Tag Archive | "queue"

Silent Majority relieved they can go back into hiding now that 7-day Lee Kuan Yew mourning period is over

Silent Majority relieved they can go back into hiding now that 7-day Lee Kuan Yew mourning period is over

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It was tough on them to show up in public and risk getting photographed and identified.

silent-majority

The Silent Majority, who showed up in full force last week in an unprecedented display of outpouring of grief to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, are relieved they can go back into hiding now that the week-long period of mourning is officially over.

Members of the Silent Majority said their initial fears of being put in the spotlight as attention will be focused on them standing for hours and forming long queues outside Parliament House where Lee Kuan Yew’s body was lying in state were totally founded.

One Silent Majority person, who declined to be named as he doesn’t typically put himself out there like that, said: “It was a harrowing experience for me and the rest of the Silent Majority. We had to stand up for what we believed in publicly for the first time instead of hiding behind the scenes and that was something we are not used to at all.”

“We were so exposed and there was no veil we could hide behind, no safe haven to reside and there were cameras everywhere. There was that risk we would be identified.”

“But luckily there was nightfall, so those of us who are really uncomfortable can blend into the dark, while taking a quiet stand to show our support and respect for Lee Kuan Yew.”

“Glad that we can go back to being unseen now that this is over.”

Other members of the Silent Majority, though, were more coy about their experience, when asked to be interviewed.

One Silent Majority member who has been part of the low-key mainstream for the last few decades, said: “You mean you want a quote from me for an interview? I’m sorry, I don’t have any strong views about this.”

“I am really just a fence-sitter. I don’t feel like I am capable of providing you with a point-of-view.”

“Please, don’t take a photo of me. Wait for me to walk away first. Can give me a two-minute head start?”

 

Don’t worry Silent Majority, Lee Kuan Yew will always be with Yew:

Loud booming voice heard as rainbow appeared over Marina Barrage: ‘I will take care of you all!’

Revoke S’porean citizenship of those who did not pay respects to Lee Kuan Yew

Government underestimated how much S’poreans love Lee Kuan Yew

Government underestimated how much S’poreans love Lee Kuan Yew

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All the online abuse over the years misled the government into believing LKY is unpopular.

queue-lky

After years of abuse by online sites such as The Real Singapore, The Online Citizen and Temasek Review Emeritus casting aspersions on his integrity, the Singapore government announced today that they were taken aback by how much Singaporeans actually still admire, respect and care for Lee Kuan Yew.

This after tens of thousands of Singaporeans rushed to be the first to queue up to pay their last respects to the first prime minister of Singapore lying in state at the Parliament House.

This caused the line to pay respects to extend to several kilometres and visiting hours to be extended to 24 hours.

Hen Ai Ni, a government spokesperson, said he was shocked to see the groundswell of support given the rise of abrasive online speech: “Due to the rise of social media in recent years, we were under the impression that Lee Kuan Yew is highly unpopular as we have seen a lot of derogatory content put out abusing him.”

“This has caused the government to underestimate the amount of support and respect Lee Kuan Yew can still extract from the populace.”

“Because if you based your understanding on what people might be feeling about him from reading online websites like TRS, TOC and TRE, you’d think no one would show up to pay their respects.”

“But we’re so wrong based on what we are seeing today.”

At press time, Singaporeans said these websites can still operate because since they have proven to be not representative of the views on the ground, they also generally demonstrate a failure to influence the population-at-large.

 

Here’s other news to help you make sense of the Singaporean psyche:

S’poreans queue 12 hours to pay respects to Lee Kuan Yew: ‘We’ve trained hard queuing for Hello Kitty’

SMRT train along East West Line observed 20 minutes of silence on March 23, 2015

99% of S’poreans found out about LKY’s passing while checking their phone in bed, dreading work on Monday

S’poreans queue 12 hours to pay respects to Lee Kuan Yew: ‘We’ve trained hard queuing for Hello Kitty’

S’poreans queue 12 hours to pay respects to Lee Kuan Yew: ‘We’ve trained hard queuing for Hello Kitty’

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All those years of training have paid off.

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

Singaporeans from all walks of life who have no qualms standing in line outdoors braving the elements to queue for things, said they are mentally and physically prepared for this day.

This after the line to pay their last respects to the late Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House has stretched for 4km long on March 25, 2015, the first day the wake is opened up to the public.

One Singaporean, Bai Dui, said, “I am prepared to queue for as long as it takes. We’ve trained hard our adult lives for this. It has culminated to this.”

“All those nights we spent queuing up for Hello Kitty plush toys has paid off. If we can spend one night queuing for Hello Kitty, we can spend one month out in the open if that is what it takes now.”

Other Singaporeans said they finally understood why queuing has been instituted as part of the national psyche.

Tan Ku Gu, another local, said: “If people can stand three days in the open for the Subaru Impreza Challenge every year for 80 hours, there is nothing that will stop us now. Nothing.”

“I’m prepared to come back everyday and queue until Saturday.”

 

Here’s other news to help you make sense of the Singaporean psyche:

SMRT train along East West Line observed 20 minutes of silence on March 23, 2015

99% of S’poreans found out about LKY’s passing while checking their phone in bed, dreading work on Monday