Tag Archive | "election"

If Gurmit Singh can represent Chinese man, Chinese man can represent minorities as president

If Gurmit Singh can represent Chinese man, Chinese man can represent minorities as president

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Singaporeans even forget Gurmit Singh is a minority.

phua-chu-kang-non-chinese-president

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe race-blindness can be a thing, have cited Gurmit Singh’s role as Phua Chu Kang as the pivotal moment in Singapore’s history where race-blindness has set in.

One Singaporean, Ba Yee Xing, said: “If you don’t remind Singaporeans, Singaporeans also forget Gurmit Singh is a minority to begin with.”

“That is why I believe Singaporeans can look past the race and focus on what the job requires.”

Other locals said an ability to not see someone’s racial identity is what allows Gurmit Singh and Singapore’s next president to function as the job requires.

Another local, Zuo Zhong Tong said: “In the same way, if the next president of Singapore is a Chinese man, so be it.”

“As long as he can represent the interests of the minorities and exercise the sovereign powers of the presidency as bestowed upon him, he would be doing a good job.”

“If anyone says that is not possible because of race, then it will be akin to saying Gurmit Singh cannot act as Phua Chu Kang because he is not a Chinese.”

“Because that would just be racist.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





Hold Presidential election every month to really give all races a fair chance in S’pore

Hold Presidential election every month to really give all races a fair chance in S’pore

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Having 12 presidents a year will ensure a healthy rotation of races.

presidential-election-every-month

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe in fair and square, have come out to urge the government to hold one Presidential Election per month for the next six years.

This after there has been talk about setting aside the Elected Presidency for a Malay candidate to make it fair to all races in Singapore.

One Singaporean, Jin Gong Ping, said: “If you have only one president from one race every six years, all the different races will need to wait a long time for their time to come.”

“If you have 12 presidents a year, you can ensure all four major race categories get represented at least three times a year.”

“Win-win for all.”

However, other locals felt having so many presidents in a year will cause logistical issues in the Istana as they move in and out every month.

Another local, Mei Wen Tee, said she has a solution: “Instead of electing one new president a month, Singaporeans can elect 12 presidents at the start of the year.”

“Then all 12 will stay in the Istana and they get voted off one at a time, a la Big Brother.”

“Some more when spin off a show, Singaporeans can get a closer glimpse of what it is like to be head of state.”

“Very familial.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





If Gurmit Singh can represent Chinese man, Chinese man can be president to represent minorities

If Gurmit Singh can represent Chinese man, Chinese man can be president to represent minorities

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Singaporeans even forget Gurmit Singh is a minority.

phua-chu-kang-non-chinese-president

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who believe race-blindness can be a thing, have cited Gurmit Singh’s role as Phua Chu Kang as the pivotal moment in Singapore’s history where race-blindness has set in.

One Singaporean, Ba Yee Xing, said: “If you don’t remind Singaporeans, Singaporeans also forget Gurmit Singh is a minority to begin with.”

“That is why I believe Singaporeans can look past the race and focus on what the job requires.”

Other locals said an ability to not see someone’s racial identity is what allows Gurmit Singh and Singapore’s next president to function as the job requires.

Another local, Zuo Zhong Tong said: “In the same way, if the next president of Singapore is a Chinese man, so be it.”

“As long as he can represent the interests of the minorities and exercise the sovereign powers of the presidency as bestowed upon him, he would be doing a good job.”

“If anyone says that is not possible because of race, then it will be akin to saying Gurmit Singh cannot act as Phua Chu Kang because he is not a Chinese.”

“Because that would just be racist.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





PAP: ‘We have rectified party logo problem, turned lamp post upside down’

PAP: ‘We have rectified party logo problem, turned lamp post upside down’

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Trust us, we know what we are doing.

pap-lamp-post

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who have seen the PAP banner logo affixed upside down, have been assured that the situation has been fixed.

A PAP grassroots organiser, Pai Mah Pi, said: “After listening to the many feedback from Singaporeans, we have taken into account all the different input and come up with a solution to rectify the problem.”

“We know we are unable to satisfy everyone all the time, but we have successfully turned the lamp post upside down so that now the PAP banner logo is the right side up.”

“This is not the easiest thing to do, but once we have made the decision, we have to follow through to show that we are serious about doing what we say.”

“We sincerely hope those who were our biggest critics who pointed out the error and opposed us, can now see the error of their ways as their judgement of the situation was not correct to begin with as there are more than one way to solve a problem.”

“We can agree to disagree, voice your opinions and dissent if you must, but the PAP will come up with the best solutions to help Singaporeans and do things that are difficult and not to the liking of everyone.”

“And through this instance, we have shown we have what it takes to bring the country forward as we are a party of ideas and one that is ready to make difficult decisions on behalf of Singaporeans, that can at times be difficult for others to accept.”

“We hope you can trust us by giving us your vote, give us the mandate to rule, tweak your perspective to see things from our point-of-view and to work with the PAP to do the impossible.”

At press time, the PAP said it will have no choice but to turn more lamp posts upside down if it means doing so will be for the benefit of Singaporeans.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans look forward to voting in leaders to rule & ruin their lives for next 5 years

S’poreans look forward to voting in leaders to rule & ruin their lives for next 5 years

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How can anyone not be excited about who to destroy your life next?

voting-singapore

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who like to carry out their democratic duty as citizens, said they are excited at the prospect of voting in this coming General Election 2015 on Sept. 11.

This after the election is here again barely four years after GE2011, where voters got to pick and choose from a limited pool of talent and had to decide which not entirely selfless individuals they would want to vote into power so as to let them rule and ruin the lives of everyone else.

One Singaporean, Rao Le Wo, said: “I don’t see how anyone cannot be excited about picking from a bunch of strangers who congregate in political parties.”

“And it is not hard to see how those who like to shake hands and carry babies must be qualified enough to make policy and pass legislation on behalf of everyone else eventually.”

However, not all locals are so enthusiastic. There are others who are simply ecstatic they get to pick a party they aren’t even sure what’s going on with them.

Mei Ting Guo, another local, said: “I can’t wait to be part of this process where I get to choose someone who is not even entirely to my liking and who I will end up bitching about for the next five years till the next General Election comes around and get to do it all over again.”

“The merit of democracy is that I always get to pick between the party I vaguely know of and the other party I have yet to pretend I heard about to become my representative.”

“It is a great way for society to function and as we all pretend there are hardly any flaws to this whole thing.”

At press time, other Singaporeans are rejoicing they are getting Friday Sept. 11 off as it gives them one full free day to think about how badly the next five years will go and how much their lives will be made worse before voting again.

 

 

 

 

 











S’poreans react to news that GE2015 could be happening in September 2015

S’poreans react to news that GE2015 could be happening in September 2015

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Three thoughts that must have went past your mind at some point.

singapore-electoral-map

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong revealed in parliament on July 13, 2015, that the Electoral Boundaries Review Committee (EBRC), comprised of civil servants, was secretly formed two months ago.

He has asked them to create smaller Group Representation Constituencies of five persons and to have at least 12 Single Member Constituencies for this upcoming General Election, which is widely believed to be held in September 2015.

Here are three thoughts Singaporeans have:

 

sian-half-auntie “Oh great, it’s that time of the year again where I am staying in Braddell Heights but I am officially part of Marine Parade because some civil servants in their infinite wisdom decide that’s the case.”
Shi Long Kang, 42-year-old nanny

 

sian-half-uncle “It is such a coincidence that September also happens to be the month of Lee Kuan Yew’s birthday.”
Li Zhong Lee, 70-year-old ex-convict

 

happy-bird-girl “Finally I get to hear PM Lee Hsien Loong apologise again at his lunchtime rally at Boat Quay next to UOB Plaza.”
Zhen Bao Qian, 17-year-old assistant waitress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





New Korean citizen PM Lee Hsien Loong to move 6-member GRC from AMK to Seoul in classic gerrymandering move

New Korean citizen PM Lee Hsien Loong to move 6-member GRC from AMK to Seoul in classic gerrymandering move

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This will make it harder for the opposition to form a GRC team to contest there in the next election.

amk-grc-seoul

pm-lee-hsien-loon-korean

In what is perhaps the next best classic political move of his career, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong will be redrawing the electoral boundaries by moving his six-member GRC from Ang Mo Kio to Seoul, Korea.

This after it was announced on Dec. 11, 2014 that PM Lee has been made an honorary citizen of Seoul by its Mayor Park Won Soon.

Professional political observers who heard this news said they were not surprised as gerrymandering has long been common in Singapore politics for decades.

They also said it was a matter of time before the electoral boundaries get cut up and merged across transnational boundaries, which is to the detriment of opposition political parties.

One such observer, Lim Koh Pee, a retired local who goes to the coffee shop everyday with his pet bird in a cage, said: “This will definitely make it more difficult for the opposition political parties to gather their resources and mobilise their volunteers and candidates, as they don’t even have a base in Seoul, Korea.”

Once the relocation of the GRC is completed, the current constituents of Ang Mo Kio will not be able to vote in the next general election as they will no longer be represented by any political party.

This will continue to strengthen the PAP’s grip.

Self-styled political pundit, Eric de Yaya, said: “This is a strategic move that will pay dividends in the long run.”

“It will be harder for Workers’ Party to form the next government because they cannot do so by toppling one GRC after another domestically, as the rest of the GRCs and SMCs will be relocated all over the world in a few years’ time.”

 

Other news on how international news affects Singapore politics:

Scotland referendum to become independent country provides learning points for Hougang SMC

Pioneer Generation allowed to vote for another 50 years after death

Pioneer Generation allowed to vote for another 50 years after death

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Votes by the deceased will still be valid in future elections as a way to pay tribute to them.

By Nyi Nyi

pioneer-generation-spore

In yet another remarkable tribute to the old people of Singapore, the government passed a bill allowing members of the Pioneer Generation to continue voting in future elections up to 50 years after their passing.

A spokesperson for the new law said the bill was undertaken to recognise the efforts of older Singaporeans who helped build Singapore and this will allow their voices to be heard even after their death.

The spokesperson, Tang Kee, said: “We will spare no expenses in hiring mediums and verifying which party the deceased voted for when alive.”

“Most likely Barisan Sosialis, but since they are no longer around… Hmmm… Their votes will be transferred to the next best party that was around at that time.”

Qu Shi Le, a member of the pioneer generation who is wholeheartedly behind this measure, said: “To have a say in the direction my beloved country is heading, even after my passing, is a real honour.”

Unfortunately, Qu passed away a month ago, but that is probably what he would have wanted to say if he was still alive, claimed the spokesman.

The bill is expected to kick in from the next election onward and will be practised until people stop making such a big fuss over Population White Paper.

Bye bye, Tan Kin Lian?

Bye bye, Tan Kin Lian?

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Why Singapore presidential hopeful Tan Kin Lian isn’t an automatic shoo-in.

By Belmont Lay

NTUC not company meh?

TAN Kin Lian might, after all, not be eligible to be president of Singapore based on a technicality.

Here’s why: Tan was the CEO of NTUC Income, a “co-operative insurance society” registered under the Co-operative Societies Act, which although strives for “commercial leadership” in its “business“, is actually structured differently from a company registered under the Companies Act.

So, in English, this means that Tan was NOT AND NEVER WAS the CEO of a company incorporated or registered under the Companies Act.

And if you check out the Singapore Elections Department list of Qualifications for Candidates seeking to become president, it is stated in no uncertain terms that one of the essential criteria for presidential aspirants is that they must have served as CEO (or as chairman of the board of directors) of a company incorporated or registered under the Companies Act.

Still not convinced? Here’s more.

When you google “Tan Kin Lian”, you will most likely find displayed among the top three results, his Wikipedia entry.

In his entry, it is stated that Tan is the “former CEO of NTUC Income”.

Next, follow the NTUC Income link at the footnote and you’ll arrive at its official website and click on its About Us page where it is stated in black and white that “NTUC Income, a co-operative insurance society formed in 1970″, was initiated by Goh Keng Swee (bless his soul).

So are we really splitting hairs when we try to make heads or tails of a co-operative and a company?

Sure as hell!

Therefore, to dig further, simply google “co-operative vs company singapore” because you want to find out what’s the difference between them and you will most likely find your query answered by the Singapore National Co-operative Federation’s FAQ page, which should be displayed as one of the top three results.

In it, transmitted through the ones-and-noughts of the supreme Internet, are three ways a co-operative is different from a company.

Primo: Voting in a co-operative is determined by one-member-one-vote policy but voting in a company is determined by type and number of shares held. (Think Singapore Press Holdings where there exists ordinary shares for mortals and not-so-ordinary-200-times-voting-power management shares if you’re part of the potentate.)

Secundo: A co-operative is an association of members while a company is an association of capital (an association I actually find damn sexy).

Tertio: The objective of a co-operative is to serve members’ needs while a company is to maximise profits for its shareholders. (Think SPH again!)

And to bludgeon the nail and seal the lid on the coffin, do spend four seconds to read the PDF document stating the by-laws of NTUC Income.

It states in page one that NTUC Income is registered under the Co-operative Societies Act.

So here’s the point of today’s missive: I stated before that Tan Cheng Bock must be bonkers if he honestly (or rather naively) thinks that his take on the 1987 so-called Marxist conspiracy can be buried and hidden from public scrutiny.

Sure, Tan Kin Lian might have been CEO for 30 years with a business that manages capital of $20 billion and beyond, but I just hope he will not join the club for the bonkers if he thinks that the Presidential Elections Committee will lay the red carpet out for him.

Because I hate false hope. Likewise for the multitudes out there who are counting on him.

Editor’s note:

This article was edited on July 5, at 5.25pm after it was first published for the following reason:

While Tan Kin Lian isn’t the CEO of a company, he may still qualify on the basis that he is “in any other similar or comparable position of seniority and responsibility in any other organization or department of equivalent size or complexity in the public or private sector which, in the opinion of the Presidential Elections Committee, has given him such experience and ability in administering and managing financial affairs as to enable him to carry out effectively the functions and duties of the office of President.”

We thank Wong Chun Han for pointing this out.

What this means is that whether Tan Kin Lian contests is still the decision of the Presidential Elections Committee. It’s no longer obvious that he will stand for elections.

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