Tag Archive | "HDB"

Give grassroots RC volunteers free HDB flat as benefit, recognition

Give grassroots RC volunteers free HDB flat as benefit, recognition

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And free mangoes.

rc-volunteers-free-hdb

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who take things to their logical conclusions, are demanding more benefits and recognition to be given to grassroots Residents’ Committee volunteers.

This after grassroots volunteers are already receiving benefits from the government for volunteering, such as priority registration for primary school and priority parking for vehicles, but these have been deemed not enough by right-minded Singaporeans.

One Singaporean, Gei Gen Duo, said: “To ensure their heart is in the right place, grassroots RC volunteers must be given free HDB flats as benefit and recognition for their time and hard work.”

“Nothing says gratitude like a free HDB flat.”

“In this way, more ordinary Singaporeans will be inclined to help at the grassroots level and be recognised.”

“Even better, give them free mangoes also. Heard it helps bring people closer to one another.”

However, other locals said such an arrangement might be detrimental.

Poh Lam Pah, another local, said: “It will eventually be difficult to find so many new volunteers to carry the balls of older volunteers.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





Train operator recommends HDB use cable tie to put Tampines sun beam back in place

Train operator recommends HDB use cable tie to put Tampines sun beam back in place

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It will hold in place until the public notices.

tampines-sun-beam

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who can see solutions to problems easily, are applauding the rescue efforts being carried out to salvage a precarious situation.

This after a concrete sunbeam on the exterior of a HDB flat on the fourth floor of Block 201E, Tampines Street 23 collapsed and was put back in place using cable ties.

One Singaporean, Gao Zhao, said this move is not the first time something like this has been done: “We might imagine that this is a critical situation and lives might be at risk, but we must remember this is not the first time this has happened.”

“Previously, cable ties were used to hold critical infrastructure together to make it last for as long as it can last.”

“Look where that got us? Yes, breakdowns every other day, but overall, still functional 90 percent of the time.”

Other locals said they feel safe knowing action has been taken swiftly.

An Quan, another local, said: “Sometimes it is not how well the salvage operation is carried out but how quick it is being rectified.”

“If cable ties worked previously, I don’t see how they shouldn’t hold up now.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





Khaw Boon Wan to stay in HDB flat for 5 years as part of National Service call-up

Khaw Boon Wan to stay in HDB flat for 5 years as part of National Service call-up

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Lower-income heartland Singaporeans look forward to mingling with him.

khaw-boon-wan-bak-chang

A National Service call-up notification alert has been sent National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan.

This after he said on MediaCorp’s Chinese-language station Capital 95.8FM for a live radio talk show on June 23, 2015, that staying in a HDB flat for five years is like males serving NS for two years, which will help nation-building and interaction with the community.

Singaporeans from all walks of life, particularly those who have served NS for two years and who are staying in HDB flats all their lives, said they are excited to hear this news.

One Singaporean, Cheng Hu Chu, said: “I have been serving NS my whole life. In fact, I have served NS twice: Once when I enlisted when I was 18 years old and since young I have been staying in a HDB flat ever since.”

“So that means I’ve done my reservist training twice also, in this case.”

“It is great to see ministers move into HDB flats and serve NS with regular Singaporeans side-by-side and interact with the community.”

“Or else, ministers will not understand what commoners go through in their daily lives because Bukit Timah bungalows don’t offer this kind of perspectives.”

“I hope to see more PAP ministers go for NS soon, in particular, Lee Hsien Loong.”

 

 

 

 

 





Khaw Boon Wan receives National Service call-up, to stay in HDB flat for 5 years

Khaw Boon Wan receives National Service call-up, to stay in HDB flat for 5 years

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This will help him mingle with lower-income heartland Singaporeans.

khaw-boon-wan-bak-chang

National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan has received his National Service call-up notification.

This after he said on MediaCorp’s Chinese-language station Capital 95.8FM for a live radio talk show on June 23, 2015, that staying in a HDB flat for five years is like males serving NS for two years, which will help nation-building and interaction with the community.

Singaporeans from all walks of life, particularly those who have served NS for two years and who are staying in HDB flats all their lives, said they are excited to hear this news.

One Singaporean, Cheng Hu Chu, said: “I have been serving NS my whole life. In fact, I have served NS twice: Once when I enlisted when I was 18 years old and since young I have been staying in a HDB flat ever since.”

“So that means I’ve done my reservist training twice also, in this case.”

“It is great to see ministers move into HDB flats and serve NS with regular Singaporeans side-by-side and interact with the community.”

“Or else, ministers will not understand what commoners go through in their daily lives because Bukit Timah bungalows don’t offer this kind of perspectives.”

“I hope to see more PAP ministers go for NS soon, in particular, Lee Hsien Loong.”

 

Khaw Boon Wan is an excellent speaker:

S’poreans agree with Khaw Boon Wan: ‘We can’t remember the last time anyone used religion to make money’

Numerous PAP MPs put on 24-hour suicide watch after Khaw Boon Wan said commit suicide because of lapses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





7 real reasons you want an open bathroom concept in your HDB flat

7 real reasons you want an open bathroom concept in your HDB flat

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You secretly harbour many fantasies.

Open concept bathrooms: A growing trend in hotels that somehow think it is sensual for people to bathe/ conduct number one/ number two sessions openly in front of someone else who is also occupying the room.

Some might say the open bathroom concept is a unique use of glass, while others feel that it is a validation of the concept of exhibitionism.

Regardless, here are 7 real reasons you want an open bathroom concept in your HDB flat primarily to validate who you are as a person:

 

1. You want to let whoever is in the room with you have no choice but to watch you shit and shower

open-concept-toilet-hdb-01

 

2. You have no concept of privacy because my body is your body

open-concept-toilet-hdb-02

 

3. You have secret fetishes of watching and being watched

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4. This is your concept of romance

open-concept-toilet-hdb-04

 

5. You are an experiential person: You never understood what the meaning of “awkward” meant even when you read about it in the dictionary

open-concept-toilet-hdb-05

 

6. You take pride in knowing other people’s bodies are as flawed as yours

open-concept-toilet-hdb-06

 

7. You’re just a sicko

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Eventually, to each his own. Some of you might have no sense of shame, while some of you lack a vivid imagination so you need to visually see what other people are doing in what is supposed to be the privacy of their enclosed space.

At the end of the day, what really matters to you is that someone else sees your privates.

 

 

 

 





HDB to make carpark lots wider for supercars

HDB to make carpark lots wider for supercars

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NEA to issue directive to Joo Chiat streetwalkers to stand clear of sidewalks.

mcclaren

The HDB will be expanding the width of carpark lots so that supercars’ with doors that open outward and upward can fit comfortably.

This move is to accommodate the increase in the number of supercars on Singapore’s roads, which are owned by people still living in HDB flats.

Property agent, Mai Fang Zhi, said: “The supercars are mainly driven by the ‘new rich’. A lot of them can buy car but cannot buy property, so a lot of them still stay in HDB flats.”

“And a lot of them still go to Joo Chiat neighbourhood to find working girls.”

The National Environmental Agency has since issued a directive to Joo Chiat streetwalkers to remind them to stay clear of the curbs.

This after a lot of them have been hit by supercar doors that open outward and upwards

However, some supercar drivers, such Jia Kwai Cher, are defensive: “Maybe because there are too many street walkers around?”

Synchronised sense of disbelief affects thousands of S’poreans

Synchronised sense of disbelief affects thousands of S’poreans

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Barely six months ago, the news making the rounds was that HDB flats were getting smaller without affecting the standard of living…

Yesterday’s shocking statement attributed to Khaw Boon Wan…

How thousands of Singaporeans felt across the island…

PropertyGuru report 1 HDB report 0

PropertyGuru report 1 HDB report 0

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Why? Simply because HDB is the mother provider of incomplete data.

Are HDB homes expensive to own? Is the Pope Catholic?

A couple of days ago, Yahoo! News carried a report by PropertyGuru stating very plainly that “HDBs are more unaffordable than private homes”.

Basically, this PropertyGuru article said that HDB resale flats are ‘severely unaffordable’.

This result, which was attained after performing some sorcery and mathematics by analysts, is described as “arguably shocking”.

In defence and as a response, HDB issued a rebuttal stating, “PropertyGuru report is based on incomplete data: HDB”.

And you would have thought that with this rebuttal, HDB has come out openly with scores of data and a lot harrumphing to prove that they can provide the fuller picture with nothing but the truth, right?

And then you see this chart provided by HDB in the rebuttal:


And all you can say is:

 

Firstly, when on Earth did a chart with 6 rows and 9 columns become complete date? If HDB wants to debunk PropertyGuru with the “incomplete data” argument, shouldn’t HDB provide more complete data rather than having two play the same game?

Secondly, if you look at the arrow pointing to item 1, you’d giggle.

Because in your mind, this is what you’d think about HDB’s very own incomplete data:

Thirdly, look at the price circled and arrowed no. 2: $384,000 for a 5-room HDB flat.

Hahahahahahahahahaha…

Here’s what you should know.

Just this past week, on March 21, The Straits Times – who are the purveyors of A-star reporting and who embody the gold standard in journalism – ran a report about prominent labour economist and associate professor, Hui Weng Tat, who teaches at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.

The report was about him cautioning in his study that those with diplomas or university degrees who enter the workforce in 2010 and estimated to earn approximately $2,500 monthly income and who go on to buy a five-room flat at $560,000, will end up piss poor and broke ass by the time they retire at age 65.

As you can see, by injecting a bit of realism into the proceedings, you have a labour economist, who is part of the establishment, who believes in his outlook that a five-room flat actually and realistically costs $560,000.

But that’s not the point.

All you have to remember from this episode is that the irony is completely lost on HDB.

By accusing others of basing their argument on “incomplete data”, they have done worse. Much worse.

They are, have been, and always will be the mother provider of incomplete data.

Therefore, HDB, you are a:

Khaw tries to fix Mah’s housing problems

Khaw tries to fix Mah’s housing problems

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Fairer system to kind of level playing field, with more help supposedly going to couples, singles and elderly.

With Singapore’s housing situation in a mess, Khaw Boon Wan, the newly handpicked minister of National Development (pictured left), has come up with a series of schemes and new flat releases to help curb the problems his predecessor Mah Bow Tan could not solve before an incumbent-walloping General Election in May.

Khaw announced, with a lot of enthusiasm, that there will be less help given to the higher-income households seeking to buy a flat because they can afford not to be helped.

This is an attempt to create a fairer, tiered system, in tandem with the Housing and Development Board (HDB) recently raising the income ceiling for those looking to buy homes.

For those purchasing built-to-order (BTO) flats, the income ceiling will be raised from $8,000 to $10,000

For executive condominium flats, they are to go up by $2,000 to $12,000.

Those aged above 55 and wanting to buy a purpose-built studio apartment for the elderly now have an income ceiling of $10,000. Previously it was $8,000.

Therefore, potential buyers whose household income is $10,000 are still eligible to receive the entire Central Provident Fund (CPF) Housing Grant worth $30,000. (Thank goodness…)

Those earning between $10,000 and $11,000, tough luck. They will receive $20,000.

Households that make more than $11,000? Sorry, but tough luck too. They will receive $20,000 as well.

Life is indeed unfair, in case you’re just tuning in.

Furthermore, Khaw said that the HDB will release 8,000 flats (a record number, by the way) next month. (Who said opposition political parties are not effective in bringing about change?)

In total, 25,000 flats are to be released this year. In November, for example, 4,000 built-to-order (BTO) flats will enter the market.

As for 2012 next year, the projection is for a release of another 25,000 flats. (Something Mah probably could not deliver.)

Some of these flats will be in mature estates such as Tampines and Kallang/Whampoa, which are prime locations that are sought-after in the market.

This would allow some potential resale flat buyers to exit the resale market as they will be tempted by brand new flats instead, effectively freeing up space for those single and above 35 years and older, for example. (Or so the theory goes…)

Khaw enthused that this would effectively deal with the housing demand surge.

He gushed: “That’s why I’m so confident that in three, four years’ time, when these units start materialising, whatever pent-up demand, the problem would be largely resolved.”

However, he also stressed: “It can’t happen tomorrow.”

Read the original article here.

Vote out of belief, not fear

Vote out of belief, not fear

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Virgin Voter Dannon Har observes that some of his peers, who work in the public sector, fear voting for the opposition because it might stunt their career prospects.

Proud of being a Virgin Voter? Put this as your Facebook display picture! Enhanced from photo by STEPHANE TOUGARD / Creative Commons

I WILL be voting for my very first time this coming elections. I’m feeling a flurry of excitement coupled with apprehension, and I hope dismay won’t follow after I’ve done the deed.

What brings out such a mixed bag of emotions is that giant question mark bobbing above my head saying: “Does my vote really matter?”

As an average youth living in Meritocratic/Autocratic Singapore, I wonder if my vote will make a difference when opposition giants like JB Jeyaretnam and Chiam See Tong have failed or attained limited success?

Needless to say, the PAP government has been in power since day one. Those who have tried to step up and challenge them have been deliberately quashed under their iron fist.

I’m certainly not exaggerating: Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew admitted as much in his his series of interviews with the Straits Times.

Despite our turbulent political history, what disturbs me much is the indifferent, laidback, nonchalant attitude of many of today’s youths. What disturbs me even more is some of their ignorance or misconceptions.

To be fair, there is a notable rise of youth participation in Singapore’s political scene. Even though there’s plenty of nonconstructive rants online, the fact that more youths are voicing out is at least a sure sign of a diversification of views.

Yet many young Singaporeans only seem to care about the food on their table.

With an overbearing corporatist culture constantly looming over our heads, I fear becoming just another cog in the machine. And I know I am not alone in this.

Singapore’s citizens are described as consumerist, materialistic, and pragmatic. These are now our defining attributes as Singaporeans.

The drastic fall in Total Fertility Rate is a clear sign to me that we are thinking more and more in economic terms, putting all other concerns second place.

In a Straits Times article I read, a lawyer said regarding the reason for not having children: “It’s a question of opportunity cost, and I can’t afford the downtime from my career.”

Political sentiments in Singapore often reflect our materialistic culture.

During sessions of coffee shop talk with peers my age, they tell me they are going to vote for PAP this coming election, as they feel pressured to do so. But Pressured? Pressured by what?

The presence of such fear is a shock to me – regardless of whether there is any truth to it. Why should there even be fear of going against the ruling party – as distinct from the state – in a democratic society?

Apparently, there is an onset of fear about going against the grain. On the ground, there is fear that voting for an opposition party would result in indirect repercussions of some sort.

I hear of comments that are utterly ridiculous. Some tell me that since they work in the public sector, they had better vote for the PAP lest they get stunted career growths and diminished pay packages.

The presence of such fear is a shock to me – regardless of whether there is any truth to it. Why should there even be fear of going against the ruling party – as distinct from the state – in a democratic society?

Such ideas are plainly absurd. Then again, nothing surprises me anymore.

Other comments I’ve heard include feelings of gratitude for what PAP had done for us in the past. With this argument, some think we should continue voting for them since they have done so much for us.

They further add that the good track record is testament that they’ll do as well if not better in the future.

But I say that if a party’s recent track record is any indication, then recent hot potato issues like immigration, housing prices, and ministerial salary among others would indicate that the time for change has come.

I will be voting in Tampines GRC this coming election, where PAP veteran and minister for National Development Mah Bow Tan will be contesting.

He may not be very popular, based on online sentiments, but how many votes will actually swing in his favor simply because of PAP’s dominance?

My personal belief is that each and every contestant should be judged based on what they are really offering on the plate instead of party affiliations or worse, empty promises.

Sadly, the political game is often reduced to a shallow popularity contest rather than a substantial analysis of political manifestos.

In deciding who to vote for, I realise that jumping onto the same bandwagon as everyone else simply displays a lack of forethought on my part. I am given a mind for a reason, and that reason is to reason.

I can’t let others decide for me whom I’m going to vote for.

But I am not blindly advocating western ideals in Singapore, as each country is different and should be run differently. A system that works in one place may not work in another. I’m clear on this.

My beef is with people refusing to stand up for what they believe in, when they should be voicing out their concerns for a future they want to see happening in Singapore.

Seriously, if we look closely enough at the PAP government’s current policies and scrutise it, can we confidently say that we are able to sit down and stay passive?

At 23 years old, I am ready to do the little I can to express my personal beliefs, perspectives, and values in the political realm. It is my own conviction to eliminate indifference among Singaporean youths, starting from myself.

So to all my fellow Virgin Voters out there, be daring enough to do what you sincerely think is right for the sake of our own generation’s future.

And to all experienced voters out there, good for you if you have not compromised your ideals. But if you have and are thinking of voting ‘safely’ time and again, do not for a moment think that others will do the fighting for you.

As Dr Chee Soon Juan once mentioned, “Democracy cannot be wished for, it must be fought for.”

Dannon Har, 23, has studied in neighborhood schools all his life. He is currently majoring in Sociology and minoring in Communications at SIM University while interning at a prominent business news organisation. He spends his free time clearing his school assignments hanging out with his better half who keeps his humanity from dispersing as he chases the Singapore dream.

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PAP can represent everyone’s interest? Thanks, but no thanks

PAP can represent everyone’s interest? Thanks, but no thanks

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Here’s the scary part about last night’s Kent Ridge Ministerial Forum: For a minute there, I actually bought what Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong had to say. But not for long.

By Belmont Lay

The Prime Minister's wife, Ho Ching, was there to lend her quiet support. Photo: FANG SHIHAN

THE gist of Prime Minister Lee’s argument about leadership renewal is pretty straightforward: There really is only one party in Singapore that is wise and talented enough to attract the best and the brightest to lead this country.

And that party happens to be the PAP.

This is a re-iteration of what his father, Lee Kuan Yew, famously once said: If a jumbo jet carrying 300 of Singapore’s top leaders were to crash, Singapore would be finished.

So you want viable opposition parties to be at the helm? Nope, sorry. They are going to find it even harder to attract the best.

You want a two-party system? Nope, not even remotely possible. Not that the PAP did not think about splitting itself into two.

The younger Lee said: “But the most important reason why a two-party system is not workable is because we don’t have enough talent in Singapore to form two A-teams.”

He added: “We are now pulling together the next A-team of Singapore. And the PAP candidates in this round will form key members of this team and in the next couple of rounds.”

Fair and good, right?

Well, not until you take a look at what is happening on the ground in the opposition camp and you can easily dismiss what Lee had to say about the shortage of talent.

The simple fact is that not everyone who is bright and able wants to be part of the PAP.

The National Solidarity Party has two ex-government scholars: Hazel Poa and Tony Tan, as well as a lawyer, Jeanette Chong-Aruldoss.

The Singapore Democratic Party has Dr Vincent Wijeysingha, who worked as a social worker (with a doctorate in social policy) and absolutely rocked at the Channel NewsAsia debate last week.

And short of introducing God himself to run in a GRC, the Workers’ Party has Chen Show Mao.

So, pray tell, I want none of these but Tin Pei Ling? Just because the PAP says she is good?

Why should I trust the PAP’s ability to screen for potential candidates let alone attract top dogs? There is nothing in their mechanisms that inspire confidence or convinces me that they are not just making up numbers or creating the appearance of looking diversified by fielding Tin Pei Ling.

Therefore, two rebuttal points to the PAP system: It reeks of hubris and it has a tendency to breed bureaucratic apparatchiks.

But what really got my goat was what Lee had to say about PAP wanting to represent every Singaporean: “I think we should try to the maximum extent we can, align all the interest of Singaporeans and make sure one party can represent you, whether you are the CEO or whether you are a taxi driver.”

Right…

I just cannot buy the argument that one party can represent the interest of every segment in society.

If you’re gay, or if you’re staunchly single, or if you’re divorced, or if you’re a swinger, or if you’re a single parent, or if you’re homeless, or if you’re liberal-minded, or if you’re a hippie, or if you’re really old, or if you’re really poor, or if you lack next-of-kins, you’re screwed.

Even lesser so, when it is one party trying to be representatives of all the people by manipulating the interests of its citizens.

This is social engineering gone mad.

Let’s not argue about hypotheticals but illustrate using a vivid example: Just look at what happens when you have one Housing Development Board dictating the housing needs of 80% of the population.

The system eventually went tits up late last year when it can no longer make affordable housing to cater to the needs of the masses.

My take on this is pretty simple: If the present Government (a term that was interchangeably used with PAP last night) is indeed as brilliant as it makes itself out to be, it should have been able to create an alternative to the HDB, or made tweaks to refine it.

But it didn’t.

And you ask: Why is there a need for an alternative?

Because public housing, which are built across the island, 1) do not have any quotas reserved solely for local Singaporeans and 2) are subjected to open market competitive pricing, forces prices of housing across the board (private property included) to explode the moment demand goes up.

HDB prices have gone up drastically over the last twenty to thirty years, outgrowing the average Singaporean’s ability to afford them.

And yet the HDB would still insist on providing for the majority, which means it will come back to bite you and me in our asses, because no matter how much richer you can get, you might still end up in a HDB.

Or remain staying with your parents.

I see you have half a million dollars there? I’m sorry, you can probably only afford to buy a three-room flat in Ulu Sungei Goondu, behind Woodlands forested water catchment area, you high-income earner you.

So, here’s the point of today’s missive: If you’re gay, or if you’re staunchly single, or if you’re divorced, or if you’re a swinger, or if you’re a single parent, or if you’re homeless, or if you’re liberal-minded, or if you’re a hippie, or if you’re really old, or if you’re really poor, or if you lack next-of-kins, you’re screwed.

The PAP doesn’t represent your interest at all. It can’t and I won’t even humour myself to say it can.

Period.

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Key debates at Channel NewsAsia’s political forum

Key debates at Channel NewsAsia’s political forum

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Debate centred around economic issues; Opposition wins by a whisker.

By Terence Lee

On GST

Singapore Democratic Party (SDP) assistant treasurer Vincent Wijeysingha advocated a zero-rate GST for basic services like food so as to alleviate pressure from lower-income groups.

In response, finance minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam came out robustly in defense of the GST system, saying that most of the revenue generated from the GST comes from the top 40 percent of Singaporeans. The money collected is then given back to the poor through subsidies and handouts. He says that the poor get more from these handouts than the GST they pay.

On a related note, People’s Action Party (PAP) member-of-parliament Josephine Teo claims that the government’s Inclusive Growth programme would benefit over 20,000 low wage workers.

Vincent’s suggestion sounds interesting but I wonder how robust it is compared to the government’s existing measures? I also have my doubts about whether the PAP’s current policies are sufficient enough to tackle insufficient wages experienced by the poor.

For instance, while Workfare acts as supplementary income for low-wage workers, much of it goes to the CPF instead of to the worker’s pockets. It’s a pity that the idea of minimum wage was not discussed much.

Result: Tie

On income of the poor

Photo: SILAS HWANG / Creative Commons

Vincent highlights a UBS report stating that the purchasing power of Singaporeans is actually comparable to Russia’s, despite being a “first-rate” economy.

Tharman counters by saying that the UBS report is flawed, without going into specifics. He then mentioned that Singapore’s median income is quite high compared to other countries.

Vincent responds by questioning the validity of median income as an indicator for the well-being of the poor. He then criticises the ministers for their million-dollar salaries, a dig that was ignored.

Finally, Tharman assures viewers that the PAP cares for the welfare of the people. He smartly reemphasises the benefits of the GST system and its trickle-down effect from rich to poor.

Result: PAP wins

On housing

Gerald Giam of the Worker’s Party and Vincent both echo the view that the HDB should be non-profit, something that Minister for National Development Mah Bow Tan would claim is already the case. Gerald goes on to say that prices of HDB flats should be pegged to the cost of flats and not to the resale and private housing market.

Vincent took another tack on the issue, arguing that HDB prices are too high for the lower-income group because they spend too much money from their retirement funds on housing. That’s why they work until the 70s and 80s. Ownership to the home becomes a form of slavery.

“We’re asset secure but income insecure,” he says.

Neither Tharman nor Josephine addressed Gerald’s point. Responding to Vincent, he says that Singaporeans on average use 23 percent of their income to service their housing mortgage, a figure that hasn’t changed much over the years. However, he does not say how the figure is like for the poor.

The PAP reps’ response to the housing debate was not as concise as the GST and income level issues. Neither Vincent’s nor Gerald’s criticisms were successfully rebutted.

Result: Opposition wins

On foreign workers

Photo: KODOMUT / Creative Commons

There isn’t much disagreement between the political parties here: All admit that productivity must go up, while reliance on foreign workers must go down. While the PAP highlighted existing measures to achieve those aims, the opposition (Vincent especially) was quick to point out that the PAP was slow in realising their mistakes.

Vincent, in a ballsy but effective move, interrupted Melissa at one point and mentioned how the PAP was flawed in its measurement of productivity over the past 27 years.

Indeed, a study by the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy indicated that Singapore’s productivity growth has stalled over the years, despite government intervention.

Surely, a sore point for the PAP.

Result: Opposition wins

Other issues

On healthcare, Singapore People’s Party second vice-chairperson Lina Chiam’s assertion about the lack of hospital beds was countered by Tharman’s mention of statistics: Occupancy rate for hospitals is only 85 percent. Of course, this figure should be scrutinised further. Lina went on to say how healthcare costs can be reduced by discouraging medical tourism.

She then goes on a tear by highlighting a smorgasbord of other issues: More critical thinking in schools, better political education for students, more recognition for single mothers. Despite her incoherence, the ideas she mentioned are actually pretty good.

But the bad impression she made negates whatever good things she said.

Vincent, being typically SDP, highlighted exorbitant ministerial salaries and persecution of Opposition figures in the past, although he did not press the point home to the extent where it would challenge entrenched views. These issues were not addressed by Tharman and Josephine, which meant the debate was mainly centred around the economy.

Result: Tie

Final score

PAP: 1; Opposition: 2

I must disclaim that I am effectively pro-opposition. That’s my bias. So I felt the Opposition did better in this debate (whether Singaporeans vote for them is another matter). What’s clear is that Vincent is the star striker amongst them all.

For an assessment of the individual candidate’s performance, click here.

Is HDB a good investment? Part 2

Is HDB a good investment? Part 2

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Is HDB a good investment?

Is HDB a good investment?

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