Tag Archive | "anniversary"

S’poreans remember Lee Kuan Yew by solemnly waiting at his daughter’s Facebook page

S’poreans remember Lee Kuan Yew by solemnly waiting at his daughter’s Facebook page

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They will be waiting and watching till the day is over.

lee-kuan-yew-daughter

Singaporeans from all walks of life, who are quietly observing Lee Kuan Yew’s second year death anniversary on March 23, 2017, are paying their respects to the first prime minister in their own personal way.

This after they noticed there isn’t much hoo-ha events organised offline this year compared to 2016, where tribute sites and activities were lined up throughout the day.

One Singaporean, Qi Dao, said: “I spent my whole day quietly thinking about Lee Kuan Yew and his contributions.”

“And waiting at his daughter’s Facebook page for any status updates.”

“When there are any, Lee Kuan Yew will be in everyone’s collective consciousness. And on everyone’s Facebook news feed.”

Other locals said waiting at Lee Kuan Yew’s daughter’s Facebook page will remind everyone about Lee Kuan Yew’s role in Singapore.

Another local, Kua Hee, said: “Nothing really beats the hard truth.”

“This will really keep Singapore going.”

 

 

 

 

 

 





Silent Majority anxious about coming out again for Lee Kuan Yew’s 2nd death anniversary

Silent Majority anxious about coming out again for Lee Kuan Yew’s 2nd death anniversary

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It was tough on them showing up in public and risked getting photographed and identified.

silent-majority

The Silent Majority, who showed up in full force two years ago in an unprecedented display of outpouring of grief to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, are feeling increasingly anxious.

This after they realise they have to come back out from hiding as the former prime minister’s second year death anniversary is here again on March 23.

Members of the Silent Majority said their initial fears of being put in the spotlight in 2015 were totally founded — as attention then focused on them standing for hours and forming long queues outside Parliament House where Lee Kuan Yew’s body was lying in state.

One Silent Majority person, who declined to be named as she doesn’t typically put herself out there like that, said: “It was a harrowing experience for me and the rest of the Silent Majority.”

“Thinking about how we now need to publicly stand up again for what we believe in instead of hiding behind the scenes, is getting me worried.”

“We are going to be so exposed again and there will be no veil we can hide behind, no safe haven to reside and there will be cameras everywhere. There is that risk we are going to be identified.”

“But luckily there will be nightfall, so those of us who are really uncomfortable can blend into the dark, while taking a quiet stand to show our support and respect for Lee Kuan Yew.”

“Still a bit worried though that we have to come back out in the darkness to avoid being seen now that our presence is needed again.”

Other members of the Silent Majority, though, were even more coy about their experience, when asked to be interviewed.

One Silent Majority member who has been part of the low-key mainstream for the last few decades, said: “You mean you want a quote from me for an interview? I’m sorry, I don’t have any strong views about this.”

“I am really just a fence-sitter. I don’t feel like I am capable of providing you with a point-of-view.”

“Please, don’t take a photo of me. Wait for me to walk away first. Can give me a two-minute head start?”

 

 

 

 

 

 





Silent Majority anxious about coming back out into open for Lee Kuan Yew’s 1-year death anniversary

Silent Majority anxious about coming back out into open for Lee Kuan Yew’s 1-year death anniversary

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It was tough on them showing up in public and risked getting photographed and identified.

silent-majority

The Silent Majority, who showed up in full force last year in an unprecedented display of outpouring of grief to pay their last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, are feeling increasingly anxious.

This after they realise they have to come back out from hiding as the former prime minister’s first year death anniversary is here.

Members of the Silent Majority said their initial fears of being put in the spotlight last year, as attention then will be focused on them standing for hours and forming long queues outside Parliament House where Lee Kuan Yew’s body was lying in state, were totally founded.

One Silent Majority person, who declined to be named as she doesn’t typically put herself out there like that, said: “It was a harrowing experience for me and the rest of the Silent Majority.”

“Thinking about how we now again need to publicly stand up for what we believe in, instead of hiding behind the scenes, is getting me worried.”

“We are going to be so exposed again and there will be no veil we can hide behind, no safe haven to reside and there will be cameras everywhere. There is that risk we are going to be identified.”

“But luckily there will be nightfall, so those of us who are really uncomfortable can blend into the dark, while taking a quiet stand to show our support and respect for Lee Kuan Yew.”

“Still a bit worried though that we have to come back out in the darkness to avoid being seen now that our presence is needed again.”

Other members of the Silent Majority, though, were even more coy about their experience, when asked to be interviewed.

One Silent Majority member who has been part of the low-key mainstream for the last few decades, said: “You mean you want a quote from me for an interview? I’m sorry, I don’t have any strong views about this.”

“I am really just a fence-sitter. I don’t feel like I am capable of providing you with a point-of-view.”

“Please, don’t take a photo of me. Wait for me to walk away first. Can give me a two-minute head start?”

 

 

 

 

 











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