Tag Archive | "NS"

S’poreans disappointed Amos Yee not doing enough to avoid NS call-up

S’poreans disappointed Amos Yee not doing enough to avoid NS call-up

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He can do more.

amos-yee-chao-keng

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who think conspiratorially, have looked at one another with a side glance and shook their head collectively.

This after they came to the enlightened realisation that teenage anarchist Amos Yee might not be doing enough to get out of serving his National Service stint.

This after Yee posted a video on his own YouTube channel alleging he was assaulted at Jurong Point. This follows news that he is going on trial to faces eight new charges for his online antics barely a year after he was jailed the first time.

The 17-year-old, who is out of school, will most likely be due for NS call-up soon.

One Singaporean, Hock Kian Peng, who served as a store man during NS because he always has an unexplained pain in his knee and reports sick often to get Attend C from the Medical Officer, said: “I have seen all kinds of things before when I went to report sick, but this one, this one is special.”

“This kind is confirm chao keng. Keng until to the max. Keng until Medical Board. Keng until Pes F. Like that you think got any unit dare to let him handle rifle?”

“There is really no other explanation that can account for this behaviour. This one seems hell bent on something else altogether. Not just normal deliquency, not just truancy or sexual frustration.”

“And this one seems too well-planned.”

“If he pulls it off, he will be the most chao keng kia in Singapore’s history of chao keng kias.”

“But alas, the military will still call him up to serve NS because he is still not doing enough.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans see through Amos Yee’s grand plan: Doing everything he can to get out of NS

S’poreans see through Amos Yee’s grand plan: Doing everything he can to get out of NS

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That is the goal, they believe.

amos-yee-composite

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who think conspiratorially, have looked at one another with a side glance and nodded knowingly.

This after they came to the enlightened realisation that teenage anarchist Amos Yee might be doing everything he is currently doing to get out of serving his National Service stint.

The 16-year-old, who is out of school, will most likely be due for NS call-up soon.

One Singaporean, Hock Kian Peng, who served as a store man during NS because he always has an unexplained pain in his knee and reports sick often to get Attend C from the Medical Officer, said: “I have seen all kinds of things before when I went to report sick, but this one, this one is special.”

“This kind is confirm chao keng. Keng until to the max. Keng until Medical Board. Keng until Pes F. Like that you think got any unit dare to let him handle rifle?”

“There is really no other explanation that can account for this behaviour. This one seems hell bent on something else altogether. Not just normal deliquency, not just truancy or sexual frustration.”

“And this one seems too well-planned.”

“If he pulls it off, he will be the most chao keng kia in Singapore’s history of chao keng kias.”

 

Amos Yee under the microscope:

Religious letter writer writes to Amos Yee ex-bailor Vincent Law after molest accusation: ‘Turn the other cheek’

Amos Yee held in remand was the best thing that happened to his prison cell mates in a while

Shadowy State manipulated Amos Yee to make molest allegation, turn on his own side

S’pore bestowed with new martyr as Amos Yee found guilty & convicted

 

 

 

 

 











S’pore start-up pairs maids up with available NS enlistment slots, reservist call-up duty

S’pore start-up pairs maids up with available NS enlistment slots, reservist call-up duty

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This is to further tap on an already existing resource in Singapore.

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

A new start-up in Singapore is offering a value-added service to pair maids up with available slots for National Service enlistment and reservist call-up duty.

This latest start-up, called Zhopeng, comes hot on the heels of a previous start-up that offers butler service to store and wash equipment for NSmen in between in-camp training and even deliver it to the servicemen to the exact location of their next training.

Zhopeng founder, Qu Zuo Bing, said: “Maids have been part of the decisive force. We have seen them in Singapore do everything from carrying equipment when soldiers book out to cleaning and maintaining gear such as ironing uniforms and polishing boots.”

“Therefore, National Service is an institution that has all along trained maids to play a vital role in maintaining Total Defence.”

“The next logical step is to tap this invisible but vital resource and let them enlist into NS and also go for in-camp training.”

Singaporeans from all walks of life who think National Service is a vital part of Singapore, said it is time for Singapore to acknowledge the contribution of maids to National Service efforts.

Hen Gan Dong, a local, said: “I know that Singapore is in safe hands if our maids serve NS and reservist.”

“If maids can take care of our bags, they can take care of the country.”

At press time, the start-up founder said that in the event of war, they are still working on ways to mobilise all maids immediately in the MR, also known as Maids Reserve.

 

Maids for NS:

Thousands of S’porean men say they feel very harassed by MINDEF, especially during NS

Singaporeans biggest threat to Singapore’s growth

 

 

 

 

 











5 reasons Josephine Teo’s service to S’pore must be measured in dollars and cents

5 reasons Josephine Teo’s service to S’pore must be measured in dollars and cents

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Because NSmen get paid such a derisory amount it doesn’t even matter.

joesphine-teo-parliament

In a post-budget 2015 forum on Feb. 26, 2015, Minister of State Josephine Teo was asked if national servicemen should be paid more.

She said she noted the importance of giving NSmen recognition, but service for the country cannot be measured in dollars and cents.

Here are 5 reasons why only Josephine Teo’s contributions to Singapore can be measured in dollars and cents:

 

1. She is from the PAP.

Only dollars and cents apply to them.

 

2. It is a privilege for Singaporean Sons to serve National Service. Being a Minister of State, on the other hand, is a thankless job.

Only money can be used as compensation.

 

3. Because National Service is its own reward.

And because serving Singapore as a Minister of State is not its own reward.

 

4. Because Full-time National Servicemen get paid such a miniscule derisory amount it doesn’t even matter.

Unlike what she gets, which can be counted easily because it is so much.

 

5. She is the bulwark against any invasive force.

She is not part of Total Defence. She is Total Defence itself.

She can singlehandedly defend Singapore’s sovereignty by herself. That’s why only her contributions can be quantified in dollars and cents.

 

Not derisory enough:

NSFs recruits say monthly SAF allowance of $480 not ‘derisory’ enough

Thousands of S’porean men say they feel very harassed by MINDEF, especially during NS

Thousands of S’porean men say they feel very harassed by MINDEF, especially during NS

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This after MINDEF said they feel harassed by a Singaporean Son.

dig-trench-NS

Tens of thousands of Singaporean boys and men from all walks of life who are still serving or have served National Service, have come out to publicly say they feel very harassed by the Ministry of Defence.

This after MINDEF said they feel harassed by a local inventor, Dr Ting Choon Meng, who made some statements, which were deemed worthy enough to have the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) send a lawyer’s letter to him, and which could see the Protection from Harassment Act used against him.

One Singaporean Son, Zho Peng Leow, said MINDEF coming out to admit they feel harassed gave him the courage to also come out to admit he used to feel harassed all the time in NS by MINDEF: “I always felt harassed by MINDEF because I had to do whatever they told me to do and I’m always threatened with punishment if I disobeyed orders.”

“In NS, everyday I was asked to knock it down and do push-ups over minor infringements. I had to stay in. Cut off all my hair. Many times I lacked sleep. Sometimes I do push-ups have to count from minus five to 20, which is a no-no because it is stipulated that soldiers must only do 20 push-ups maximum. So I definitely felt harassed.”

Another Singaporean Son, said he felt even more harassed when he and his platoon were punished even when they followed orders during NS: “I felt very harassed in NS because we were always asked to touch the tree and come back and keep dropping to do push-ups, even when we did what we were told.”

“I honestly felt the most harassed when I was outfield and asked to dig trench. Then after that still kena tekan.”

Other Singaporean Sons said the harassment they experienced can last for many, many years even after they have served NS.

Qu Ah Tee, a NSmen who is not even halfway through his seven high-key and three low-key reservist cycle, said he feels harassed every year as he needs to go back to camp for two to three weeks, take IPPT and if he fails, go complete RT: “This is long-term harassment. You thought the harassment will end with the end of NS. But no. It will carry on. You will keep feeling harassed for at least 10 more years of your life.”

 

More stories about Singaporean Sons feeling harassed:

NSF recruits say monthly SAF allowance of $480 is ‘not derisory enough’

$10,000 notes phased out in S’pore as they are not derisory enough

Boyfriend wins Lee Kuan Yew Award for compelling storytelling

Boyfriend wins Lee Kuan Yew Award for compelling storytelling

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Boyfriend actually convinces his girlfriend to sign on SAF.

ns-bf-stories

The Lee Kuan Yew Award for compelling storytelling will be awarded this year to Boyfriend, the significant other of a girl who was convinced by him and his National Service stories to actually sign on to SAF.

Friends of Boyfriend said he has a habit of making his narratives easily accessible and filled with nuggets of triumphs over struggles and testing of mettle.

Gong Jiao Wey, a close family friend of Boyfriend said: “Ya, Boyfriend has this tendency to regale us with stories about how he fought against adversaries in NS.”

“One time he said he was face-to-face with a space invader, and he blasted it back to Andromeda using the latest nuclear-powered weapon.”

Tales of victory against enemies threatening peace and prosperity isn’t all.

Boyfriend is also known to tell stories about in-fighting, defection and betrayal.

Chu Mai Wo, another friend of Boyfriend said: “And another time, Boyfriend said he and his platoon mates found themselves caught in a mutiny.”

“He singel-handedly turned the siege around by rallying his few peers and overtook destiny.”

“But seriously, if Boyfriend can sweet talk his girlfriend to sign on SAF, he can charm the panties off any girl with his words.”

 

 

 

 

Pampered soldiers? Blame the parents

Pampered soldiers? Blame the parents

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For every pampered Gen Y soldier out there, there are thousands more who are fiercely independent, says full-time National Serviceman Shawn Lim.

IT’S coming to a year since I’ve last blogged, but now I couldn’t resist finally writing in my Moleskine notebook. How apt is it that my last blog post the same topic too.

You would all know by now that a picture involving a maid carrying a backpack for a full-time National Serviceman has generated furore online.  The picture was first posted on Facebook, and soon after, it went viral.

STOMP picked it up, The Straits Times picked it up and as you can always expect from Singaporeans, a big brouhaha was created. It has even resulted in many parodies, such as the one on the left.

Suddenly, every man in my generation who has ever served National Service (NS) or who are serving NS were stereotyped with statements like ‘Aiyo, Gen Y soldiers are softies leh’, ‘Gen Y soldiers too pampered lah’.

But I understand the angry and disappointed reactions from men who have been through NS. Men’s Health writer, Khazmin Juma’In summed it up best when he wrote ‘For many of us guys, it’s a big slap across the face because we’ve all been through (NS)’

Let me put on record that for every Gen Y soldier that you see in the picture above, there are thousands more who are fiercely independent. So nope, Gen Y soldiers are not ‘sisses’, ‘softies’ or whatever that is being labelled on us just because of one picture.

While I draw the line at maids, or even parents helping their sons/employer’s son to wash their uniforms or picking them up from camps, carrying their field pack is downright disgraceful and unacceptable.

Yes, granted that we men have no choice but to serve the nation since it’s a conscripted army, most of us understand that through this process, it will toughen us up and help us grow up.

Basic Military Training in the SAF includes a mandatory confinement where new recruits are not allowed to go home for 2 weeks and are forced to be independent in a new surrounding with new friends and with commanders barking orders at them.

BMT changes a boy’s perception of things, forces him to think of who will he defend when Singapore goes to war. This process is what changes a boy in to a man. Looks like the boy in the picture above did not learn anything.

The boy (I’m refusing to call this recruit a man or even a soldier), has sadly, not seen the significance of serving NS.

There is a belief in some quarters that Gen Y soldiers are ‘spoilt’ and ‘soft’ because their parents pampered them or allowed their maids to treat their sons like kings.

I fully agree with that observation. Yes, the boy is in the wrong in asking the maid to hold his field pack, but the blame lies squarely on the shoulders of the parents.

If you think that this Gen Y is too ‘soft’, it gets worse. In a previous blog post, ‘Spoilt kids: Whose fault?’, I observed maids and parents still feeding kids who looked old enough to eat their food themselves.

General Elections are upon us soon. Calls for the voting age to be reduced from 21 to 18 has been getting louder since the last election.

The argument is that since 18 year olds are already taught to hold a rifle (18 is the age where Singaporean males are conscripted), why can’t they have a say in Singapore’s politics? I hold firm to this argument. But pictures like those above doesn’t help people like me in our quest for the voting the age to be reduced.

It is a vicious cycle. This boy in the picture is being treated like a king by his maid, and he will most likely allow his children to be treated the same way.

Parents, get the picture already? We need men, not boys to defend Singapore when push comes to shove.

This article was originally published on Shawn’s blog. Edited and republished with permission.

To read about how the SAF is allegedly on a manhunt now for the maid and the boy, click here.

To find out who is REALLY behind the photo, click here.

The truth behind the backpack-carrying maid revealed!

The truth behind the backpack-carrying maid revealed!

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Leticia Bongnino, the celebrity maid from The Noose, was behind it all along.

We found this photo circulating on Facebook, and decided to share it with you guys:

Compare this with the original:

The similarities are uncanny!

If you’ve been in Timbuktu all this while, here’s a brief on what happened: A photo depicting a maid carrying the backpack of a National Service man was published on Stomp. The photo created a furore online, and the Singapore Armed Forces even had to issue a response saying they will investigate the matter.

But now that this new revelation has come to light, it should silence the debate.

To read about how the SAF is allegedly on a manhunt now for the maid and the boy, click here.

For a full-time National Serviceman’s views on the maid issue, click here.

The return of Mr X

The return of Mr X

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A peek at what goes on in a reservist “National Education” lecture.

By Alvin Phoon

Even the lao peng (old soldiers) are not spared from National Education efforts by the government. Picture from MR MIYAGI / Creative Commons

Even the lao peng (old soldiers) are not spared from National Education efforts by the government. Picture from MR MIYAGI / Creative Commons

ALMOST A year ago, I wrote an article for The Online Citizen describing my experiences in a “National Education” lecture conducted during my very first reservist training. In it, I described in full detail the tactics of one Mr X, an ‘eloquent, intelligent and charming’ salesman on a government payroll.

His product? Belief. Belief in the ruling party. Belief in protecting our nation. Belief that the life this country… no, this corporation has crafted out for us is exactly what anyone would want.

A year on, Mr X has returned to more or less the same crowd, in a different room, and his topic for the day is religion and race.

Mr X makes his first move. He casually mentions how he used to visit Mersing, and drones on about how it was a tragedy that could’ve been avoided. He moves quickly this time, and hops onto the topic of COE prices. He speaks ill of the ruling party with all the sincerity of a professional poker player playing for the river, then jumps to their defence.

Then he slides his way into the issue of voting. He tells the bunch that the elections are coming, and they must vote. He insist they vote with their head and not with their heart.

“If the PAP has done well, then vote the PAP. If they haven’t, then vote the opposition.”

He goes on to slip in subtle messages on how well the ruling party has done so far, and continues to urge the crowd to vote with their heads. Then, it’s on to the special of the day.

Mr X declares his faith; he is a man of god. A not-so-devout follower of the myth of Christ, who tries his utmost best to uphold the word of his deity. It is around this time that I start to tune out.

“Men like Mr X are crucial to the government’s battle to stay afloat. Their words appeal to the working folks. People who, with all due respect, may not be able to see the big picture. People who fall short when it comes to completing the train of thought.”

Talks on religious and racial harmony don’t interest me, not because I’m not interested in harmony, but because it doesn’t work. Harmony is not harmony when it is enforced by the law. It is simply a rule to follow, a “do it or you’ll be spanked”. Harmony promoted as a law will never be attained, and it is a lesson that Mr X and the government has to learn.

He reveals that there are cracks in our harmony. Stating the obvious is beginning to look more and more like his strong suit. He cites the “little bride” couple as examples of good people who’ve fallen prey to the evangelistic nature of their religion. He maintains that every one of the 10 official religions in Singapore is good, and that we should all adopt a religion as it teaches us morality.

The argument is so teemed with stupidity, yet heads are nodding around the room. This gives Mr X more confidence. He launches into a story about him and his best friend, who is supposedly a Muslim, and how they sit at lunch and learn to be respectful to each other. It is almost as if Mr X’s homo-erotic tendencies are threatening the rip apart the seams that hold them back. He then delivers the final blow:

“If someone insults your religion, don’t throw a punch. Don’t cause trouble. Just walk away and make a police report.”

At that moment, I cannot help but feel like I’ve overestimated Mr X’s intellectual capacity. Either that, or he has grossly underestimated mine. Yet, the heads keep bobbing. The sedition act is good, he says. It keeps us safe. It brings us harmony.

The next bit, I cannot fault. Mr X’s voice thunders as he says these words:

“Religion and politics must NEVER mix.”

I join the gang of bobbleheads for a few seconds. He cites the “allah” issue as proof, though the evidence is thin and I wonder if he even bothered to do his research at all.

Mr X’s conclusion is a list of rules to follow, none of which I bother to listen to. The room applauds him, and I cannot tell if they genuinely believed his talk, or were just glad it was over. Mr X retains the same arrogance he previously exuded, only this time he was less prepared. His eloquence was retained, but his material lacked the same bite it did the first time round.

Still, Mr X delivered a sharp blow to the chin of the lingering doubts lurking in the minds of the men in the room. Men like Mr X are crucial to the government’s battle to stay afloat. Their words appeal to the working folks. People who, with all due respect, may not be able to see the big picture. People who fall short when it comes to completing the train of thought.

It is in these fields where the war is won or lost. The ruling party has infiltrated, and it’s not looking good.

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