I’m sure SMRT, with their stellar transport operating record, can ensure a telco do their job marginally well by enraging the population-at-large with spotty service on a regular basis, but not provoke the populace enough to start a revolt.”

“It is also heartening to see SMRT contributing more to ensuring the train breakdown reliability is improving by investing in non-transport competencies.”

Other Singaporeans said the OMG branding will work well for SMRT and the fourth telco as it is set to ride on the frequent train breakdowns.

Stranded commuters will be expected to exclaim “OMG not again” every time there is another train fault.

 

 

 

 

 











SMRT to invest in 4th telco in S’pore to maintain reliability of train breakdowns

SMRT to invest in 4th telco in S’pore to maintain reliability of train breakdowns

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OMG branding will achieve synergy with current train faults.

mrt-track-walk

Transport operator SMRT has announced it may invest up to $34.5 million in one of Singapore’s fourth telcos to derive synergies from the transport operator’s “extensive media presence and commuter reach”.

This after local tech company Consistel has promised cheaper phone bills with its OMG! brand of mobile services if its subsidiary OMGtel wins the fourth telco license from the Infocomm Development Authority.

Singaporeans from all walks of life who like to take public transport because cars are for rich people said they are happy that SMRT will be able to lend their transport oeprating expertise or lack of to the newest telco.

One Singaporean, Mei You Ling, said: “I’m sure SMRT with their stellar transport operating record can ensure a telco do their job marginally well by enraging the population-at-large with spotty service on a regular basis but not provoke the populace enough to start a revolt.”

“It is also heartening to see SMRT contributing more to ensuring the train breakdown reliability is improving by investing in non-transport competencies.”

Other Singaporeans said the OMG branding will work well for SMRT and the fourth telco as it is set to ride on the frequent train breakdowns. Stranded commuters will be expected to exclaim “OMG not again” every time there is another train fault.

 

SMRT doing a good job developing their non-transport competencies because a transport operator must be a telco too:

MRT reliability has improved as breakdowns happening daily instead of unpredictably

 

 

 

 

 











SMRT East West Line shut down for 30 minutes on Friday evening as mark of respect for LKY

SMRT East West Line shut down for 30 minutes on Friday evening as mark of respect for LKY

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Lines between Bugis and Aljunied were quiet for a while.

bugis-mrt-sign

To join in with the mass display of solidarity by Singaporeans from all walks of life, SMRT East West Line trains observed 30 minutes of silence on Friday evening peak hour in honour of Lee Kuan Yew.

This after SMRT announced at around 6pm on Friday, March 27, 2015, that eastbound trains from Bugis to Aljunied stations stopped working as a mark of respect for the founding prime minister of Singapore.

Eyewitnesses who were present when the trains observed many moments of silence suddenly, said it affected them emotionally as the silence intensified the already sombre mood that evening, with tens of thousands of Singaporeans descending upon the Parliament House to pay their last respects.

One commuter, Hen Shang Xing, said he was sad that day and the train’s observation of silence for 30 minutes made him even sadder: “I took it as a sign of respect to observe a moment of silence. But observing several moments of silence while we were on the platform made us all sadder.”

“And it is definitely much sadder considering that SMRT trains along East West Line observed 20 minutes of silence on March 23, like just two days earlier.”

Another commuter Zho Hao Lam, said: “Every time the MRT train observe many moments of silence, we will automatically become sad.”

 

Shut down everything in honour of Lee Kuan Yew:

SMRT train along East West Line observed 20 minutes of silence on March 23, 2015

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