Tag Archive | "MediaCorp"

Mediacorp wins big at Mediacorp News Awards 2016

Mediacorp wins big at Mediacorp News Awards 2016

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Suck it, Singapore Press Holdings.

mediacorp-outstanding-3

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe a free and responsible media are the hallmarks of a mature society, have come out to praise Mediacorp.

This after they single-handedly swept all the awards at the 2016 Mediacorp News Awards.

One Singaporean, Mona Poh Lee, said: “It was a nail-biting finish to the end.”

“The only drawback was that the company wasn’t able to reward everyone, including the security guard and janitorial staff, with a prize or award because it will then cost too much and burst the annual budget.”

One of Mediacorp’s most popular reporter, Dian See Kee, said he is heartened that his organisation has come out tops again but also recognises the difficulties of being number one: “You know what’s harder than being in a two-horse race? Being in a one-horse race.”

“Competing against yourself, and winning credibly year after year, is a difficult process.”

When asked if there are plans to be the biggest winner of awards in national broadcasting again next year, Dian said: “We’ll try.”

“Nothing’s guaranteed yet. If we have to do it again, we will,” he said, looking a little sheepish.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Mediacorp wins big at 2016 Mediacorp News Awards

Mediacorp wins big at 2016 Mediacorp News Awards

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Suck it, Singapore Press Holdings.

mediacorp-outstanding

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe a free and responsible media are the hallmarks of a mature society, have come out to praise Mediacorp.

This after they single-handedly swept all the awards at the 2016 Mediacorp News Awards.

One Singaporean, Mona Poh Lee, said: “It was a nail-biting finish to the end.”

“The only drawback was that the company wasn’t able to reward everyone, including the security guard and janitorial staff, with a prize or award because it will then cost too much and burst the annual budget.”

One of Mediacorp’s most popular reporter, Dian See Kee, said he is heartened that his organisation has come out tops again but also recognises the difficulties of being number one: “You know what’s harder than being in a two-horse race? Being in a one-horse race.”

“Competing against yourself, and winning credibly year after year, is a difficult process.”

When asked if there are plans to be the biggest winner of awards in national broadcasting again next year, Dian said: “We’ll try.”

“Nothing’s guaranteed yet. If we have to do it again, we will,” he said, looking a little sheepish.

 

 

 

 

 

 





MediaCorp could close down by October 2015 if 3 artistes continue to quit per month

MediaCorp could close down by October 2015 if 3 artistes continue to quit per month

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National broadcaster could be replaced by YouTube channels.

glenn-ong-quit

Radio DJ Glenn Ong has quit MediaCorp after 19 years with the company.

His departure follows that of ex-colleague Mark Van Cuylenburg a.k.a. The Flying Dutchman, who quit the company less than two weeks ago.

And this was after TV personality Gurmit Singh’s departure last month.

Experts concluded that the mass exodus of artistes could spell the end of MediaCorp by October 2015, if the national broadcaster continues to have three artistes quit per month.

A professional media watcher who paid attention to who quit television and radio, diagnosed the mindset of those who left as wanting to become a fuller person.

Kwa Dian See, a housewife in her mid-forties, said: “The artistes who quit probably realised that it is time to grow up and radio and TV is just a make-believe world and not a real career that contributes to society.”

“Moreover, they are actual human beings rather than just a personality that is stereotyped and assumed to be someone else by the audience.”

“I guess they just want to be able to be themselves and not have to hold back and self-censor, especially when facing the public on TV or on radio and have to be politically-correct.”

“The ability to express a full range of emotions and go through various experiences is valued by the human species.”

 

MediaCorp in the news:

MediaCorp finding it harder to win Television Broadcaster of the Year every year

S’poreans impressed MediaCorp artistes made it this far with poor English skills

Felicia Chin heeds Khaw Boon Wan’s advice, quits NUS

 

 

 

 

 





S’poreans impressed MediaCorp artistes made it this far with poor English skills

S’poreans impressed MediaCorp artistes made it this far with poor English skills

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They must be really blessed.

mediacorp-countdown

Singaporeans from all walks of life with varying levels of bilingualism are clapping their hands in praise.

This after it was revealed that Channel 8 artistes spoke in Mandarin during the MediaCorp New Year countdown programme because they cannot speak English properly.

Remesh Kumar, a minority who was selected to be spokesperson for MediaCorp, issued this statement on Sunday to respond to criticism that artistes on “live” TV spoke too much Cheena:

“Some parts of the show had blocks of Mandarin dialogue as some Channel 8 artistes had chosen to speak Mandarin. To insist that they speak in English, would have meant they might not have been able to express themselves clearly.”

However, this inability to English has deeply impressed Singaporeans.

Jiang Hua Yu, a local said: “This is a sign that the bilingual policy in Singapore education system has worked.”

“Because, apparently, no one needs to understand a word of English you cannot even say, and other people will still give you the time of day as a celebrity and you can still make a decent living in Singapore.”

MediaCorp finding it harder to win Television Broadcaster of the Year every year

MediaCorp finding it harder to win Television Broadcaster of the Year every year

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Competing against itself every year is making the result too predictable.

mediacorp-top-broadcaster

MediaCorp has been named overall Television Broadcaster of the Year again this year.

It is the umpteenth consecutive year that it has taken the title. Previous winners include SBC and TCS.

MediaCorp’s top executive, Ying Guan Jun, said he is heartened that his organisation has come out tops again but also recognises the difficulties of being number one: “You know what’s harder than being in a two-horse race? Being in a one-horse race.”

“Competing against yourself, and winning credibly year after year, is a difficult process.”

When asked if there are plans to be the top broadcaster again next year, Guan said: “We’ll try.”

“Nothing’s guaranteed yet. If we have to do it again, we will,” he said, looking a little sheepish.

 

 

 

 

MediaCorp’s The Final 1 getting hijacked

MediaCorp’s The Final 1 getting hijacked

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Social media stealing a win for underdog.

yuresh

MediaCorp’s latest sitcom, The Final 1, has had brickbats thrown its way ever since it debuted on television some time this year.

Among its naysayers, the regular complaints include not enough talent and poor music.

But a silver lining has emerged: Some social media sites are actively encouraging the pubic-at-large to vote for the underdog.

In this case, it happens to be Yuresh Balakrishnan, no known relation to Vivian Balakrishnan.

Supporters have said they like Yuresh because he looks like he can sing.

One Singaporean man, Tan Ji Ta, said: “He holds a guitar. So I guess… yeah.”

Facebook pages such as SMRT Ltd (Feedback), 9gag Singapore and overrated website New Nation are stealing a win for Yuresh.

However, the bid to make Yuresh win has hit a snag.

Another local, Wan Dian Nao, said: “I don’t know even how to vote. The last time I watched TV was four years ago.”

Channel 8’s most depressing variety programme about getting hitched

Channel 8’s most depressing variety programme about getting hitched

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Find out why.

Debuting on MediaCorpse’s Channel 8 this evening is a variety programme called Love In Progress.

Three guys and three girls will pair off and for some reason or another and if the gods forbid, they will get hitched and form a nuclear family unit that Lee Hsien Loong would approve.

The host of the show is none other than Quan Yifeng.

A divorcee. FAIL.

Dafuq did I just watch?

Key debates at Channel NewsAsia’s political forum

Key debates at Channel NewsAsia’s political forum

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Debate centred around economic issues; Opposition wins by a whisker.

By Terence Lee

On GST

Singapore Democratic Party (SDP) assistant treasurer Vincent Wijeysingha advocated a zero-rate GST for basic services like food so as to alleviate pressure from lower-income groups.

In response, finance minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam came out robustly in defense of the GST system, saying that most of the revenue generated from the GST comes from the top 40 percent of Singaporeans. The money collected is then given back to the poor through subsidies and handouts. He says that the poor get more from these handouts than the GST they pay.

On a related note, People’s Action Party (PAP) member-of-parliament Josephine Teo claims that the government’s Inclusive Growth programme would benefit over 20,000 low wage workers.

Vincent’s suggestion sounds interesting but I wonder how robust it is compared to the government’s existing measures? I also have my doubts about whether the PAP’s current policies are sufficient enough to tackle insufficient wages experienced by the poor.

For instance, while Workfare acts as supplementary income for low-wage workers, much of it goes to the CPF instead of to the worker’s pockets. It’s a pity that the idea of minimum wage was not discussed much.

Result: Tie

On income of the poor

Photo: SILAS HWANG / Creative Commons

Vincent highlights a UBS report stating that the purchasing power of Singaporeans is actually comparable to Russia’s, despite being a “first-rate” economy.

Tharman counters by saying that the UBS report is flawed, without going into specifics. He then mentioned that Singapore’s median income is quite high compared to other countries.

Vincent responds by questioning the validity of median income as an indicator for the well-being of the poor. He then criticises the ministers for their million-dollar salaries, a dig that was ignored.

Finally, Tharman assures viewers that the PAP cares for the welfare of the people. He smartly reemphasises the benefits of the GST system and its trickle-down effect from rich to poor.

Result: PAP wins

On housing

Gerald Giam of the Worker’s Party and Vincent both echo the view that the HDB should be non-profit, something that Minister for National Development Mah Bow Tan would claim is already the case. Gerald goes on to say that prices of HDB flats should be pegged to the cost of flats and not to the resale and private housing market.

Vincent took another tack on the issue, arguing that HDB prices are too high for the lower-income group because they spend too much money from their retirement funds on housing. That’s why they work until the 70s and 80s. Ownership to the home becomes a form of slavery.

“We’re asset secure but income insecure,” he says.

Neither Tharman nor Josephine addressed Gerald’s point. Responding to Vincent, he says that Singaporeans on average use 23 percent of their income to service their housing mortgage, a figure that hasn’t changed much over the years. However, he does not say how the figure is like for the poor.

The PAP reps’ response to the housing debate was not as concise as the GST and income level issues. Neither Vincent’s nor Gerald’s criticisms were successfully rebutted.

Result: Opposition wins

On foreign workers

Photo: KODOMUT / Creative Commons

There isn’t much disagreement between the political parties here: All admit that productivity must go up, while reliance on foreign workers must go down. While the PAP highlighted existing measures to achieve those aims, the opposition (Vincent especially) was quick to point out that the PAP was slow in realising their mistakes.

Vincent, in a ballsy but effective move, interrupted Melissa at one point and mentioned how the PAP was flawed in its measurement of productivity over the past 27 years.

Indeed, a study by the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy indicated that Singapore’s productivity growth has stalled over the years, despite government intervention.

Surely, a sore point for the PAP.

Result: Opposition wins

Other issues

On healthcare, Singapore People’s Party second vice-chairperson Lina Chiam’s assertion about the lack of hospital beds was countered by Tharman’s mention of statistics: Occupancy rate for hospitals is only 85 percent. Of course, this figure should be scrutinised further. Lina went on to say how healthcare costs can be reduced by discouraging medical tourism.

She then goes on a tear by highlighting a smorgasbord of other issues: More critical thinking in schools, better political education for students, more recognition for single mothers. Despite her incoherence, the ideas she mentioned are actually pretty good.

But the bad impression she made negates whatever good things she said.

Vincent, being typically SDP, highlighted exorbitant ministerial salaries and persecution of Opposition figures in the past, although he did not press the point home to the extent where it would challenge entrenched views. These issues were not addressed by Tharman and Josephine, which meant the debate was mainly centred around the economy.

Result: Tie

Final score

PAP: 1; Opposition: 2

I must disclaim that I am effectively pro-opposition. That’s my bias. So I felt the Opposition did better in this debate (whether Singaporeans vote for them is another matter). What’s clear is that Vincent is the star striker amongst them all.

For an assessment of the individual candidate’s performance, click here.

Making disaster porn

Making disaster porn

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Much of the media’s coverage of Japan’s nuclear crisis is overblown, a direct result of the media’s mission to entertain, and not just report news. The writer wishes to remain anonymous.

Losing hope: A woman cries while sitting on a road amid the destroyed city of Natori, Miyagi Prefecture. Photo: REUTERS

STORIES sell. Stories based on a true event that read even better than fiction, even more so. But a story’s still a story: narrative is king and facts are a necessary embellishment.

Facts: Death toll rises above 3,000 after Japan quake, 100,000 presumed dead in 2010 Haiti quake, libya death toll rises to 84 as Gaddafi battles rebels, China quake leaves 25 dead in Southwest China… We could go on playing with the numbers all day though this meaningless data serve little purpose than to legitimize the factuality of the stories.

While compadres in the western online media have started bashing their establishment again, calling the American news networks distributors of disaster porn, us here in Asia have less of a problem with sensationalizing disasters. But the media’s still milking it for all it’s worth.

Take Channel NewsAsia for example. I’m watching their coverage of the radiation leak in Japan as I write this. It’s interesting how they picked that one specific soundbite from Yukio Edano (Japanese chief cabinet secretary) mentioning that radiation will have an effect on human beings, conveniently forgetting the later part when he mentions that radiation outside the safety zone is harmless.

There’s little room to argue that media coverage of any disaster DOESN’T amount to disaster porn. However, this critique, unleashed with good reason during the coverage of the 2010 Haiti quake and most recently, the Middle East uprising, may be a tad unfair on an industry that survives on advertising dollars and/or the number of eyeballs glued on their content.

A wise, and sometimes wisecracking professor of mine said recently in an email:

“My view is that media corporations see themselves as being in the entertainment business and news is considered one form of entertainment. Beyond the stock market round-ups and oil price charts, they really have little interest in what gets sent out by way of “news” so long as it does not interfere with their bottom line. War, chaos human pathos and tragedy sell, so they will always be a feature of the news, as will celebrity scandal, but beyond that very few outlets delve deep into their subject matter or question the logics of the corporate masters.”

Is it always the fault of the big corporate man though? When even self-proclaimed, government subsidized (read: NOT capitalist-driven) MediaCorp chooses to hawk the coverage of Japan’s worst earthquake in recorded history through a mass mailer, it makes you wonder if it’s just the profit incentive that’s driving media organizations to whore their depiction of human tragedy.

Consumer news is never about giving you what you need to know. It’s about giving you what the media thinks you want to know, or what they think you will respond to.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, MediaCorp’s not alone on this. Microsoft came under fire from online vigilantes after bing.com tweeted:

“How you can #SupportJapan – http://binged.it/fEh7iT. For every retweet @bing will give $1 to Japan quake victims up to $100k.”

As the good ol’ capitalist critique goes: it’s all about supply and demand. Everyone loves a scandal. Now when it’s technologically possible to broadcast your opinions worldwide in the comment box below the article, it’s the most controversial stories that get the clicks, tweets, comments and eyeballs. Not the dry factual stuff that gives you what you need to know to form an educated opinion. That’s wikipedia man which , by the way, still asks for donations every now and then. They’re not the ones that are going to send reporters down to war torn countries to give you the facts straight from the fight zone.

Revenue generating news will always be the quotes or stories controversial enough to get you fired up and talking. “ZOMG! Look at how Larry Kudlow debased human life by comparing the death toll with the economic impact! The asshole!”

Hey, but it got you thinking beyond the body count right? If anything, it may have made him a more sought after economic pundit.

Consumer news is never about giving you what you need to know. It’s about giving you what the media thinks you want to know, or what they think you will respond to. Moralists in particular get a field day with each controversy that gives them a chance to evangelize conservatism substantiated with nothing more than horrific pathos.

For instance, nuclear energy opponents the world over, having been ignored the past decade, are now under the spotlight again. “Nuclear energy should never be considered because of what happened at Chernobyl, and Three Mile Island” so they say. The partial reactor meltdown at Three Mile caused no casualties but cost slightly less than $1 billion USD and 12 years to clean up. Analysts are now saying the cost of rebuilding Japan could amount to $228 billion SGD.

Still, a risk is a risk is a risk. This article gives some context to the current nuclear overreaction.

“Every energy source has risks and economic externalities, whether they are noise and bird kills (wind), huge land requirements (solar), rig explosions and tanker spills (oil), or mining accidents (coal).”

Hypothetically, a nuclear fallout could be devastating and will affect many generations to come. Yet compare the number of casualties from nuclear plant-related accidents to say, deaths from coal mining per year and you get a sense of how disproportionate nuclear fear mongering has become. Yes, there could be devastation from nuclear energy but there already is calculable harm done in terms of worker injuries and environmental costs from coal or oil generated energy.

Speaking of oil, does anyone still remember Gaddafi in Libya? What about Saudi Arabia sending in troops to Bahrain this morning to protect the Sunni monarchy? Nah, not so exciting there. The quake provides more drama.

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MediaCorp produces Matrix prequel

MediaCorp produces Matrix prequel

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ICA officer dodges bullet in new action-drama Point of Entry.

By Terence Lee

BY NOW, you would have known (or maybe not) that Channel 5 is screening a new locally-produced crime drama called Point of Entry, now in its third episode.

What you may not have heard is that the drama is actually MediaCorp’s gallant attempt at resurrecting the deadish Matrix franchise. While the final movie of the trilogy may have tanked, you can count on the wonderfully original scriptwriters to breathe new life into it.

So, instead of having super-agents in cool black garb and designer sunglasses, they threw in chic Immigration Checkpoint Authority (ICA) jackets. And rather than having omnipotent bad guys with kick-ass wirefu skills, they were armed with toy sniper rifles loaded with fake-looking CGI bullets.

Yes, bullet time is back in vogue, half a decade after it died. In the first episode featuring stilted action sequences, Vivian de Cruz (played by Pamelyn Chee), an ICA agent, leans back awkwardly to dodge a slo-mo sniper bullet, and then springs back up and starts talking to an approaching colleague as if nothing happened. What flexible spine!

I swear that scene is forever seared in my mind, and will haunt me in my sleep.

The drama claims at the beginning to be “inspired” by real events, but contradicts itself by later saying that any similarities to people or incidents is purely coincidental. It doesn’t know what it wants to be.

If the scriptwriters and producers want to do campy, I’d say milk it for all its worth and produce an action-drama parody. Instead, Point of Entry represents a failed attempt at being serious, leaving the audience in stitches for the wrong reasons.

While the acting is decent, the dialogue and plot are so cliché that viewers wonder where they’ve seen it before: Tough guy Glenn Chua (played by Carl Ng) is the new boss with a perpetual scowl, who comes in to replace a well-loved dead colleague. Taking no heed to the emotional trauma felt by team Epsilon, he barks orders and throws his weight around. Can anyone, even the stereotypical scholarly types, have such low EQ?

It’s a pity really: The series actually has a decent cast and plenty of potential, not to mention eye candy for both ladies and men. The scriptwriters might have succeeded if they did not work beyond their means (and meagre budget) and just focus on the drama.

The series will last 20 episodes, six more than VR Man, the superhero horror show of 1994 that starred James Lye as the good guy with burping – I mean ‘virping’ – as his superpower. And let’s not forget the intimidating sounding Click Click Man, played by Mark Richmond with a fake scar across his face.

Okay, maybe Point of Entry doesn’t sound so bad anymore.

But I wish MediaCorp would actually pour more money into decent shows like The Pupil, a gem of a legal drama that was actually engaging, witty, and well-researched. And it won an award too. Maybe it’s time I start clamouring for a second season to that wonderful series, and demand that Adrian Pang resumes his role as a wisecracking lawyer.

Perhaps I have been too harsh on MediaCorp, and I really am pining for subsequent episodes to dramatically improve (Editor’s note: Episide two, on youth violence, fares slightly better, although it’s overly preachy). Let’s hope that is not wishful thinking, just like how we’ve come to expect ICA agents to possess superpowers. If that were true, then Mas Selamat would never have escaped Singapore.