Tag Archive | "SAF"

Let SAF soldiers bring commuters home during MRT disruptions

Let SAF soldiers bring commuters home during MRT disruptions

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Military camps have spare vehicle capacity.

saf-transport

“Ah boy ah, got go Punggol one?”

Instead of getting soldiers to manage the crowd during train disruptions (“Soldiers may help manage crowds in rail disruptions”; Aug 21), we should let them drive the commuters to their destinations instead.

Our military camps have a fair amount of spare vehicle capacity.

Crowd control at MRT stations won’t be very necessary if we can provide other means of transport that will allow the crowd to quickly disperse from the stations.

Rather than cure the symptom of a breakdown – the crowd – we should fix the underlying cause – the failure of an important means of transport.

Sum Siew Kee

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times on Aug. 25, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Let SAF soldiers drive commuters home during MRT disruptions

Let SAF soldiers drive commuters home during MRT disruptions

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Military camps have spare vehicle capacity.

saf-transport

“Ah boy ah, got go Punggol one?”

Instead of getting soldiers to manage the crowd during train disruptions (“Soldiers may help manage crowds in rail disruptions”; Aug 21), we should let them drive the commuters to their destinations instead.

Our military camps have a fair amount of spare vehicle capacity.

Crowd control at MRT stations won’t be very necessary if we can provide other means of transport that will allow the crowd to quickly disperse from the stations.

Rather than cure the symptom of a breakdown – the crowd – we should fix the underlying cause – the failure of an important means of transport.

Sum Siew Kee

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times on Aug. 25, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to news that SMU’s oldest graduate is 45-year-old SAF regular

S’poreans react to news that SMU’s oldest graduate is 45-year-old SAF regular

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

smu-oldest-graduate

A 45-year-old Singaporean man graduated from the School of Information Systems at Singapore Management University making him the oldest person in the university’s 15-year history to be awarded a Bachelor’s degree.

The senior military expert had received full funding from the Singapore Armed Forces to obtain his degree in SMU, where the average age of his classmates were about 20 years younger.

He has worked in the SAF for 24 years.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “Didn’t the government say degrees are useless in Singapore?”
Ai Tee Ee, 43-year-old bean curd seller

 

sian-half-uncle “Basically this guy is into the two things I hate most: SAF and studying.”
Kee Zho Peng, 71-year-old ex-convict

 

happy-bird-girl “This just shows you don’t need a tertiary education qualification in the first place to survive in the SAF.”
Qu Zhuo Gong, 18-year-old dropout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





NSman’s grandmother signs up for SAF Volunteer Corps with Naval Diving Unit

NSman’s grandmother signs up for SAF Volunteer Corps with Naval Diving Unit

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My grandmother can really run faster, swim further and jump higher than you.

ah-ma-ns

An NSman’s 90-year-old grandmother has not only become Singapore’s first person to sign up for the SAF Volunteer Corps, she has also successfully managed to get selected into the Naval Diving Unit, one of the toughest vocations in the whole of the military.

The old lady, who scored 85 points when she completed the new three-station IPPT introduced in July 2014, said she is unfazed by the training requirements because she is as tough as Singaporean men.

Lau Ah Ma, the grandmother, said: “I took the three-station IPPT in July and passed with flying colours. I am glad the military has lowered the fitness standard of passing by so much that it has easily allowed me to score close to full marks.”

“Honestly, I do worry about my pace because I am already so old. But I shall try my best to keep up with the NSFs serving National Service, by slowing down a bit more just to keep up with them.”

“Jokes aside, it’s great to see young men becoming Naval Divers and Commandos. Because really, there are only so many NSFs who can become clerks and drivers.”

To register for the volunteer corps, women, first-generation permanent residents and new citizens aged between 18 and 45, who are not liable for national service, will be able to sign up to serve from March next year.

Except foreigners, they can continue to live off the land with their children and accrue all the benefits without having to worry about this concept called National Service.

 

All the National Service news:

NSman’s grandmother gets 85 points taking the new 3-station IPPT

IPPT made simpler by combining five stations into one

Tens of thousands of men run Army Half Marathon but complain cannot pass IPPT 2.4km run

SAF halts all training, deems war misogynistic, offensive

S’poreans agree ‘graduate glut’ problem as serious as having too many paper generals in military

S’poreans agree ‘graduate glut’ problem as serious as having too many paper generals in military

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They are the same kind of problem, locals say.

singapore-graduate-glut

Singapore producing too many graduates who can’t find enough good jobs will create a “graduate glut” problem, Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin said in Parliament on March 7 during the Committee of Supply debate.

Singaporeans, by and large, agree that this issue is a problem, but also say that they know that it already exists and have deep roots.

This is so as Singaporeans with too high paper qualifications are already getting promoted to many high positions and collect a lot of salary every month, even though those with paper qualifications actually do things that don’t require a lot of skill.

One Singaporean, Kee Zho Peng, said: “I think SAF got a lot of Brigadier-General and Rear-Admiral all like that. Paper general nia.”

“Then later enter politics.”

MINDEF increases army food budget, combat ration to include Katong laksa, tulang

MINDEF increases army food budget, combat ration to include Katong laksa, tulang

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News coincides with announcement that Singapore will get a new army chief on March 21.

saf-army-chief

MINDEF will be allocating more resources to make combat rations tastier for SAF soldiers.

This after SAF combat rations were panned by UK’s The Guardian newspaper for its paltry servings and limited menu selection.

Some new food items to be appear in field packs soon include Katong laksa, tulang, chili crab and oyster omlette — food that are traditionally unhealthy.

MINDEF’s tweaking of the combat ration also follows years of lobbying by AMARE (Association of Men for Action and Reaction).

The men’s organisation has complained all along that the practice of subjecting men to unrealistic demands to conform to ideal masculine, fighting fit body types and be of a high fitness level should stop.

Akshun Bayday, president of the men’s rights group, said: “One way for men to overcome this obsession with fulfilling other people’s demands on their bodies to be trim and fit is to eat more unhealthily.”

“And we are glad that the new incoming army chief is slowly but surely eradicating the masculine ideals of being a real man by first getting rid of the moustache.”

SAF halts all training, deems war misogynistic, offensive

SAF halts all training, deems war misogynistic, offensive

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This after AWARE Singapore said so.

singapore-army

The Singapore Armed Forcecs has halted all training exercises and might be winding the organisation down soon.

This after feminist association AWARE Singapore pointed out that war is misogynistic and the penis is a tool of oppression.

Supreme General of the Army, Jin Seow Onn, said he is heartened to hear that war will cease because some women said so: “It is great that I can get paid without training so hard now.”

“I hope there is no more IPPT also, because IPPT is also misogynistic and oppressive.”

 

 

 

 

Parents worried schools will be militarised soon

Parents worried schools will be militarised soon

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Lack of civilians taking up civilian education jobs a worry.

Another general, another day.

Another general, another day.

Former SAF regular, guardsman and lieutenant-general Neo Kian Hong is going to become the Permanent Secretary for Education Development, it was announced these few days.

Although his new position might sound very womanly and involves wearing a skirt, the 49-year-old might in fact be bringing his manly military experience with him to this new role, such as marching and doing head count.

Parents interviewed said they are worried schools will become more rigid as a result. And square.

Mai Zho Peng, a mother of three, said: “It is already compulsory for school children to wear uniform everyday. What next? Carry SBO and touch the tree ah?”

Others said the regimental regime in Singapore’s education system could get worse.

A Singaporean mother, As Eh Eff, said: “Why all the ex-SAF regulars end up in civilian sector? Civilian sector cannot find civilians to do the job is it?”

SAF emphasises safety, NSFs feel completely safe

SAF emphasises safety, NSFs feel completely safe

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NSFs believe safety will benefit them.

What you think the army might be like 2: Safety begins with me

Safety begins with me

The Singapore Armed Forces has announced that it is making safety a top priority and a core value, after a spate of high profile deaths and injuries in the SAF the past few years.

This new direction is making full time national servicemen (NSFs) feel grateful.

One NSF, Zhen Qian Bian, said: “Focus on safety means you can chao keng more easily. You can purposely get yourself slightly injured and escape training.”

However, this is not the only plus point.

Another NSF, Boh Tao Nao, who was running around with a pair of scissors, blindfolded, said: “Now that the SAF emphasises safety, I feel like I can never die no matter what I do.”

This has also prompted more suggestions by NSFs on how to increase safety awareness.

One NSF, Zhen Wu Liao, said: “If we keep safety in mind, we will refrain from doing dangerous things. For example, we will not chase one another in the shower naked, while trying to slap one another with a wet towel.”

He added: “We will only do such things under the supervision of our training safety officers or platoon commander, and they can videotape it in case anything bad happens, we can still review it.”

Shock? What shock?

Shock? What shock?

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Why the sudden resignation of a high-flying colonel is not newsworthy.

By Myk Litoris
Special Defence Correspondent Report

Colonel Nelson Yau says "I quit!"

There has been quite a few media reports that are portraying the resignation of Singapore Armed Forces regular Colonel Nelson Yau, who was also the chairman of the National Day Parade organising committee, as a mystery and a shock.

I mean, is this necessary?

Yes, no reasoning has been given other than saying that his departure is due to “personal reasons”.

But what should we be expecting from the Singapore Armed Forces?

For them to reveal the whole case in black and white?

Disseminate the news over Twitter the moment Colonel Yau sat down with his colleagues to inform them about his resignation last Monday?

Imagine how this would look: “Col Nel Yau quits SAF. Becos he cannot tahan cookhouse food anymore? More details soon.”

Put it out on Facebook?

Call Tessa Wong of The Straits Times the moment he decided to bail?

But more importantly, why should his sudden resignation be of any interest to the general public?

Yes, it could possibly be true that without the calibre of Colonel Yau to oversee the organisation of this year’s 47th National Day Parade, our nation’s birthday celebration will go to the dogs.

There won’t be the bright lights. Or the sorry-looking NSFs prancing around, working below minimum wage levels. Or the fire works might be replaced with hand-held sparklers.

And even if it did take place, instead of a dazzling display of performers running around and reenacting Singapore’s tempestuous rise away from Malaysia and the proud military showboating technique of rifle-twirling, we have the normal cake-cutting with candle-blowing, followed by a buffet that is normally found at a 12-year-old’s birthday celebration.

But we all know the military is never short of talent.

Look, they’ve even produced Chan Chun Sing!

So to really proclaim shock at anything, there is a need to produce miraculous evidence.

Because, all things considered, it is not as if Colonel Yau is quiting the Singapore Armed Forces to join Al Qaeda.

If that were the case, it will truly be newsworthy.

It will be like Anakin Skywalker to Darth Vader all over again.

Switching sides like this will be something that will deserve a screaming font size 72-worthy headline.

So what else would be considered news?

Well, if Colonel Yau quit the SAF so he can become a woman.

This would attract attention for sure. But no worries, because The New Paper will be on his case and they will provide a lot of anonymous quotes by people who might not even exist to talk about him.

But this will truly be a personal story worth reporting.

Other than these two scenarios, what else can provoke a lot of interest?

Mmm let’s see. He quits the SAF because he has grown gills and he is becoming a full-time fish?

That would be an evolutionary step in the right direction.

Yes, I know. There might in fact be more than meets the eye.

But then again, so what?

Even if Colonel Yau quits so that he will be eligible to join a political party to contest in Hougang SMC, why should this be news?

Everyone knows that if he joins the PAP, they will still lose no matter what.

Singapore’s Armed Forces teach soldiers how to tell stories

Singapore’s Armed Forces teach soldiers how to tell stories

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This is a 60 second summary of the original article published on Oct 24, Monday on page A10.

Editor’s note: Our tags were meant for SEO purposes. Apologies if this article offends any hardcore chao enthu SAF fanboys.

Chief Warrant Officer Joseph Pereira of the Republic of Singapore Air Force, representing the morale of his men, says that he has seen more pride and effort that his men have put in, since he learnt how to tell stories.

Since the start of this year, commanders in SAF training schools and institutes, such as the Officer Cadet School and Infantry Training Institute, have been taught how to tell stories. These stories centre on the SAF’s seven core values, such as “care for soldiers”, “leadership” and “professionalism”.

SAF commanders – from third sergeants to majors – learn how to start stories with an emotional point of view, when and how to marry facts and emotions, and how to extract a lesson from the story.

According to Colonel Sukhmohinder Singh, who provides a cryptic quote that seemed to suggest that soldiers remember commands through emotions: “When you try to talk about technical and tactical things, it’s hard to get people going… humans don’t connect to a lot of facts alone, but they connect to the story related to the facts.”

He also adds that story-telling aside, commanders will continue to give naughty boys a spanking dish out generous servings of pushups and menial tasks to enforce discipline.

“We are still a hierarchical organisation that deals with life and death…that (discipline) will be something we never throw out”.

The Centre for Leadership Development started exploring storytelling in 2007 as part of a new way to groom commanders to communicate effectively with their men.

Air force weapons instructor Tan Chwee Leng, 35, said: “I used to always wish that conversations and stories I had with my seniors during coffee breaks and happy-hour sessions would drag on longer.”

The article did not say if these storytelling skills would improve soldiers’ ability to chao geng more convincingly, nor did it mention if the stories would be confined to non-fiction.

Manhunt on for full-time National Serviceman and maid involved in photo, blogger alleges

Manhunt on for full-time National Serviceman and maid involved in photo, blogger alleges

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By David Boey

This is the footpath off Bedok Rise used by the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) soldier, believed to be a full-time National Serviceman (NSF), and a woman carrying a fullpack, believed to be his domestic helper, who appeared in that iconic image. To the right of this footpath is the public housing estate which is home to an NSF who made headlines in 2007, Dave Teo. Photo and caption: DAVID BOEY

PLAINCLOTHES officers believed to be from the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) combed a housing estate in Bedok on Saturday (2 April’11) for the individuals in the infamous picture of a maid carrying a fullpack – but failed to find their targets.

The officers gathered along Bedok Rise, which is near the Tanah Merah MRT station, for a quick debrief yesterday evening and were observed by this blogger. The group stood out in the quiet estate because I have seen police surveillance teams in action and somehow sensed the group did not fit in with the streetscape.

One officer was overheard updating an unnamed party via mobilephone that there were x targets for the day and the maid at one premises was not in.

What gave the game away was an A4 size colour photocopy of two pictures in a local newspaper story that compared the real picture with a fake image of the anonymous soldier, believed to be a full-time National Serviceman (NSF), and a woman whom netizens believe is his domestic helper. Pictures in the 90C story were enlarged and printed in portrait format, possibly to serve as a handy reference for the officers. (By uncanny coincidence, I used the same picture as reference but saved an image of the newspaper article on my mobilephone. I felt it was more discrete as observers would think I was checking my SMS messages whenever I looked at the image on the phone.)

To read on, click here.

Do you think the SAF should have embarked on this manhunt? Click here to join the poll!

For a full-time National Serviceman’s views on the maid issue, click here.

To find out who is REALLY behind the photo, click here.

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