Tag Archive | "elitist JC"

Is this JC kid the only one out there?

Is this JC kid the only one out there?

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By Isaac Ho & Joey Tan

RAWR!

Kid from Temasek Junior College gets jealous that his ITE counterparts have a swimming pool, writes in to TODAY, gets slammed online and has since begged for forgiveness.

His name is Kwek Jian Qiang and there are probably more kids like him out in the wild, stewing in their jealousy that ITE campuses have swimming pools while theirs don’t.

Or maybe it’s just Temasek Junior College.

Or maybe it's the ugly-ass green uniform

Jibes aside, seriously, give Jian Qiang a break!

I bet, being young, stupid (hey, JC kids can be dumb too ok?) and impressionable, he probably got the idea that ITE = “it’s the end” from a scene in Jack Neo’s ‘I Not Stupid’ show where Hui Ge was conversing about ITE with some random hairstylist.

Jian Qiang obviously thinks that getting into a good school is the one and only way to success in life. He’s not alone. Because everyone in this country gets brainwashed from Day Zero in primary school, that excellence = good grades = good schools = the right to feel superior to everyone else.

But it’s not just the education system. Upbringing also plays a huge role in deciding which 17-year olds decide to rant about ITE to a national publication and which decide to take a bus from school to the nearest stadium to use the public pool.

Seriously, Singapore’s a tiny place. Is it so hard to travel a few bus stops to use public facilities?)

I was once a JC kid too. But – dare I say – I was probably brought up differently from the stereotypical JC elitist.

My parents never demanded straight As, nor have they ever given me a dressing down for poor grades. I swear, their responses never really strayed far from the ‘just try your best’ or ‘it’s alright you’ll get it the next time around’.

And unlike what NS-haters might say, joining the army does have its advantages.

Having close to 80 guys under my command made me realize that merit takes many forms and that rewards for merit can come in many forms too. Plus there’s nothing quite like the threat of a blanket party to cut one down to size. I soon realised that even if you do think you’re superior, you’re at the mercy of everyone else in the bunk.

But not everyone gets opportunities for reality check so the harsh question remains, ‘How many more Kwek Jian Qiang’s that Singaporeans got to know on boxing day do we have out there in our schools?