Tag Archive | "prison"

S’poreans urged not to commit crime just to go to same jail as Serina Wee

S’poreans urged not to commit crime just to go to same jail as Serina Wee

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They will each take turns to go to jail to complete her sentence.

serina-wee-prison

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who sometimes let their baser instincts get the better of them, have been advised by the authorities not to do anything foolish.

This after it was discovered that the general sentiment of the population-at-large is that it is okay to commit a crime just to be caught, charged and imprisoned, so as to be held within the same premises as Serina Wee, the Goddess of Nectar and All Things Divine, who will be heading to jail soon.

A state authority, Qu Zuo Lao, said Singaporeans are reminded not to put their future at stake: “We know it is tempting to do something unlawful just to go to prison and feel good knowing you are in the vicinity of Serina Wee, I have to go stab somebody now.”

“I mean, you have to think twice and check yourself and not go about violating the law, excuse me, while I go start a riot.”

“Wait, I mean, if you really have to commit a crime, do it for its own merit and not because it gives you comfort knowing you are within a 1km radius of Serina Wee.”

“I need to go steal something. I mean, be right back.”

At press time, the state has also put to rest all rumours that there is a possibility of organising inter-gender cell group meetings in prison.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Prisoners opt for death penalty upon hearing appeal for Sun Ho to replace Serina Wee in jail

Prisoners opt for death penalty upon hearing appeal for Sun Ho to replace Serina Wee in jail

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They simply cannot accept this sort of cruel punishment.

sun-ho-jail

Thousands of prisoners from all walks of life currently locked up in jail in Singapore, have handwritten and submitted appeals to pass sentences on themselves retroactively calling for the death penalty to be applied to them en masse.

This after they got wind of the appeal filed by Singaporeans collectively calling for Sun Ho to take over Serina Wee’s jail sentence.

Some prisoners started out in their appeal by reasoning that it is unfair for them to be locked up with Sun Ho.

One prisoner, Fan Fa, who wrote a note pleading for leniency, said: “We inmates are already paying for our crimes by being incarcerated in prison. We do not see the need to be further locked up in the same premises as Sun Ho.”

When they realised this might not sway the decision-makers, many changed tact and accused the move to let Sun Ho take over Serina Wee in prison to be a violation of basic human rights.

One other prisoner, Zuo Lao, wrote: “Being locked up in the same cell with Sun Ho constitutes as a cruel and unusual punishment and will be a human rights violation of the grossest magnitude.”

“As prisoners, we have been locked up with the understanding that we will be treated with some basic dignity. Not this.”

However, if all else fails, the prisoners are mentally prepared to take necessary action.

See Leow, another inamte, wrote: “Death is preferable.”

“If a call for leniency is ignored and the calling out of human rights abuses is not heeded, we will have no choice but to choose to be put to death.”

“We shall opt for the death penalty to be applied to us, as this shall be the last resort and the only form of escape.”

At press time, prisoners hoping that Serina Wee will still be the one going to prison have written in favour of extending their imprisonment.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Prisoners opt for death penalty upon hearing about appeal for Sun Ho to replace Serina Wee in jail

Prisoners opt for death penalty upon hearing about appeal for Sun Ho to replace Serina Wee in jail

Tags: , , ,


They simply cannot accept this sort of cruel punishment.

sun-ho-jail

Thousands of prisoners from all walks of life currently locked up in jail in Singapore, have handwritten and submitted appeals to pass sentences on themselves retroactively calling for the death penalty to be applied to them en masse.

This after they got wind of the appeal filed by Singaporeans collectively calling for Sun Ho to take over Serina Wee’s jail sentence.

Some prisoners started out in their appeal by reasoning that it is unfair for them to be locked up with Sun Ho.

One prisoner, Fan Fa, who wrote a note pleading for leniency, said: “We inmates are already paying for our crimes by being incarcerated in prison. We do not see the need to be further locked up in the same premises as Sun Ho.”

When they realised this might not sway the decision-makers, many changed tact and accused the move to let Sun Ho take over Serina Wee in prison to be a violation of basic human rights.

One other prisoner, Zuo Lao, wrote: “Being locked up in the same cell with Sun Ho constitutes as a cruel and unusual punishment and will be a human rights violation of the grossest magnitude.”

“As prisoners, we have been locked up with the understanding that we will be treated with some basic dignity. Not this.”

However, if all else fails, the prisoners are mentally prepared to take necessary action.

See Leow, another inamte, wrote: “Death is preferable.”

“If a call for leniency is ignored and the calling out of human rights abuses is not heeded, we will have no choice but to choose to be put to death.”

“We shall opt for the death penalty to be applied to us, as this shall be the last resort and the only form of escape.”

At press time, prisoners hoping that Serina Wee will still be the one going to prison have written in favour of extending their imprisonment.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans urged not to commit crime just to be imprisoned within same premises as Serina Wee

S’poreans urged not to commit crime just to be imprisoned within same premises as Serina Wee

Tags: , ,


Commit crime for crime’s sake, they have been reminded.

serina-wee-prison

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who sometimes let their baser instincts get the better of them, have been advised by the authorities not to do anything foolish.

This after it was discovered that the general sentiment of the population-at-large is that it is okay to commit a crime just to be caught, charged and imprisoned, so as to be held within the same premises as Serina Wee, the Goddess of Nectar and All Things Divine, who will be heading to jail come January 2016.

A state authority, Qu Zuo Lao, said Singaporeans are reminded not to put their future at stake: “We know it is tempting to do something unlawful just to go to prison and feel good knowing you are in the vicinity of Serina Wee, I have to go stab somebody now.”

“I mean, you have to think twice and check yourself and not go about violating the law, excuse me, while I go start a riot.”

“Wait, I mean, if you really have to commit a crime, do it for its own merit and not because it gives you comfort knowing you are within a 1km radius of Serina Wee.”

“I need to go steal something. I mean, be right back.”

At press time, the state has also put to rest all rumours that there is a possibility of organising inter-gender cell group meetings in prison.

 

 

 

 

 











Amos Yee held in remand was the best thing that happened to his prison cell mates in a while

Amos Yee held in remand was the best thing that happened to his prison cell mates in a while

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Cell mates admit they will miss him.

amos-yee-banana

Cell mates who shared the same living space as Amos Yee over the weekend when the teenager was held in remand after no one bailed him out, said they enjoyed his company and will “miss the kid”.

This after the former child actor kept his fellow inmates entertained with trivia and his antics to pass the time.

Qu Zuo Lao, one of the inmates, said the 16-year-old’s presence was the best thing that happened to him the last several yaers he was inside: “He was a ball of energy. He entertained us with jokes he learnt surfing the Internet and even did a skit about how general election candidates speak.”

“He talks with this funny accent. In this Hokkien-speaking environment, it was hilarious. He taught us English and we taught him dialect.”

Other inmates said they were not aware that the teenager was a former child actor but said it made sense on hindsight.

Another inmate, Orh Dao Png, said: “He struck up a conversation with one prisoner and then a whole bunch of us were enthralled by his mannerisms and ideas. We hit it off instantaneously.”

“It was almost as if he was put in prison because he was someone who had ideas that are not accepted by society yet. We ended up having long discussions about philosophical questions in life.”

“I’ve been in prison the last 10 years and I was kind of glad to be speaking to someone who just came in and listening to their point-of-view.”

“I was like, ‘Wow, Singapore society has changed since the last time I was out there. The youths these days have a lot of strong independent opinions that are not mainstream’.”

Sources confirmed that the inmate was disappointed when he learnt that Amos Yee is the exception to the rule, as almost all other Singaporeans are still the same as 10 years ago and they are nowhere as critical or as outspoken as him.

 

Prison for all is the way to go:

Cancel March school holidays as collective punishment for student’s insensitive LKY death hoax

Not sure if justice served…

Not sure if justice served…

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…or vicious cycle of life.

Take a look at these drawings done by a local artist by the name of Frankie Chang Inn Kong.

David Marshall

Gandhi

Queen Elizabeth

His Leeness

These were created using a mix of charcoal and lead, and drawn using a cloth instead of a brush.

The method of drawing is unique precisely because the technique was developed and mastered by Frankie when he was serving time in prison and there was a lack of proper drawing tools.

Frankie, you see, spent the last 30 years going in and out of prison for a variety of offences, such as getting involved in drugs, loansharking and robbery.

Woah, we do have a badass over here.

However, Frankie did have a rough childhood, having been abandoned by his parents at the age of five and later ended up on the wrong side of the law multiple times.

But during his final stint in prison, while he was serving nine years for drug trafficking offences in 1999, he wanted to turn over a new leaf.

That was when he finally decided to put his talent to some use, and experimented with charcoal-lead-based “black powder”, an epiphany he had when he pondered about his past dealings with “white powder”, a.k.a. heroin.

He was already an expert in carving, carpentry and drawing then but he could only make do with drawing while in prison because it didn’t require special tools.

(At this point, if you kind of think his story sounds familiar, that’s because Frankie was the poster boy of the Yellow Ribbon Project and his life has been dramatised on TV before.)

By the time he was released from prison in late 2007, reports estimated that he completed between 150 and 200 pieces of his charcoal-lead drawings.

And he was considered rehabilitated enough to contribute actively to the Yellow Ribbon Project.

As life would have it, two weeks after he was out of prison, Frankie was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer and doctors gave him only a few years to live.

He refused treatment initially, due to a lack of cash, but the doctors at Tan Tock Seng Hospital said they would cure him anyway.

In the end,the government subsidised for his surgery,chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Since his final release from prison, Frankie has contributed his artworks to fund-raising events organised by the Yellow Ribbon Project and Singapore Cancer Society.

Today, Frankie is 62 years old.

He makes an average of $1,000 a month and stays in a one-room flat and sleeps on the floor. Whatever he makes from his art, he uses it for his medical treatment.

And guess what? He is on the wrong side of the law again.

He was caught on March 13 with more than 7kg of contraband cigarettes that was bought in Geylang, which he was planning to resell for a profit.

He claims to be in financial difficulty having spent a lot on his medical treatment and suffered losses when he opened an art gallery.

So what is his punishment this time?

He is fined $40,000 for his current offence and has since paid $10,000, and will pay the balance in monthly installments of $1,000.

In other words, a dying man is required to pay for a fine that otherwise might be used to pay for his medical treatment.

This is Frankie:

Frankie Chang Inn Kong

This man is utterly talented, has limited time left and we here at New Nation really don’t know what to make of it.

Should we pool some cash to tide him over? Will that be the right thing for society to do?

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