Tag Archive | "retire"

S’pore retires letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

S’pore retires letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

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This is to ensure no one else can have the same initials or name as him.

lee-kuan-yew-lying-in-state

As tributes continue to pour in for Lee Kuan Yew following the tribute-filled period this past week, Singapore has announced it will has retired the letters “L”, “K” and “Y” from the alphabet.

This is done to honour Lee Kuan Yew so that no one in Singapore can ever share his initials or name.

Singaporeans from all walks of life said they agree with this move as it will help cement Lee Kuan Yew’s memory in our collective consciousness as any time the letters “L”, “K” or “Y” is mentioned, it will call him to memory.

One Singaporean, Mei You Leow, said: “If Singapore is thinking of survival without Lee Kuan Yew in a post-Lee Kuan Yew era, Singaporeans must be able to get along fine with just 23 letters in the alphabet compared to 26.”

“By being able to continue to survive with 23 letters, we will prove to the world we can overcome any adversity thrown our way without Lee Kuan Yew around.”

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans find closure as Wong Kan Seng steps down 7 years after Mas Selamat escape

S’poreans find closure as Wong Kan Seng steps down 7 years after Mas Selamat escape

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This has brought an end to an unsavoury chapter in many Singaporeans’ lives.

wong-kan-seng

Singaporeans from all walks of life closed their eyes briefly, held hands on the streets with strangers and uttered the words “It’s finally over” repeatedly under their breath this afternoon, as many others wept uncontrollably as they visibly tried to hold back their emotions.

This after they heard today that ex-deputy prime minister Wong Kan Seng announced he is stepping down from political office and will effectively retire, putting an end to what has been an unsavoury chapter in Singapore’s history.

His announcement comes seven years after alleged terrorist Mas Selamat Kastari escaped from the Whitley Road Detention Centre in Onraet Road on Feb. 27, 2008.

At that time, Wong was the then Minister for Home Affairs and did not step down despite the public opprobrium and demands that he did, because his skin is quite thick.

Like a gangrenous pus-filled scar that refused to heal but continue to fester with maggots, that incident was left unsettled, even though Mas Selamat was recaptured in Johor Bahru over a year later.

For many Singaporeans, the memory of that painful incident has been etched into their consciousness and would not go away, like a purple dinosaur doing the boogie-woogie while laughing hysterically and eating cream filled pies.

One Singaporean, Tui Xiu, said she is finally able to move on with her life now that Wong is out of politics for good: “Since that day Feb. 27, 2008, my heart has been heavy and I have carried this burden with me for so long.”

“How could Singapore even let a person who could be a dangerous terrorist escape? And worse, no one actually took responsibility for it?”

“I hope Wong Kan Seng can have a short chat with Minister Khaw Boon Wan, to talk about the benefits of practising hara-kiri.”

Other Singaporeans said finding closure has always been their sole purpose and with this announcement that Wong is done for, it will greatly help bring reconciliation while hastening the period of healing to begin in earnest.

Another Singaporean, Zhen Zha, said: “The period of healing and getting back on our feet has begun.”

“The last seven years were dark ones for this country as Wong Kan Seng’s persistent presence has been a reminder of our national security failure.”

“Even throughout the SG50 Aug. 9 national day celebration, there was an ominous pall that could not be lifted.”

“However, now it’s gone.”

At press time, Singaporeans are proposing having another SG50 National Day celebration to mark the true start of Singapore’s new beginning and progress.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans find closure as ex-DPM Wong Kan Seng steps down 7 years after Mas Selamat escape

S’poreans find closure as ex-DPM Wong Kan Seng steps down 7 years after Mas Selamat escape

Tags: , ,


This has brought an end to an unsavoury chapter in many Singaporeans’ lives.

wong-kan-seng

Singaporeans from all walks of life closed their eyes briefly, held hands on the streets with strangers and uttered the words “It’s finally over” repeatedly under their breath this afternoon, as many others wept uncontrollably as they visibly tried to hold back their emotions.

This after they heard today that ex-deputy prime minister Wong Kan Seng announced he is stepping down from political office and will effectively retire, putting an end to what has been an unsavoury chapter in Singapore’s history.

His announcement comes seven years after alleged terrorist Mas Selamat Kastari escaped from the Whitley Road Detention Centre in Onraet Road on Feb. 27, 2008.

At that time, Wong was the then Minister for Home Affairs and did not step down despite the public opprobrium and demands that he did, because his skin is quite thick.

Like a gangrenous pus-filled scar that refused to heal but continue to fester with maggots, that incident was left unsettled, even though Mas Selamat was recaptured in Johor Bahru over a year later.

For many Singaporeans, the memory of that painful incident has been etched into their consciousness and would not go away, like a purple dinosaur doing the boogie-woogie while laughing hysterically and eating cream filled pies.

One Singaporean, Tui Xiu, said she is finally able to move on with her life now that Wong is out of politics for good: “Since that day Feb. 27, 2008, my heart has been heavy and I have carried this burden with me for so long.”

“How could Singapore even let a person who could be a dangerous terrorist escape? And worse, no one actually took responsibility for it?”

“I hope Wong Kan Seng can have a short chat with Minister Khaw Boon Wan, to talk about the benefits of practising hara-kiri.”

Other Singaporeans said finding closure has always been their sole purpose and with this announcement that Wong is done for, it will greatly help bring reconciliation while hastening the period of healing to begin in earnest.

Another Singaporean, Zhen Zha, said: “The period of healing and getting back on our feet has begun.”

“The last seven years were dark ones for this country as Wong Kan Seng’s persistent presence has been a reminder of our national security failure.”

“Even throughout the SG50 Aug. 9 national day celebration, there was an ominous pall that could not be lifted.”

“However, now it’s gone.”

At press time, Singaporeans are proposing having another SG50 National Day celebration to mark the true start of Singapore’s new beginning and progress.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to news that Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew is retiring from politics

S’poreans react to news that Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew is retiring from politics

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

lui-tuck-yew-retire

Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew will be retiring from politics and will not stand for re-election in the coming General Election.

Lui was appointed Minister for Transport on May 21, 2011.

He was first elected as Member of Parliament for Tanjong Pagar Group Representation Constituency (GRC) in 2006.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “I also wouldn’t mind getting paid millions of dollars a year and unable to solve the transport problem.”
Ba Wang Chan, 45-year-old taxi driver

 

sian-half-uncle “So he also don’t need to commit hara-kiri like how Mah Bow Tan also doesn’t have to commit hara-kiri?”
Hor Yee See, 68-year-old ex-triad member

 

happy-bird-girl “When the train breaks down again, I don’t know if I can say ‘Tuck Yew’ with the same amount of conviction anymore like when he was still in office.”
Mei Yew Yong, 18-year-old legal assistant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to news that ex-Minister Mah Bow Tan is retiring from politics

S’poreans react to news that ex-Minister Mah Bow Tan is retiring from politics

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

mah-bow-tan-clap-hand

Tampines MP and ex-minister Mah Bow Tan announced that he is retiring from politics saying he will not be standing in the coming elections.

Addressing residents on Aug. 7 at a Tampines East National Day dinner tonight, the PAP veteran who has been in office for 27 years added he is looking for a replacement.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “Whoever succeeds him will have a hard time living up to his failures.”
Zhen Shi Bai, 44-year-old matchmaker

 

sian-half-uncle “So he will walk away scot-free without having to commit hara-kiri?”
Qu Zi Sha, 66-year-old pesticide seller

 

happy-bird-girl “To be fair, he was tasked to solve problems in Singapore that didn’t have solutions. Which proves politicians are useless to begin with.”
Mei Yew Yong, 18-year-old part-time cosmetics tester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 









S’pore to retire letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

S’pore to retire letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

Tags: , , ,


This is to ensure no one else can have the same initials or name as him.

lee-kuan-yew-lying-in-state

As tributes start to pour in for Lee Kuan Yew following the pre-tribute period the past few weeks, Singapore has announced it will be retiring the letters “L”, “K” and “Y” from the alphabet.

This is done to honour Lee Kuan Yew so that no one in Singapore can ever share his initials or name.

Singaporeans from all walks of life said they agree with this move as it will help cement Lee Kuan Yew’s memory in our collective consciousness as any time the letters “L”, “K” or “Y” is mentioned, it will call him to memory.

One Singaporean, Mei You Leow, said: “If Singapore is thinking of survival without Lee Kuan Yew in a post-Lee Kuan Yew era, Singaporeans must be able to get along fine with just 23 letters in the alphabet compared to 26.”

“By being able to continue to survive with 23 letters, we will prove to the world we can overcome any adversity thrown our way without Lee Kuan Yew around.”

 

Can Singapore still be renamed as Lee Kuan Yew then?:

S’pore to be renamed Lee Kuan Yew next year

 

 

 

 

 











CPF Board should change its tagline, says labour economist

CPF Board should change its tagline, says labour economist

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“Saving for Retirement” slogan is not very possible for Singaporeans entering the workforce now.

HDB flat prices are too expensive for people to afford these days and this will affect their quality of life after retirement. True story.

The debate regarding Singaporeans’ Central Provident Fund savings rages on.

Recently, labour economist and associate professor, Hui Weng Tat, who teaches at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, warned that tertiary-educated Singaporeans of today are going to face hard times as they get older and retire.

How so, you ask?

Well, those with diplomas or university degrees who enter the workforce in 2010 and estimated to earn approximately $2,500 monthly income and who go on to buy a five-room flat at $560,000, will end up piss poor by the time they retire at age 65.

The cause? Purchasing a large, expensive flat now or in the near future that will end up as a black hole into which CPF money flows into and possibly, never to come out again.

Ahem, I mean this isn’t exactly the whole truth, as money can be coaxed back out.

However, this is also the crux of the problem: What’s really screwed up these days is that housing prices are going so high as if you’re on weed and they don’t appear to be coming down any time soon or ever again, for that matter.

Historical data shows this to be accurate: Since 1995, the average selling price of a five-room HDB flat has doubled in non-mature estates.

On the other hand, new flats under HDB’s Design, Build and Sell Scheme (DBSS) was already reaching $800,000 last year in Tampines.

Within a decade and a half, it can be expected to surpass the $1 million mark.

The outcome? Future generations are really screwed as they have to work harder and can no longer afford such flats.

Plus, Professor Hui’s findings are worrying for another few related reasons.

The majority of tertiary-educated people may find it hard to sustain their lifestyles after retirement if they relied solely on monthly CPF payouts only.

Because how much did he say will that monthly payment be exactly?

Well, it’d be 22 percent of their last-drawn salary.

This, in English, basically means it is not even going to be enough to feed the family dog.

The international benchmark for allowing people to retire adequately, for your information, is pegged at 66 percent of the last-drawn salary.

This would provide dignity and grace in living out the final days of your life. That means no more cardboard-picking or putting your children on pay-per-view sites on the Internet to acquire paid viewership to help with the bills.

Plus, the current rules which state that the minimum sum of $131,000 needed to be left in CPF accounts for retirement needs is, in essence, a pipe dream.

More than half of those aged 55 years old and above today are already unable to meet this minimum sum.

And for this group, living in their current homes will then become their biggest problem.

Which is why the government came up with the nifty idea recently of encouraging older folks to downgrade to smaller flats to fund their retirement needs.

But that involves displacing old people from the place they grew old in. Which is evil.

Not only will older folks be displaced from their homes they grew old in, they can only monetise it when they are only reaching their twilight years.

So suddenly, you notice this whole system of public housing looks like shit, doesn’t it?

This is a 60-reduction of the original published in The Straits Times on March 21, 2012.

Former MM Lee Kuan Yew: The Singapore vision is your vision, not my vision

Former MM Lee Kuan Yew: The Singapore vision is your vision, not my vision

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You know guys, The Old Man really just wants to retire. Cut him some slack.

By Fang Shihan

He came, he croaked and he curtly rasped his way around questions from all directions. Not that you would expect anything less from Former Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew, who was at the receiving end of the Q&A session organized by the Lee Kuan Yew School of public policy on Wednesday.

The grandfather of Singapore stands tall at 88 years old this year and is clearly still very influential as an international thinker – but reluctantly so.

This was Lee just three years ago with Fareed Zakaria:

A far cry from the disengaged grandaddy that he personified during the Q&A when answers were filled with awkward silences as moderator Kishore Mahbubani struggled to figure out if he’d actually finished his answer.

Arriving onstage with a bandage on his middle finger (we figure he cut  himself while giving the finger to hordes of mangy journalists. Just because he’s badass), wearing office socks paired with a pair of Nike Free running shoes, The Old Man, as he’s fondly known, candidly batted off questions he thought were irrelevant and gave his honest disclaimer about issues he felt he wouldn’t be an expert on.

“If he’s from Sri Lanka then he’ll know more about Sri Lanka than I do,” he replied to a person who wrote in asking about the post-conflict country.

Still, the questions on international relations kept coming, and the fortune cookie insights from the oracle who transformed a tiny rock to a metropolitan city, continued to wow the audience and created headlines.

Not that he appreciated it. At one point, it almost felt like he became increasingly exasperated with the adulation – or maybe it was a case of same set of shitty questions on a different day.

He did however, confidently say that he was an expert on Singapore issues. And this is where New Nation comes in.

We asked him if his public appearances during the general elections affected PM Lee’s chances of winning. To which he chuckled:

wHy dO YoU ALL tHiNk I hAvE aLL tHe AnsWeRs???

“I did not appear so often anyway. I have stood down and I don’t know who gave you the impression I appeared so frequently. I have stood down and I am off the press as a focus of attention, and off the electronic media.”

Now the written word doesn’t do him justice. He might sound pompous or even scathing in the reply but in reality, Big Scary former MM Lee Kuan Yew was just one “Girl ar…” short of sounding like any other 88 year old grandfather.

A grandfather that has seen a country from its squalid post-war beginnings to its current cosmopolitan state. Oh and a grandfather that single-handedly destroyed Singapore’s opposition prior to independence.

“Conditions change,” he says. “After long period of quiet, confident rule, a generation that grows up in a period of affluence believes that we have arrived. And as the saying goes, a first world parliament must have a first world opposition. So the restlessness. whether that leads to better governance we have to wait and see.”

So the old man still has problems with a non-one party state, saying that Singapore does not have the critical mass to produce two A-grade political teams.

But grumble as he may – and with that growl of a voice, amplified by the microphone close to his throat it certainly sounded unhappy – he made it clear that his time is over and that Singapore is in the hands of the next generation.

He says, “The vision has to be your vision, not my vision. I’ve lived my life, I’m 88. I’m strolling into the sunset, maybe I’ll stumble towards the end. But you have to have a vision of the kind of Singapore you want and you got to crystallize that and get your leaders to adopt your vision.”

Paraphrased: “I’m done with this shit. It’s your problem now. Let me retire in peace.”

So cut him some slack guys.

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