Tag Archive | "Lee Kuan Yew"

Video for NDP 2016 theme song lacks Lee Kuan Yew

Video for NDP 2016 theme song lacks Lee Kuan Yew

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This song should not have been approved.

tomorrows-here-today

Dear New Nation,

Although the music video for this year’s National Day Parade (NDP) theme song is made in a novel way, I am disappointed with its overall theme, which lacks purpose and Lee Kuan Yew.

It gives the troubling impression of a Singapore of the future as a flimsy and boxed-in cardboard consumerist city-state, instead of a nation built upon real concrete and steel achievements, which characterised previous productions — like what Lee Kuan Yew would have intended.

What I found more disturbing was the lack of representation and Lee Kuan Yew in this production.

Although the featured band 53A has a multiracial make-up, and the performers are also multicultural, the actual footage focuses principally on lead vocalist Sara Wee. Where is Lee Kuan Yew?

The rapidly shifting camera lens pays only passing reference to the rest of the cast, who are mainly young and able-bodied.

Over the years, there has been heightened consciousness about Lee Kuan Yew in Singapore. We celebrate the achievements of female fighter pilots, scientists, Paralympians, as well as a female Speaker of Parliament. And Lee Kuan Yew.

With the elderly population growing, we are adjusting not just physical infrastructure, but also mindsets, so that seniors have a place in the Singapore of the future.

Sadly, the music video for this year’s NDP theme song gives the impression that Singapore is only for the young and beautiful — defined narrowly as the cardboard, fun-loving hipster. This is not the Singapore Lee Kuan Yew would have wanted.

It is good to try out innovative artistic directions, and the production is certainly outstanding as a commercial music video.

But as the video for an NDP theme song, it should encapsulate the social fabric and achievements of its citizenry, and be able to connect to the larger public in more intimate and memorable ways. One must not forget this more solemn purpose.

One must always remember Lee Kuan Yew.

Read the real letter published in The Straits Times Forum on June 22, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Highly religious S’poreans upset Lee Kuan Yew used to push LGBT agenda

Highly religious S’poreans upset Lee Kuan Yew used to push LGBT agenda

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Rainbows are an affront to moral values.

lee-kuan-yew-follow-that-rainbow

Highly religious Singaporeans from that particular walk of life, who like to mind other people’s business, are taking issue with an image of Lee Kuan Yew superimposed over a rainbow.

This after the photo showing Lee Kuan Yew and the rainbow had been making its appearance online these several weeks since March to mark the one-year anniversary of his passing.

One highly religious Singaporean, Qu Jiao Tang, said Singapore must remain vigilant against the LGBT forces: “Rainbows have traditionally been an affront to moral values.”

“Furthermore, the PAP has always been known to be associated with white, which is the colour of light, purity and goodness.”

“The government must step in to regulate the use of Lee Kuan Yew’s image and never allow it to push for the LGBT agenda, such as this case.”

“We must not allow the LGBT forces to misappropriate Lee Kuan Yew’s image for their community’s selfish gains.”

“The perpetrators of this photo must be brought to justice and punished.”

At press time, a crisis is breaking out in the highly religious community as they heard that white light, when passed through a prism, is broken down into its constituent gay rainbow colours.

 

 

 

 

 

 





North-South Line MRT train struck by lightning an omen by Lee Kuan Yew

North-South Line MRT train struck by lightning an omen by Lee Kuan Yew

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Singaporeans, take heed.

lee-kuan-yew-lightning-strike

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who know an omen when they see one as they are very in tuned with the other side, are convinced the North-South Line MRT train struck by lightning on Wednesday, May 11, 2016, had been ordained by Lee Kuan Yew to serve as a warning that something major was about to happen.

The incident occurred during a thunderstorm around 4pm between Yishun and Yio Chu Kang stations, crippling the train.

One Singaporean, Da Lei, said the lightning strike omen was definitely by Lee Kuan Yew as a way to tell Singaporeans he still has their interests at heart: “If you thought the PAP lightning logo and the lightning strike on the MRT train was a sheer coincidence, you obviously deserve to be more religious to strengthen your belief in superstitions.”

“Lee Kuan Yew is watching from up above. He just wants to tell Singaporeans to ready themselves.”

“This is a message for his son.”

Other Singaporeans said this warning and many others that previously appeared in Orchard Road, that included a spate of fires, could have been in response to other unresolved issues in Singapore that Lee Kuan Yew would like to attend to and he is trying to force the hand of the authorities.

One other local, Jian Gui, said: “More warnings will carry on unabated until Lee Kuan Yew’s 38 Oxley Road house is demolished just as he had wished.”

“If his will is to be defied anymore, be prepared for the whole of Ang Mo Kio and Yio Chu Kang to be razed to the ground while the sky turns black and rain lightning bolts.”

 

 

 

 

 





Anti-authoritarian S’poreans purposely worship Lee Kuan Yew to make him cringe

Anti-authoritarian S’poreans purposely worship Lee Kuan Yew to make him cringe

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This is the only way to get even, they figured.

Top photo stolen from here

Top photo stolen from here

Anti-authoritarian Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to stick it to the man, are purposely worshipping Lee Kuan Yew.

This after they read that Lee Kuan Yew’s daughter, Lee Wei Ling, said Lee Kuan Yew will cringe if he knew that multiple gushing tributes have been organised for him on his one-year death anniversary as he does not do hagiography.

This prompted anti-authoritarian Singaporeans to come up with ways to poke him.

One anti-authoritarian Singaporean, Fan Dui Dang, said: “Now when I see Lee Kuan Yew’s photo or picture on television, I will purposely kneel down on the floor and kowtow to him repeatedly.”

“I will do this in public places, at home, at work, at my friend’s place or wherever I am.”

“If this is what it takes to make Lee Kuan Yew cringe and anger him even, I will do it.”

Other Singaporeans said they will not only kowtow repeatedly, but have set up an altar at home and put up his photo on the wall to facilitate the offering of incense, food and gifts, including leftover money that did not get deducted into their CPF accounts.

 

 

 

 

 











S’pore retires letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

S’pore retires letters ‘L’, ‘K’ & ‘Y’ from alphabet into hall of fame to honour Lee Kuan Yew

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This is to ensure no one else can have the same initials or name as him.

lee-kuan-yew-lying-in-state

As tributes continue to pour in for Lee Kuan Yew following the tribute-filled period this past week, Singapore has announced it will has retired the letters “L”, “K” and “Y” from the alphabet.

This is done to honour Lee Kuan Yew so that no one in Singapore can ever share his initials or name.

Singaporeans from all walks of life said they agree with this move as it will help cement Lee Kuan Yew’s memory in our collective consciousness as any time the letters “L”, “K” or “Y” is mentioned, it will call him to memory.

One Singaporean, Mei You Leow, said: “If Singapore is thinking of survival without Lee Kuan Yew in a post-Lee Kuan Yew era, Singaporeans must be able to get along fine with just 23 letters in the alphabet compared to 26.”

“By being able to continue to survive with 23 letters, we will prove to the world we can overcome any adversity thrown our way without Lee Kuan Yew around.”

 

 

 

 

 











Shut down ERP all over S’pore for rest of the month as mark of respect for Lee Kuan Yew

Shut down ERP all over S’pore for rest of the month as mark of respect for Lee Kuan Yew

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He would have wanted it, yes.

erp-singapore

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe they must not shy away from paying tribute to those who deserve it, have formally written to the government urging them to shut down all ERPs for the rest of the month as a mark of respect for the first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew.

This after hundreds of events and tributes have been put up all over Singapore during this one-year anniversary of his passing, but none have been significant enough to impact the DNA of society like a ERP shutdown can.

One Singaporean, Yee Ah Pee, said he understands the rationale behind this gesture: “It was a difficult decision for Lee Kuan Yew to make years ago when he had to even consider allowing ERPs to operate in Singapore.”

“As we have seen so far, ERPs have brought nothing but strive and debt to thousands of people and ruined countless of lives.”

“As a mark of respect, it is imperative for both ERPs be shut down and have all their revenue for the rest of the year donated to charity.”

At press time, Singaporeans are also petitioning the government for free bus and train travel for the rest of the week.

 

 

 

 

 











Revoke S’porean citizenship of those who do not respect Lee Kuan Yew

Revoke S’porean citizenship of those who do not respect Lee Kuan Yew

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Since they don’t fancy him, they don’t deserve to live in Singapore.

gun-carriage-lky

Dear New Nation,

I read with consternation this letter written by a Straits Times reader: “Take those who disrespect Lee Kuan Yew to task“.

In it, the letter writer wrote that individuals who make disparaging comments about Lee Kuan Yew must be taken to task by raising the issue with the relevant authorities or the individuals’ respective professional or governing bodies as there is zero tolerance.

I feel that this letter is disappointing and not representative of the views of true blue Singaporeans, by and large.

This is because the letter writer did not specifically say what should be done to those Singaporeans who did not go to Parliament House personally to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state.

Let me quote you some shocking statistics: Over the last few days, there had been an outpouring of grief and long lines of eight-hour waiting times to pay respects to Lee Kuan Yew.

However, as of Saturday, March 28, 2015, about 330,000 people — equivalent to 10 percent of Singapore’s citizen population — have visited Parliament House to pay their respects to Lee Kuan Yew ahead of his cremation, officials said.

Think about this. Let this sink in.

This means that up to 90 percent of people in Singapore have failed to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew.

90 PERCENT.

This is unacceptable.

Who are these people? Who do they think they are? Or rather, who do they think they can be without Lee Kuan Yew?

It is clear as day to me that this widespread absenteeism must be nipped in the bud.

I strongly urge the authorities to weed out these heretics and put them on a boat at the earliest hour and drive them away from Singapore into the ocean where they can be fed to the fishes.

Revoke their citizenship as they clearly do not appreciate it.

If the authorities do not swiftly act on this complaint, I will have no choice but to take matters into my own hands and seek my own resolution.

Which is to write an angry letter to the Straits Times, which I have full confidence they will publish because they publish anything, and just you wait and see.

Yours sincerely,
A Singaporean Patriot (Non-heretic)

 

 

 

 

 











Those who disrespect Lee Kuan Yew must be taken to task

Those who disrespect Lee Kuan Yew must be taken to task

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There is a limit to what you can say, says The Straits Times letter writer.

lee-kuan-yew-russian

I HAVE heard many disrespectful jokes and opinions regarding Mr Lee Kuan Yew over the past few weeks.

With his death, let all Singaporeans stop tolerating such disrespectful comments made against Mr Lee and take the individuals who make them to task, by raising the issue with the relevant authorities or the individuals’ respective professional or governing bodies.

There is a limit to freedom of expression.

Chia Boon Teck

This is a real letter published in The Straits Times Forum on March 27, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 











Silent Majority anxious about coming back out into open for Lee Kuan Yew’s 1-year death anniversary

Silent Majority anxious about coming back out into open for Lee Kuan Yew’s 1-year death anniversary

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It was tough on them showing up in public and risked getting photographed and identified.

silent-majority

The Silent Majority, who showed up in full force last year in an unprecedented display of outpouring of grief to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, are feeling increasingly anxious.

This after they realise they have to come back out from hiding as the former prime minister’s first year death anniversary is here.

Members of the Silent Majority said their initial fears of being put in the spotlight last year, as attention then will be focused on them standing for hours and forming long queues outside Parliament House where Lee Kuan Yew’s body was lying in state, were totally founded.

One Silent Majority person, who declined to be named as she doesn’t typically put herself out there like that, said: “It was a harrowing experience for me and the rest of the Silent Majority.”

“Thinking about how we now again need to publicly stand up for what we believe in, instead of hiding behind the scenes, is getting me worried.”

“We are going to be so exposed again and there will be no veil we can hide behind, no safe haven to reside and there will be cameras everywhere. There is that risk we are going to be identified.”

“But luckily there will be nightfall, so those of us who are really uncomfortable can blend into the dark, while taking a quiet stand to show our support and respect for Lee Kuan Yew.”

“Still a bit worried though that we have to come back out in the darkness to avoid being seen now that our presence is needed again.”

Other members of the Silent Majority, though, were even more coy about their experience, when asked to be interviewed.

One Silent Majority member who has been part of the low-key mainstream for the last few decades, said: “You mean you want a quote from me for an interview? I’m sorry, I don’t have any strong views about this.”

“I am really just a fence-sitter. I don’t feel like I am capable of providing you with a point-of-view.”

“Please, don’t take a photo of me. Wait for me to walk away first. Can give me a two-minute head start?”

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to kindergarten children made to bow to Lee Kuan Yew poster

S’poreans react to kindergarten children made to bow to Lee Kuan Yew poster

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

kindergarten-kids-bow-lee-kuan-yew-600px

A video secretly taken by a member of the public shows a group of kindergarten children made to bow before a Lee Kuan Yew poster at the behest of their teachers.

The children could be heard readying themselves to bow and told how to bow properly.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “This shows the immaturity of the kindergarten teachers. They should know better that kneeling and prostrating is the way to go.”
Mei Jia Jiao, 42-year-old carpet maker

 

sian-half-uncle “If I saw my kid bowing before Lee Kuan Yew, I would quietly back away because I never knew I had made a woman pregnant.”
Mei Fu Qing, 63-year-old pregnancy kit distributor

 

happy-bird-girl “This is good training for the next generation of kids next time who get to bow down to Lee Hsien Loong’s poster.”
Gui Xia Lai, 17-year-old manicurist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 











Lee Kuan Yew appears in sky, tells S’poreans paying tribute to him to go back to work as economy stalling at 2% per annum

Lee Kuan Yew appears in sky, tells S’poreans paying tribute to him to go back to work as economy stalling at 2% per annum

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We are not Australia where we can rely on natural resources, he berates hordes of well-wishers.

lee-kuan-yew-sky-go-home-600px

A frustrated Lee Kuan Yew appeared in the sky over Singapore with arms akimbo, while looking increasingly agitated this afternoon.

This after hordes of Singaporeans from all walks of life spent their Monday going to various tribute sites located island-wide to remember the late Lee Kuan Yew by.

This caused the first prime minister of Singapore to berate his people, telling them to get their priorities right as they should be at work and not taking time off on a weekday.

A well-wisher, Kum Lan, who went to a tribute site instead of spending more time in the office, said she was told to promptly get lost by the ex-prime minister: “I was at Duxton area paying my respects to Lee Kuan Yew at one of the pop-up tribute sites because it is near my office in Tanjong Pagar.”

“And then all of a sudden, I saw Lee Kuan Yew looking at me from above. He was shining in the sky and he asked me if I was in Brisbane.”

“I said ‘No, Sir. I am proud to be Singaporean in Singapore.'”

“And then he said I should really get lost because only in Australia can people afford not to work and the economy does not stagnate.”

Other Singaporeans who were out and about thinking they can put in 20 minutes of respect-paying time were duly told to get off their laurels and haul Singapore out of the economic doldrums.

Another local, Jiak Zhua, said: “And then this familiar booming voice came from above and it said: ‘This is not a game of cards. Does the economy look like it is humming along at 10 percent per annum? Do you think your HDB monthly installments will automatically pay for itself?'”

“Upon hearing that, I felt the immediate wrath of Lee Kuan Yew bearing down on my mortal body.”

“And then Lee Kuan Yew made me promise not to leave the office until after 10pm for this week and the next, and that I shall not partake in any of the lame tribute events lined up because they do nothing for the economy.”

“I must say, he is right.”

 

 

 

 

 











S’porean family of 5 to undergo plastic surgery to look like Lee Kuan Yew as tribute

S’porean family of 5 to undergo plastic surgery to look like Lee Kuan Yew as tribute

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They feel that most Singaporeans have not gone far enough in respecting Lee Kuan Yew.

lky-family-tribute-plastic-surgery

Declaring the need to respect the late Lee Kuan Yew and keep him in their memory for all time, a Singaporean family of five will undergo plastic surgery to look like the first prime minister of Singapore.

The family, consisting of the father, mother, son and grandparents, will all undergo plastic surgery simultaneously so they will look like the late prime minister at the same time before the one-year anniversary of his passing on March 23 and also to preserve their family resemblance.

Zhen Rong, the mother, said her family is just doing what they can to pay their respects: “Singaporeans are letting the late Lee Kuan Yew’s memory slip away barely one year into his passing”

“We know that it is difficult to embody the principles that Lee Kuan Yew espouse, so we thought it is easier to just look like him and it will remind Singaporeans that Lee Kuan Yew is still here around them today.”

Other Singaporeans who heard of this family’s decision to look like Lee Kuan Yew, said they feel heartened.

One local, Tao Nao Pai, said: “I hope the family can impress upon the current PAP members and MPs that they too need to look like Lee Kuan Yew if they wish to run Singapore in a way befitting of their founder’s legacy. That way, they can start to really be like Lee Kuan Yew.”

“But so far, they have failed, but this doesn’t take away from the fact that this is perhaps one of the better tributes this week.”

 

 

 

 

 











Highly religious S’poreans unhappy Lee Kuan Yew used to push LGBT agenda

Highly religious S’poreans unhappy Lee Kuan Yew used to push LGBT agenda

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Rainbows are an affront to moral values.

lee-kuan-yew-follow-that-rainbow

Highly religious Singaporeans from that particular walk of life, who like to mind other people’s business, are taking issue with an image of Lee Kuan Yew superimposed over a rainbow.

This after the photo showing Lee Kuan Yew and the rainbow is making its appearance online these few days to mark the one-year anniversary of his passing.

One highly religious Singaporean, Qu Jiao Tang, said Singapore must remain vigilant against the LGBT forces: “Rainbows have traditionally been an affront to moral values.”

“Furthermore, the PAP has always been known to be associated with white, which is the colour of light, purity and goodness.”

“The government must step in to regulate the use of Lee Kuan Yew’s image and never allow it to push for the LGBT agenda, such as this case.”

“We must not allow the LGBT forces to misappropriate Lee Kuan Yew’s image for their community’s selfish gains.”

“The perpetrators of this photo must be brought to justice and punished.”

At press time, a crisis is breaking out in the highly religious community as they heard that white light, when passed through a prism, is broken down into its constituent gay rainbow colours.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans disappointed only a few hundred events to be held to remember Lee Kuan Yew

S’poreans disappointed only a few hundred events to be held to remember Lee Kuan Yew

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They were expecting tens of thousands of events.

remember-lee-kuan-yew

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who love authority and are eternally grateful, are shaking their heads in disappointment.

This after they found out that only a few hundred events are being held by individuals and groups in the coming days to remember first prime minister Lee Kuan Yew, whose one-year death anniversary is coming up.

One Singaporean, Soh Nan Guo, said she never expected Singapore to be so backward in preparing for an international event like this: “I am ashamed to call myself Singaporean when I found out there will only be few hundred events to remember Lee Kuan Yew by.”

“We have let standards drop so quickly. It has not even been one year from his passing and we are already struggling to do things properly.”

“I worry about Singapore’s future and how can we proceed if we do not buck up.”

At press time, Singaporeans who feel more should be done are considering emigrating overseas out of shame.

 

 

 

 

 











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