Tag Archive | "protest"

Scientists: Burning PM Lee Hsien Loong’s effigy need not necessarily cause Amos Yee’s release from remand

Scientists: Burning PM Lee Hsien Loong’s effigy need not necessarily cause Amos Yee’s release from remand

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Role of causal thinking needs to be reexamined, magical realism to be debunked.

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Leading scientists from all fields of study have come out to clarify that the burning of effigies will not necessarily cause the desired outcomes that burners of effigies hope will eventually happen.

This after 50 protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday burnt effigies of Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and first prime minister Lee Kuan Yew at a demonstration held near the Singapore Consulate in Admiralty district — one day ahead of Amos Yee’s expected sentencing — to demand the release of the Singaporean teen blogger.

However, leading scientists have since reiterated their stand that the role of causal thinking needs to be examined more thoroughly, as doing one action does not necessarily lead to a specific reaction that is the desired outcome.

One scientist, Ke Xue Jia, said: “This belief that burning the effigies of statesmen would cause a person held in prison or remand to be released is mainly based on superstitious reasoning.”

“We are not sure what exactly led the protesters to try burning effigies in the first place when the success rate is at best shady, and at worst, random.”

“This makes their actions rather meaningless, especially from an evolutionary point-of-view, as how does this pointless act of burning even contribute to the success of the human species?”

Other scientists say protesters will be better equipped to deal with such future situations if they bothered to properly test their beliefs, treating each idea they have as a provisionally accepted hypothesis, and from there, eliminate false beliefs while extending their findings so that they only do what really works and not waste time and energy being occupied on efforts that don’t pay off.

Another scientist, Zhen Chong Ming, said: “To conduct a proper experiment, there has to be separate testable conditions: One where only one effigy is burnt and measure what the effect is, and slowly move on to burning more effigies to see if it improves the success rate and efficacy of incinerating symbolic items to reach a desired outcome.”

“Or else, blindly burning things randomly is the same as blindly incarcerating individuals for speaking out, thinking that this will have a chilling effect on society without first considering that any desired effects will be negated, or worse, amplified due to positive feedback loops, especially in the realm of social behaviour.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Hong Lim Park fanatics to protest: ‘Jobs For Dummies, NS For S’poreans’

Hong Lim Park fanatics to protest: ‘Jobs For Dummies, NS For S’poreans’

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They want to protest against dummies taking over the population.

jobs-for-dummies

Hong Lim Park fanatics from some walks of life, who don’t have jobs because globalisation and liberal foreign talent policy, are going to start a protest.

This after they spotted a dummy by the road side performing a job that could otherwise have gone to a Singaporean, which drew howls of protest from some quarters in society.

Filbert Foh, a local disenfranchised Singaporean for Singapore, said: “Why are we made to compete with dummies for job?”

“NS for locals but jobs for dummies!”

“I did not serve NS to protect dummies who come here to take away our jobs.”

Other Singaporeans for Singapore who are upset said this will only lead to more oppression of Singaporeans.

Milbert Moh, another Singaporean for Singapore, said defensively: “First, we lose our jobs to foreigners. Next thing what will happen? Give jobs to dummies who don’t have proper qualification?”

At press time, it is reported that non-locals who have degrees from non-accredited universities and degree mills are still finding employment in Singapore.

 

Previously on ‘Jobs For ______, NS For Singaporeans':

S’poreans to protest use of drones in F&B: ‘NS For Locals, Jobs For Robots!’

 





S’poreans to protest use of drones in F&B: ‘NS For Locals, Jobs For Robots!’

S’poreans to protest use of drones in F&B: ‘NS For Locals, Jobs For Robots!’

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They demand answers as to why robots are taking their jobs.

timbre-drone

Singaporeans from some walks of life, who don’t have jobs because globalisation and liberal foreign talent policy, are going to start a protest at Hong Lim Park this weekend.

This after it was announced that bar-with-music Timbre will be deploying drones to displace human waiters to serve food and drinks at their establishments.

However, this move has drawn howls of protest from some quarters in society.

One upset Singaporean, Filbert Foh, a local disenfranchised Singaporean for Singapore, said: “NS for locals but jobs for robots!”

“First, we lose our jobs to foreigners. Now, we lose our jobs to robots. Next thing what will happen? Give PR and citizenship to robots too?”

“I did not serve NS to protect robots who come here to take away our jobs.”

Other Singaporeans for Singapore who are upset said this will only lead to more oppression of Singaporeans.

Milbert Moh, another Singaporean for Singapore, said defensively: “First, robots will take away our jobs. Next thing we know, they will take away our women and HDB flats as well.”

At press time, it was reported that Tinder is taking some women away from some Singaporean husbands.

 

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Anti-China Vietnamese protesters apologise to S’pore after wrongly setting fire to S’pore-run industrial parks thinking S’pore is in China

Anti-China Vietnamese protesters apologise to S’pore after wrongly setting fire to S’pore-run industrial parks thinking S’pore is in China

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Lack of maps in Vietnam to blame for geographical misunderstanding.

vietnam-singapore-china

Anti-China Vietnamese mobs, who set fire to factories in two Singapore-run industrial parks and trashed many more in southern Vietnam, have apologised to Singapore.

This after the anti-Chinese Vietnamese protesters mistakenly thought Singapore is in China.

They are angry over the recent deployment by China of an oil rig in disputed Southeast Asian waters.

VSIP Binh Duong industrial parks 1 and 2 are managed by a unit of Singapore’s Sembcorp Industries.

One anti-China Vietnamese protester, Thinc Yong An Yeurn, said that he is very, very solly about what happened: “I am very, very solly. I burn wrong building. I thought Singapore is in China. But after I pour the kerosene and burn the place down, I check the map again and think, ‘Oh shit, oh shit. Singapore is at the equator.'”

“I don’t have enough Vietnamese dong to give you. You can have some pho.”

S’poreans upset May Day protest showed S’poreans are not really that dissatisfied

S’poreans upset May Day protest showed S’poreans are not really that dissatisfied

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They blame Hong Lim rally for blowing their cover and showing that Singaporeans are actually still okay.

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who are generally still okay with life in Singapore, are pointing their finger at Gilbert Goh, the organiser of the May Day protest rally at Hong Lim Park and blaming him for blowing their cover.

They are saying that the poor turnout for the protest held on May 1 at the Speakers’ Corner, which attracted only about 200 people, has served to show that Singaporeans are actually not that dissatisfied enough to turn up in larger, angrier numbers.

The small turnout has only served to blow the cover for the majority, who had hoped that the loud online opposition all these while, had successfully masqueraded as a real sentiment of dissatisfaction.

Now the authorities might not pander to the citizens as a result.

Pian Ren De, a local, said: “Judging by the miserable 200 protesters who attended, this is a terrible advertisement for the so-called dissatisfaction of Singaporeans.”

“For the last three years, the government and the silent majority have been convinced that Singaporeans, overall, are unhappy with the authorities and policies mandated.”

“Now the government know that all that unhappiness online is just fronting. This will undoubtedly weaken Singaporeans’ collective bargaining power.”

More protesters against fare hike could have showed up at Hong Lim Park if they did not lose their way

More protesters against fare hike could have showed up at Hong Lim Park if they did not lose their way

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Thousands of Hong Lim Park protesters failed to get to venue when they boycotted public transport as symbolic statement.

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

In a bid to make a protest statement against the recent public transport fare hike, several thousand Singaporeans boycotted taking the buses and trains on Jan. 25 as they decided to make their way on foot or bicycle to Hong Lim Park to join the protest against the increase in transport costs.

However, only 300 protesters eventually showed up, close to 90 minutes late, as thousands of others got lost along the way and didn’t make it altogether.

One of the protesters who got lost, Mi Lu Le, said: “I wanted to walk from Ang Mo Kio to Hong Lim Park. But by the time I got to Ang Mo Kio Avenue 10, I got tired and went to drink beer at the coffee shop.”

“I took a cab home afterwards.”

However, those who failed to make the protest were grateful that they got lost.

This after they found out that the protest organiser, Gilbert Goh, asked protesters who were gathered at Hong Lim Park to spit on their EZ-Link cards as a sign of displeasure.

One Singaporean, Hoh Lan Kia, who did not attend the protest as a result of not taking public transport to the venue, said: “I heard a lot of the protesters spit already then remembered never bring tissue, then cannot clean the nua. Fail.”

Tourists excited to see S’poreans protesting

Tourists excited to see S’poreans protesting

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Tour groups highlight Hong Lim May Day Protest as a place of interest to visit.

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The upcoming May Day Protest at Hong Lim Park is not only drawing the attention of local authorities — it is widely anticipated by tourists who will be in Singapore on May 1.

This is due to the rarity of public protests here.

And many tourists will be flocking to where the action is as they are already exchanging tips on online travel forums, excitedly mentioning Hong Lim Park as a major place of interest to visit.

A European tourist, Fromme Elleswear, said: “Seeing Singaporeans protesting in public is as rare as witnessing a camel mating with a salmon.”

“It never happens.”

The Hong Lim Park protest is also catching the imagination of tourists from authoritarian landscapes.

Huwantu Id-Sheed, an Arabian man, said: “It would be my pleasure to provide Singaporeans some tips at Hong Lim Park on how to carry a banner and pump their fist in the air while chanting slogans with gusto.”

However, Singaporeans interviewed by New Nation said they are not too keen of the idea that tourists will be at the protest to take their photos.

Boh Tao Nao, a local, said: “First they take our jobs, then they take our public transportation. And then they take our women. After that they also take our flats and our schools.”

“You mean now foreigners want to come and take our photos? I better store my photos in a safe place where they cannot find it.”

S’poreans shocked to find so many of them around

S’poreans shocked to find so many of them around

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Some at Hong Lim Park protest resort to demanding for lesser foreigners, as well as lesser locals by 2030.

Hong Lim Park protest draws a crowd of between 1,000 and 45,000 people, depending on who you ask. (Photo stolen from Choon Hiong)

Hong Lim Park protest draws a crowd of between 1,000 and 45,000 people, depending on who you ask. (Photo stolen from Choon Hiong)

Some Singaporeans among those who turned up in droves to attend the Hong Lim Park protest on Feb. 16, were shocked to see that there were so many of them around.

This caused the initial protest against the PAP government’s plan to increase the population by importing more foreigners to take a turn. Some locals ended up calling on the government to limit the number of Singaporeans as well.

One Singaporean protester, Jin Juay Lang, said: “There is really no place here already. You see for yourself. Cannot stand so many people. So stuffy. Everybody so sticky some more.”

The large turnout for the protest was unexpected, given that there was a heavy downpour. And it was the Chinese New Year weekend.

However, one Singaporean Chinese couple, who are childless, said they “chose” to attend the protest as they “wanted to” support the other protesters even though it was the Chinese New Year weekend.

The man, who refused to be named, said: “I actually came here to siam the Chinese New Year visitation today because every year must give ang bao but cannot receive very siong one, you know.”

Estimates of the number of protesters have ranged from 1,000 as reported by mainstream media to 45,000, according to some online sources on Facebook.

Others who were shocked to see so many Singaporeans congregate at one location, said this reminded them of the good old days of yesteryear when Singaporeans were united together for a common purpose: Such as The Great Singapore Sale 2012.

Da Zhe Kou, a Singaporean shopaholic, said: “This is like Zara. But outdoors. And raining. But the smell is quite similar.”

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