Tag Archive | "National Day"

70% of S’poreans can still sing national anthem by making up most words along the way

70% of S’poreans can still sing national anthem by making up most words along the way

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Most say still comfortable singing in large crowds but not alone.

ndp-pledge

A vast majority of Singaporeans from all walks of life, who can ad-lib to go with the flow, said they are still comfortable singing the national anthem in a large group in public instead of alone.

This after it was discovered most Singaporeans cannot pronounce and do not know the exact meaning of the words to Majulah Singapura.

One Singaporean, Chang Guo Ge, said: “If I had to sing it by myself without backing music and other people around to cover vocal duties for me, it would be impossible.”

“A lot of times, I just gloss over the words and make sounds up out of thin air.”

“It’s been like this ever since primary school days.”

Other Singaporeans said the prospect of singing the national anthem is more intimidating than reciting the national pledge.

Some 30 percent of Singaporeans still remember words to the National Pledge after one year of not reciting it.

However, the percentage fluctuates depending on how many new citizens Singapore has in any given year.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Thundery rain arrives on time on Aug. 9 midnight to honour Lee Kuan Yew for S’pore’s 50th national day

Thundery rain arrives on time on Aug. 9 midnight to honour Lee Kuan Yew for S’pore’s 50th national day

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Rain was indented a week ago and it fell right on the dot (pun on little red dot intended).

Photo stolen from here

Photo stolen from here

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who were rudely awakened from their slumber as water kept splashing through their bedroom windows, noticed that the inclement weather that Singapore indented a week ago arrived right on time on Aug. 9, 2015, just after midnight.

Strong howling winds accompanied by thundery rain fell across Singapore north, south, east and west on her 50th national day in a timely manner to pay tribute to her founding prime minister Lee Kuan Yew in a fitting fashion.

One Singaporean, Seah Da Yu, said: “There was no doubt the heavens were crying for Lee Kuan Yew because they miss him and they know Singaporeans miss him. This is the best way our founding prime minister can be remembered.”

“This also shows the PAP government is so powerful, they can control the weather.”

However, not all Singaporeans are satisfied.

Another Singaporean, Jin Kao Lat, said even though the rain fell on time, it was not heavy enough to show the true emotion of the nation’s inhabitants: “I appreciate the meteorological gesture, but not enough trees were uprooted and insufficient places were flooded.”

“If Singaporeans are indeed sincere in paying tribute to Lee Kuan Yew, there should have been gale-force winds accompanied by a sprinkling of hail to really show that Singapore is getting over her loss of Lee Kuan Yew in the first national day without his presence.”

“It would be truly memorable if it rained like never before during the National Day Parade and the whole thing is televised live and repeated ad nauseam for effect.”

“This would really help the government with their future tributes to Lee Kuan Yew because they would have the visuals all on film for future use.”

 

 

 

 

 









55% of S’poreans still remember words to National Pledge after one year of not reciting it

55% of S’poreans still remember words to National Pledge after one year of not reciting it

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This beats last year’s 42 percent figure.

ndp-pledge

Saying it is still relatively easy calling the words to mind if there are other people reciting together at the same time, 55 percent of Singaporeans admitted that they can still remember the words to the National Pledge even when they say it once a year on Aug. 9 during National Day only.

Luan Han Tam, a local, said: “It was pretty easy saying it at first without hesitation. ‘We, the citizens of Singapore. Pledge ourselves as one united people.'”

“This part just rolls off the tongue. But after this line, it tends to get a bit tricky. And you can hear Singaporeans saying it softer after that.”

This 55 percent figure is better than last year’s 42 percent.

Singaporeans who had trouble remembering the words had all along said it is mainly because the words don’t rhyme and the pledge is too long.

Bu Zhuan Xing, a Singaporean, said: “I think if the pledge had rhyming words at the end of every line, it will be easier to remember. Plus, the pledge is a bit too long.”

“For example, why can’t we just say: ‘We the citizens of Singapore. Pledge ourselves to be united forevermore. You are my fire and only desire.’ Then can already what, right?”

However, the percentage of Singaporeans who can recall the pledge still beats the percentage of Singaporeans who can sing the Majulah Singapura national anthem as it is intended and meant.

Currently, about 0 percent of Singaporeans can sing the Singapore national anthem without making up some words.

 

 

 

 

 









S’pore will celebrate Aug. 9 National Day in all 196 countries around the world

S’pore will celebrate Aug. 9 National Day in all 196 countries around the world

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We must show people we are not bigots.

national-day-parade

Singapore has announced that it will celebrate this year’s 49th National Day on Aug. 9 in all 196 countries on the globe to showcase to the world that Singapore is not a bigot.

This is after as many as 137 countries are on the waiting list to celebrate their national days in Singapore, and anyone who disagrees, or is unwilling or flinched at this suggestion, is a bigot.

One pro-Singapore non-bigot, Singh Kapur, said: “To show the world that Singapore is not a bigot, we will let all countries celebrate their national day in Singapore. They are all welcomed to celebrate it in Orchard Road at any day of the year.”

“And to reciprocate, we will return the favour by celebrating Singapore’s national day on Aug. 9 in all countries all over the world. This is to show them that we are not bigots.”

“To make it more exciting for countries who will host us, we will show up unannounced as a surprise for the locals there.”

Mentos, The Freshmaker, wants S’poreans to copulate

Mentos, The Freshmaker, wants S’poreans to copulate

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Newly released video to cause more children, greater debt for parents.

Mentos, The Freshmaker, has released a video titled “Mentos National Night” in line with Singapore’s Aug. 9 National Day.

Calling the celebrations during National Day evening as “National Night”, the video wants Singaporeans to perform their “civic duty” by having sexy times after a culmination of passion and patriotism.

The chorus of the song goes: “It’s National Night/ Yeah/ So let’s make fireworks ignite.”

If it comes to pass, many Singaporean parents will be saddled with debt and children in nine months’ time.

The song also refers to a woman’s body as an electrical appliance, which will draw the ire of AWARE Singapore:

Industry insiders claim that Durex, The Sexmaker, is expected to hit back at The Freshmaker for this marketing stunt as this might cause a dip in their latex sales.

The song, however, has gone down well with Catholics, who frown on the use of contraceptives and the belief that the Earth revolves around the Sun.

Pre-National Day Special Report: S’poreans have it better now

Pre-National Day Special Report: S’poreans have it better now

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Reasons aplenty, as the older generation recounts how far Singapore has come.

Always remember, the past was in black and white or sepia, compared to the millions of bright colours we have now.

As many people are keenly aware, Singapore has gone from Third World cesspool to First World metropolis in 50 years.

Only to fall to Second World mediocrity now as we struggle with inflation, a bulging population that renders everywhere squeezy and public infrastructure that is unfastening at the bolts because it was never made to be abused by so many people all at once.

But boy, how things have changed from Third Word to Second World then.

See Lao Tou, a 97-year-old grandfather of 44 grandchildren who once dabbled in the art of keeping concubines, recalls Singapore’s transformation as he spoke to reporters at the Central Business District: “In the past, Singapore was riddled with Communists. These days, it’s all capitalists pigs only.”

Pointing to Hong Lim Park after a three-and-a-half-hour stroll, the semi-senile man also said: “The roads are now all paved and there’s an abundance of greenery. This is in contrast to the past, where everything was only in black and white or sepia tone.”

And with paved roads, Singapore has become an ideal place for old people to grow up in.

See’s wife, Zhen Nian Qing, recalls being told stories of how less easy things were back in the days where people still threw rocks at the police.

Zhen, a 27-year-old, China-born national, who is both a mother and step-grandmother, said in impeccable Mandarin: “My husband said he had to walk five kilometres with some of his wives last time to see the village doctor, who was also the chief abortionist and cobbler. These days we only need to walk one kilometre.”

Some proof that people only have to walk one kilometre these days:

Gone too are the days of violent ethnic strife.

Zhen said: “In the past, it used to be race versus race. These days, Singaporeans are very united. We locals go up against the foreigners.”

For other people, like 70-year-old Boh Zho Kang, an avid soccer-betting fanatic, togetherness has taken on a wholly different meaning in Singapore today.

He said: “Everyone was very free last time because unemployment was very high but there was work-life balance. So people had time to do leisure things in big groups like support the national soccer team and booing at Malaysia.”

“Therefore, with the state of local football what it is now, it is clear that Singaporeans as a whole are working too much, underpaid and under-appreciated. But employed, nonetheless”

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